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Beverage Antennas
Beverage Antennas
Published: 2015/10/20
Channel: Valerie Hotzfeld
How a Beverage Antenna Works
How a Beverage Antenna Works
Published: 2014/04/20
Channel: Stan Gibilisco
540 ft Beverage antenna Vs 1/2 wave inverted Vee  @ 100 ft
540 ft Beverage antenna Vs 1/2 wave inverted Vee @ 100 ft
Published: 2012/10/17
Channel: Mike Larson
What is BEVERAGE ANTENNA? What does BEVERAGE ANTENNA mean? BEVERAGE ANTENNA meaning & explanation
What is BEVERAGE ANTENNA? What does BEVERAGE ANTENNA mean? BEVERAGE ANTENNA meaning & explanation
Published: 2017/03/13
Channel: The Audiopedia
360ft Beverage receive antenna - 40M Demo
360ft Beverage receive antenna - 40M Demo
Published: 2016/12/29
Channel: Mauro R.
Random Wire vs Beverage Antenna Shortwave
Random Wire vs Beverage Antenna Shortwave
Published: 2015/01/03
Channel: kc0tfi
BEVERAGE ELIMINATES LOCAL NOISE: Beverage Antenna Experiments
BEVERAGE ELIMINATES LOCAL NOISE: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Published: 2016/10/11
Channel: Bill DesJardins
Beverage Antenna at K2XT - Part I
Beverage Antenna at K2XT - Part I
Published: 2011/10/24
Channel: therixsterinnj
List for the Beverage Antenna
List for the Beverage Antenna
Published: 2016/02/28
Channel: Frank Brunke
Beverage 320meters vs INV VEE
Beverage 320meters vs INV VEE
Published: 2013/12/20
Channel: Alex Betsan
Beverage vs. Horizontal Single Waller Flag
Beverage vs. Horizontal Single Waller Flag
Published: 2016/03/05
Channel: juktar
720
720' Beverage Receive Antenna Demo
Published: 2009/11/24
Channel: ww2dx
Beverage Antenna for Receiving
Beverage Antenna for Receiving
Published: 2016/12/10
Channel: Stan Gibilisco
An Improved Beverage Antenna - Ned Mountain
An Improved Beverage Antenna - Ned Mountain
Published: 2015/04/21
Channel: Sawnee Radio
Un Terminated Beverage HD
Un Terminated Beverage HD
Published: 2017/01/06
Channel: dandypoint
AX (Amateur Xcellence) Beverage Video 001
AX (Amateur Xcellence) Beverage Video 001
Published: 2015/10/23
Channel: Byron Allen
160m Beverage Antenna 140
160m Beverage Antenna 140' Long
Published: 2017/02/04
Channel: WD Roberson
40M VERTICAL VS SHORT BEVERAGE ANTENNA
40M VERTICAL VS SHORT BEVERAGE ANTENNA
Published: 2015/06/05
Channel: BRIAN fields
the power of the beverage antenna
the power of the beverage antenna
Published: 2012/02/05
Channel: tvdxrools
Project update: 200 metre longwire/ Beverage antenna
Project update: 200 metre longwire/ Beverage antenna
Published: 2016/08/30
Channel: Oxford Shortwave Log
NE vs. West: Beverage Antenna Experiments
NE vs. West: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Published: 2016/10/14
Channel: Bill DesJardins
BEVERAGE ANTENNA EXPERIMENTS: Beverage Destroyed
BEVERAGE ANTENNA EXPERIMENTS: Beverage Destroyed
Published: 2016/12/20
Channel: Bill DesJardins
First Experience with a Beverage Antenna, OK1P, Russian DX Contest 2017
First Experience with a Beverage Antenna, OK1P, Russian DX Contest 2017
Published: 2017/03/21
Channel: Petr Malý
Beverage antenna compared to 40m dipole
Beverage antenna compared to 40m dipole
Published: 2015/04/26
Channel: David Arwood
3 PM QSO with Europe: Beverage Antenna Experiments
3 PM QSO with Europe: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Published: 2016/10/09
Channel: Bill DesJardins
BEVERAGE ANTENNA
BEVERAGE ANTENNA
Published: 2015/06/14
Channel: BRIAN fields
N2ZN Beverages
N2ZN Beverages
Published: 2010/11/14
Channel: n2zn
240ft Beverage receive antenna - 80M Demo
240ft Beverage receive antenna - 80M Demo
Published: 2017/01/26
Channel: Mauro R.
Saudi Arabia: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Saudi Arabia: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Published: 2016/10/01
Channel: Bill DesJardins
BEVERAGE ANTENNA TEST.
BEVERAGE ANTENNA TEST.
Published: 2012/02/28
Channel: TRAC Trabzon Şubesi
wellbrook loop v beverage antenna on mw
wellbrook loop v beverage antenna on mw
Published: 2017/01/16
Channel: tvdxrools
Reducing noise with beverage antenna
Reducing noise with beverage antenna
Published: 2012/07/22
Channel: MrJacktheNipper
Beverage antenna at DX-Antwerps DX-pedition in Walsoorden
Beverage antenna at DX-Antwerps DX-pedition in Walsoorden
Published: 2011/06/26
Channel: Guido Schotmans
Beverage antenna at K2XT - Part 2
Beverage antenna at K2XT - Part 2
Published: 2011/10/25
Channel: therixsterinnj
#0107 Análisis de la antena Beverage (Beverage antenna review)
#0107 Análisis de la antena Beverage (Beverage antenna review)
Published: 2016/12/30
Channel: XQ2CG Sergio
Beverage antenna at K2XT - Part 3
Beverage antenna at K2XT - Part 3
Published: 2011/10/25
Channel: therixsterinnj
40m 1/2 Wave Shortened Beverage Antenna 1
40m 1/2 Wave Shortened Beverage Antenna 1
Published: 2015/05/04
Channel: WD4ED
Episode 46 - Receiver Comparisons and Beverage antennas with Dave Anderson, K4SV
Episode 46 - Receiver Comparisons and Beverage antennas with Dave Anderson, K4SV
Published: 2017/01/06
Channel: Ham Talk Live!
160 meter BOG
160 meter BOG
Published: 2015/11/01
Channel: Arthur Snapper
VK3SS & W1ZY Shortpath •  Beverage Antenna Experiments
VK3SS & W1ZY Shortpath • Beverage Antenna Experiments
Published: 2016/10/15
Channel: Bill DesJardins
300m Beverage antenna front/back attenaution
300m Beverage antenna front/back attenaution
Published: 2014/12/31
Channel: Tomasz Pabich
240ft Beverage receive antenna - 80M UK (G0EVY)
240ft Beverage receive antenna - 80M UK (G0EVY)
Published: 2017/02/01
Channel: Mauro R.
Project update: 200 metre deployable antenna system - standard longwire & Beverage
Project update: 200 metre deployable antenna system - standard longwire & Beverage
Published: 2016/08/17
Channel: Oxford Shortwave Log
VK2GGC Jamboree 2016: Beverage Antenna Experiments
VK2GGC Jamboree 2016: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Published: 2016/10/15
Channel: Bill DesJardins
Reception on 160Band with Beverage antenna
Reception on 160Band with Beverage antenna
Published: 2016/11/05
Channel: Dimitris TL SV8ANW
Beverage Antennas - Matt Maguire VK2RQ - Manly-Warringah Radio Society lecture
Beverage Antennas - Matt Maguire VK2RQ - Manly-Warringah Radio Society lecture
Published: 2014/04/27
Channel: VK2MB-TV
Beverage antenna at Hovet - in the field
Beverage antenna at Hovet - in the field
Published: 2013/03/26
Channel: Søren fivePSixE
Beverage antenna design: Maximum Effective Length...simple, yet complex!
Beverage antenna design: Maximum Effective Length...simple, yet complex!
Published: 2016/10/01
Channel: Oxford Shortwave Log
Spain: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Spain: Beverage Antenna Experiments
Published: 2016/10/01
Channel: Bill DesJardins
RX testing 350m long Beverage antenna vs. 160m delta loop
RX testing 350m long Beverage antenna vs. 160m delta loop
Published: 2013/12/29
Channel: SP2XF
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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The Beverage antenna or "wave antenna" is a long-wire receiving antenna mainly used in the low frequency and medium frequency radio bands, invented by Harold H. Beverage in 1921.[1] It is used by amateur radio, shortwave listening, and longwave radio DXers and military applications.

A Beverage antenna consists of a horizontal wire from one-half to several wavelengths long (hundreds of feet at HF to several kilometres for longwave) suspended above the ground, with the feedline to the receiver attached to one end and the other terminated through a resistor to ground.[2][3] The antenna has a unidirectional radiation pattern with the main lobe of the pattern at a shallow angle into the sky off the resistor-terminated end, making it ideal for reception of long distance skywave (skip) transmissions from stations over the horizon which reflect off the ionosphere. However the antenna must be built so the wire points at the location of the transmitter. Some Beverage antennas use a two-wire design that allows reception in two directions from a single Beverage antenna. Other designs use sloped ends where the center of the antenna is six to eight feet high and both ends of the antenna gradually slope downwards towards the termination resistor and matching transformer.

The advantages of the Beverage are excellent directivity, and wider bandwidth than resonant antennas. Its disadvantages are its physical size, requiring considerable land area, and inability to rotate to change the direction of reception. Installations often use multiple antennas to provide wide azimuth coverage.

History[edit]

Harold H. Beverage experimented with receiving antennas similar to the Beverage antenna in 1919 at the Otter Cliffs Radio Station.[4][5] He discovered in 1920 that an otherwise nearly bidirectional long-wire antenna becomes unidirectional by placing it close to the lossy earth and by terminating one end of the wire with a resistor. By 1921, Beverage long-wave receiving antennas up to nine miles (14 km) long had been installed at RCA's Riverhead, New York,[6] Belfast, Maine,[7] Belmar, New Jersey,[8] and Chatham, Massachusetts,[9] receiver stations for transatlantic radiotelegraphy traffic. The antenna was patented in 1921 and named for its inventor Beverage. Perhaps the largest Beverage antenna—an array of four phased Beverages[10] three miles (5 km) long and two miles (3 km) wide—was built by AT&T in Houlton, Maine, for the first transatlantic telephone system[11] opened in 1927.

Description[edit]

Animation showing how the antenna works. Due to ground resistance the electric field of the radio wave (E, big red arrows) is at an angle θ to the vertical, creating a horizontal component parallel to the antenna wire (small red arrows). The horizontal electric field creates a traveling wave of oscillating current (I, blue line) and voltage along the wire, which increases in amplitude with distance from the end. When it reaches the driven end (left), the current passes through the transmission line to the receiver. Radio waves in the other direction, toward the terminated end, create traveling waves which are absorbed by the terminating resistor R, so the antenna has a unidirectional pattern.
A Beverage antenna that can be improvised for military field communications, from a 1995 U.S. Army field manual. Rather than being grounded, the resistor is attached to a second lower wire which serves as a counterpoise, an artificial ground for the transmitter. The antenna's main lobe, its direction of greatest sensitivity, is to the right, off the end of the wire that is terminated in the resistor.

The Beverage antenna consists of a horizontal wire one-half to several wavelengths long, suspended close to the ground, usually 10 to 20 feet high, pointed in the direction of the signal source.[3][2] At the end toward the signal source it is terminated by a resistor to ground approximately equal in value to the characteristic impedance of the antenna considered as a transmission line, usually 400 to 800 ohms. At the other end it is connected to the receiver with a transmission line, through a balun to match the line to the antenna's characteristic impedance.

Operation[edit]

Unlike other wire antennas such as dipole or monopole antennas which act as resonators, with the radio currents traveling in both directions along the element, bouncing back and forth between the ends as standing waves, the Beverage antenna is a traveling wave antenna; the radio frequency current travels in one direction along the wire, in the same direction as the radio waves.[3][2][12] The lack of resonance gives it a wider bandwidth than resonant antennas. It receives vertically polarized radio waves, but unlike other vertically polarized antennas it is suspended close to the ground, and requires some resistance in the ground to work.

The Beverage antenna relies on "wave tilt" for its operation. At low and medium frequencies, a vertically polarized radio frequency electromagnetic wave traveling close to the surface of the earth with finite ground conductivity sustains a loss that causes the wavefront to "tilt over" at an angle.[3][2][12] The electric field is not perpendicular to the ground but at an angle, producing an electric field component parallel to the Earth's surface. If a horizontal wire is suspended close to the Earth and approximately parallel to the wave's direction, the electric field generates an oscillating RF current wave traveling along the wire, propagating in the same direction as the wavefront. The RF currents traveling along the wire add in phase and amplitude throughout the length of the wire, producing maximum signal strength at the far end of the antenna where the receiver is connected.

The antenna wire and the ground under it together can be thought of as a "leaky" transmission line which absorbs energy from the radio waves.[12] The velocity of the current waves in the antenna is less than the speed of light due to the ground. The velocity of the wavefront along the wire is also less than the speed of light due to its angle. At a certain angle θmax the two velocities are equal. At this angle the gain of the antenna is maximum, so the radiation pattern has a main lobe at this angle. The angle of the main lobe is[13]

where

is the length of the antenna wire,
is the wavelength.

The antenna has a unidirectional reception pattern, because RF signals arriving from the other direction, from the receiver end of the wire, induce currents propagating toward the terminated end, where they are absorbed by the terminating resistor.

The antenna is particularly suited to receive radio waves reflected from the ionosphere, called skywave, or "skip" propagation, which is used for long-distance communication at shortwave frequencies. The radio waves typically arrive at the Earth's surface with shallow angles (wave tilt) of approximately 5 to 45 degrees, which is a good match to the antenna's direction of maximal gain (main lobe).

Gain[edit]

While Beverage antennas have excellent directivity, because they are close to lossy Earth, they do not produce absolute gain; their gain is typically from −20 to −10 dBi. This is rarely a problem, because the antenna is used at frequencies where there are high levels of atmospheric radio noise. At these frequencies the atmospheric noise, and not receiver noise, determines the signal-to-noise ratio, so an inefficient antenna can be used. The antenna is not used as a transmitting antenna, since a large portion of the drive power is wasted in the terminating resistor. The Beverage antenna is a good receiving antenna because it offers excellent directivity over a broad bandwidth, albeit with relatively large size.

Directivity increases with the length of the antenna. While directivity begins to develop at a length of only 0.25 wavelength, directivity becomes more significant at one wavelength and improves steadily until the antenna reaches a length of about two wavelengths. In Beverages longer than two wavelengths, directivity does not increase because the currents in the antenna cannot remain in phase with the radio wave.

The Beverage antenna is most frequently deployed as a single wire. A dual-wire variant is sometimes utilized for rearward null steering or for bidirectional switching. The antenna can also be implemented as an array of 2 to 128 or more elements in broadside, endfire, and staggered configurations, offering significantly improved directivity otherwise very difficult to attain at these frequencies. A four-element broadside/staggered Beverage array was used by AT&T at their longwave telephone receiver site in Houlton, Maine. Very large phased Beverage arrays of 64 elements or more have been implemented for receiving antennas for over-the-horizon radar systems.

Implementation[edit]

A single-wire Beverage antenna is typically a single straight copper wire, between one and two wavelengths long, running parallel to the Earth's surface in the direction of the desired signal. The wire is suspended by insulated supports above the ground. A non-inductive resistor approximately equal to the characteristic impedance of the wire, about 400 to 600 ohms, is connected from the far end of the wire to a ground rod. The other end of the wire is connected to the feedline to the receiver.

The driving impedance of the antenna is equal to the characteristic impedance of the wire with respect to ground, somewhere between 400 and 800 ohms, depending on the height of the wire. Typically a length of 50-ohm or 75-ohm coaxial cable would be used for connecting the receiver to the antenna endpoint. A matching transformer should be inserted between any such low-impedance transmission line and the higher 470-ohm impedance of the antenna. A transformer with a turns ratio of 3:1 would provide an impedance transformation of 9:1, which will match the antenna to a 50-ohm transmission line. A transformer with a turns ratio of 5:2 would provide an impedance transformation of 6.25:1, which will match the antenna to a 75-ohm transmission line. Alternatively, a parallel-wire transmission line (twin lead) of 600 ohms makes a fairly good match to the antenna.

See also[edit]

Patents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beverage, Harold H.; Rice, Chester W.; Kellogg, Edward W. (January 1923). "The Wave Antenna - A New Type of Highly Directive Antenna" (PDF). Trans. of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. AIEE. 42: 215–266. ISSN 0096-3860. doi:10.1109/T-AIEE.1923.5060870. Retrieved July 7, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d Laporte, Edmund A. (1952). Radio Antenna Engineering. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co. pp. 55–59. 
  3. ^ a b c d Carr, Joseph J. (January 1998). "The Beverage Antenna". Popular Electronics. Farmington, IL: Gernsback Publications. 15 (1): 40–46. Retrieved July 1, 2016. , also archived here
  4. ^ "End of an Era: NSGA Winter Harbor to Close Its Doors". navy.mil. Retrieved December 8, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Radio NBD, Otter Cliffs, Maine (circa 1917-1919) - from Les Smallwood, CTRCS, USN Retired". navycthistory.com. Retrieved December 8, 2016. 
  6. ^ "The Book of Radio--Radio Central chapter (1922)". earlyradiohistory.us. Retrieved December 8, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Radio Free Belfast (Maine)". maine.gov. Retrieved December 8, 2016. 
  8. ^ Carl, Corinne. "Info Age - 1914 Station Description". campevans.org. Retrieved December 8, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Chatham Marconi Maritime Center -- Marconi-RCA Wireless Museum & Education Center". chathammarconi.org. Retrieved December 8, 2016. 
  10. ^ four phased Beverages
  11. ^ first transatlantic telephone system
  12. ^ a b c Poisel, Richard (2012). Antenna Systems and Electronic Warfare Applications. Artech House. pp. 300–310. ISBN 1608074846. 
  13. ^ Poisel (2012) Antenna Systems and Electronic Warfare Applications, p.310, eq. 8.18.

Sources[edit]

  • Antenna Theory and Design by Warren L. Stutzman, Gary A. Thiele, John Wiley & Sons, May 22, 2012

External links[edit]

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