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The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2015/06/17
Channel: John Hanks Actor VO Artist
"The Blind Men and the Elephant" by John G. Saxe (read by Tom O
"The Blind Men and the Elephant" by John G. Saxe (read by Tom O'Bedlam)
Published: 2010/08/31
Channel: SpokenVerse
Six Blind Men and the Elephant
Six Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2012/10/17
Channel: Universal Theosophy
Panasonic G9 and the Big Bet: Ergonomics vs. Electronics?
Panasonic G9 and the Big Bet: Ergonomics vs. Electronics?
Published: 2017/11/08
Channel: Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions
Six Blind Men & their opinion - respect others views
Six Blind Men & their opinion - respect others views
Published: 2012/04/12
Channel: Kadir Khan
THE BLIND MEN AND THE ELEPHANT
THE BLIND MEN AND THE ELEPHANT
Published: 2015/08/26
Channel: PHILIP CHIRCOP
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2017/07/15
Channel: Kodomo Toshin
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2011/04/24
Channel: lshulman58
iPhone X: End of the Steve Jobs Era
iPhone X: End of the Steve Jobs Era
Published: 2017/11/03
Channel: Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions
Cancer The Emperor of All Maladies 2015 Ep.3 The Blind Men and the Elephant
Cancer The Emperor of All Maladies 2015 Ep.3 The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2017/08/01
Channel: Science Br
J.R. Church: Six Blind Men and an Elephant
J.R. Church: Six Blind Men and an Elephant
Published: 2013/04/12
Channel: Prophecy in the News
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2017/10/15
Channel: Martin Faulks
The Blind Men and The Elephant
The Blind Men and The Elephant
Published: 2017/08/24
Channel: Lessons Taught By Life
The Six Blind Men and the Elephant
The Six Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2016/02/26
Channel: Ivan Battilana
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2012/10/12
Channel: imyouandurme
The Panasonic GH5 Has Me Thinking, Episode 1: High ISO Noise
The Panasonic GH5 Has Me Thinking, Episode 1: High ISO Noise
Published: 2017/01/17
Channel: Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions
Six Blind Men
Six Blind Men
Published: 2009/05/19
Channel: kanika24fps
An Elephant and Four Blind Men
An Elephant and Four Blind Men
Published: 2017/03/20
Channel: FitLifeTV
Blind Men and the Elephant
Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2010/07/19
Channel: Randall Niles
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2017/03/20
Channel: Seungin Ha
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2015/07/09
Channel: Ann Salt
The Blind Men and the Elephant (poem)
The Blind Men and the Elephant (poem)
Published: 2014/02/06
Channel: audiobooksfree
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2016/08/10
Channel: Bill Robertson
हाथी और छह अंधे व्यक्ति  Elephant and Six Blind Men Story in Hindi
हाथी और छह अंधे व्यक्ति Elephant and Six Blind Men Story in Hindi
Published: 2017/08/22
Channel: AchhiKhabar
Matt Chandler - The Elephant and the Blind Men
Matt Chandler - The Elephant and the Blind Men
Published: 2011/09/13
Channel: orlibonurb
Illustrated Story - The Blind men and Elephant
Illustrated Story - The Blind men and Elephant
Published: 2013/11/11
Channel: ISKCON Desire Tree
Video - Six Blind Men and the Elephant re-told by Debbie Dunn
Video - Six Blind Men and the Elephant re-told by Debbie Dunn
Published: 2010/10/10
Channel: Debbie Dunn
Sleepless Over the Sony a9: What is it, really -- and for whom?
Sleepless Over the Sony a9: What is it, really -- and for whom?
Published: 2017/04/22
Channel: Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions
John Godfrey Saxe "The Blind Men and the Elephant " Poem animation Indian parable
John Godfrey Saxe "The Blind Men and the Elephant " Poem animation Indian parable
Published: 2011/02/14
Channel: poetryreincarnations
All Religions Are True?? | Blind Men & the Elephant |
All Religions Are True?? | Blind Men & the Elephant |
Published: 2016/06/02
Channel: For Our King
The Blind Men And The Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe - Poetry Reading
The Blind Men And The Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe - Poetry Reading
Published: 2012/09/15
Channel: Pearls Of Wisdom
Ultimate GH5 Rig, Zacuto and...Plankton
Ultimate GH5 Rig, Zacuto and...Plankton
Published: 2017/10/16
Channel: Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions
my favourite story: "the blind men & the elephant"
my favourite story: "the blind men & the elephant"
Published: 2017/05/10
Channel: Cedric Sprick
Rumi: An Elephant in the Dark - Sufi Poem of the Parable of the Elephant and the Blind Monks
Rumi: An Elephant in the Dark - Sufi Poem of the Parable of the Elephant and the Blind Monks
Published: 2014/08/31
Channel: cptmuji
The Story of the Seven Blind Men and the Elephant
The Story of the Seven Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2007/08/12
Channel: ProFriend
The Blind Men and the Elephant Video1
The Blind Men and the Elephant Video1
Published: 2017/02/08
Channel: Anton Scheving
Sanskrit Skit: Blind men and an elephant
Sanskrit Skit: Blind men and an elephant
Published: 2016/10/17
Channel: Srikant Pande
EBS The Six Blind Men and the Elephant
EBS The Six Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2016/10/28
Channel: Other Channel
Tibetan Children Story: 4 Blind Men and an Elephant
Tibetan Children Story: 4 Blind Men and an Elephant
Published: 2015/08/27
Channel: Phurbu Namgyal
Four Blind Men and the Elephant
Four Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2016/11/09
Channel: punahm Park
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2016/01/20
Channel: shaked levy
Elephant and Blind Men - Play
Elephant and Blind Men - Play
Published: 2012/03/25
Channel: Mani Natarajan
The Story of the Seven Blind Men and the Elephant
The Story of the Seven Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2009/08/01
Channel: ProFriend
瞎子摸象 Blind Men Feeling An Elephant
瞎子摸象 Blind Men Feeling An Elephant
Published: 2016/02/26
Channel: 高雄市電影館
The Blind Men and the Elephant- Grandpa
The Blind Men and the Elephant- Grandpa's Indian Heritage Summer Camp Vol. II
Published: 2011/06/15
Channel: kanai mukherjee
6 Blind Men and an Elephant
6 Blind Men and an Elephant
Published: 2012/01/29
Channel: Roger Everaert
Drama "Six Men and an Elephant" - Children
Drama "Six Men and an Elephant" - Children's Story Drama
Published: 2009/06/05
Channel: NuBeat Music
Aquila - An Elephant Surrounded By Blind Men (2,3)
Aquila - An Elephant Surrounded By Blind Men (2,3)
Published: 2008/07/24
Channel: sidadrumbum
The Blind Men and the Elephant
The Blind Men and the Elephant
Published: 2012/04/25
Channel: achajed91
The Elephant and Blind Men Parable
The Elephant and Blind Men Parable
Published: 2008/08/25
Channel: videosearch4321
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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Blind Men Appraising an Elephant by Ohara Donshu, Edo Period (early 19th century), Brooklyn Museum
Blind men and elephant

The parable of the blind men and an elephant originated in ancient Indian subcontinent, from where it has widely diffused. It is a story of a group of blind men, who have never come across an elephant before, learn and conceptualize what the elephant is like by touching it. Each blind man feels a different part of the elephant body, but only one part, such as the side or the tusk. They then describe the elephant based on their partial experience and their descriptions are in complete disagreement on what an elephant is. In some versions they come to suspect that the other person is dishonest and they come to blows. The moral of the parable is that humans have a tendency to project their partial experiences as the whole truth, ignore other people's partial experiences, and one should consider that one may be partially right and may have partial information.[1][2]

The earliest mentions of this premise occurs in the Rigveda,[3] and a complete version of the story is traceable to the Buddhist text Udana 6.4, dated to about mid 1st millennium BCE. According to John Ireland, the parable is likely older than the Buddhist text.[4]

An alternate version of the parable describes normal men, experiencing a large statue on a dark night, or with blindfold masking their eyes experiencing a large object by feeling it. They then describe what it is they experienced. In its various versions, it is a parable that has crossed between many religious traditions and is part of Buddhist, Hindu and Jain texts of 1st millennium CE or before.[3][4] The story also appears in 2nd millennium Sufi and Bahá’í lore. The tale later became well known in Europe, with 19th century American poet John Godfrey Saxe creating his own version as a poem.[5] The story has been published in many books for adults and children, and interpreted in a variety of ways.

The parable[edit]

The earliest versions of the parable of blind men and elephant is found in Buddhist, Hindu and Jain texts, as they discuss the limits of perception and the importance of complete context. The parable has several Indian variations, but broadly goes as follows:[6][2]

A group of blind men heard that a strange animal, called an elephant, had been brought to the town, but none of them were aware of its shape and form. Out of curiosity, they said: "We must inspect and know it by touch, of which we are capable". So, they sought it out, and when they found it they groped about it. In the case of the first person, whose hand landed on the trunk, said "This being is like a thick snake". For another one whose hand reached its ear, it seemed like a kind of fan. As for another person, whose hand was upon its leg, said, the elephant is a pillar like a tree-trunk. The blind man who placed his hand upon its side said, "elephant is a wall". Another who felt its tail, described it as a rope. The last felt its tusk, stating the elephant is that which is hard, smooth and like a spear.

The blind men and the elephant
(wall relief in Northeast Thailand)

In some versions, the blind men then discover their disagreements, suspect the others to be not telling the truth and come to blows. The stories also differ primarily in how the elephant's body parts are described, how violent the conflict becomes and how (or if) the conflict among the men and their perspectives is resolved. In some versions, they stop talking, start listening and collaborate to "see" the full elephant. In another, a sighted man enters the parable and describes the entire elephant from various perspectives, the blind men then learn that they were all partially correct and partially wrong. While one's subjective experience is true, it may not be the totality of truth.[4][6]

The parable has been used to illustrate a range of truths and fallacies; broadly, the parable implies that one's subjective experience can be true, but that such experience is inherently limited by its failure to account for other truths or a totality of truth. At various times the parable has provided insight into the relativism, opaqueness or inexpressible nature of truth, the behavior of experts in fields where there is a deficit or inaccessibility of information, the need for communication, and respect for different perspectives.

Hinduism[edit]

The Rigveda, dated to have been composed between 1500 and 1200 BCE, states "Reality is one, though wise men speak of it variously." According to Paul J. Griffiths, this premise is the foundation of universalist perspective behind the parable of the blind men and an elephant. The hymn asserts that the same Reality is subject to interpretations and described in various ways by the wise.[3] In the oldest version, four blind men walk into a forest where they meet an elephant. In this version, they do not fight with each other, but conclude that they each must have perceived a different beast although they experienced the same elephant.[3] The expanded version of the parable occurs in various ancient and Hindu texts. Many scholars refer to it as a Hindu parable.[6][2][7]

The parable or references appear in bhasya (commentaries, secondary literature) in the Hindu traditions. For example, Adi Shankara mentions it in his bhasya on verse 5.18.1 of the Chandogya Upanishad as follows:

etaddhasti darshana iva jatyandhah

Translation: That is like people blind by birth in/when viewing an elephant.

— Adi Shankara, Translator: Hans Henrich Hock[8]

Jainism[edit]

Seven blind men and an elephant parable at a Jain temple

The medieval era Jain texts explain the concepts of anekāntavāda (or "many-sidedness") and syādvāda ("conditioned viewpoints") with the parable of the blind men and an elephant (Andhgajanyāyah), which addresses the manifold nature of truth. For example, this parable are found in Tattvarthaslokavatika of Vidyanandi (9th century) and Syādvādamanjari of Ācārya Mallisena (13th century). Mallisena uses the parable to argue that immature people deny various aspects of truth; deluded by the aspects they do understand, they deny the aspects they don't understand. "Due to extreme delusion produced on account of a partial viewpoint, the immature deny one aspect and try to establish another. This is the maxim of the blind (men) and the elephant."[9] Mallisena also cites the parable when noting the importance of considering all viewpoints in obtaining a full picture of reality. "It is impossible to properly understand an entity consisting of infinite properties without the method of modal description consisting of all viewpoints, since it will otherwise lead to a situation of seizing mere sprouts (i.e., a superficial, inadequate cognition), on the maxim of the blind (men) and the elephant."[10]

Buddhism[edit]

Blind monks examining an elephant, an ukiyo-e print by Hanabusa Itchō (1652–1724).

The Buddha twice uses the simile of blind men led astray. The earliest known version occurs in the text Udana 6.4.[4][11]

In the Canki Sutta he describes a row of blind men holding on to each other as an example of those who follow an old text that has passed down from generation to generation.[12] In the Udana (68–69)[13] he uses the elephant parable to describe sectarian quarrels. A king has the blind men of the capital brought to the palace, where an elephant is brought in and they are asked to describe it.

When the blind men had each felt a part of the elephant, the king went to each of them and said to each: 'Well, blind man, have you seen the elephant? Tell me, what sort of thing is an elephant?'

The men assert the elephant is either like a pot (the blind man who felt the elephant's head), a winnowing basket (ear), a plowshare (tusk), a plow (trunk), a granary (body), a pillar (foot), a mortar (back), a pestle (tail) or a brush (tip of the tail).

The men cannot agree with one another and come to blows over the question of what it is like and their dispute delights the king. The Buddha ends the story by comparing the blind men to preachers and scholars who are blind and ignorant and hold to their own views: "Just so are these preachers and scholars holding various views blind and unseeing.... In their ignorance they are by nature quarrelsome, wrangling, and disputatious, each maintaining reality is thus and thus." The Buddha then speaks the following verse:

O how they cling and wrangle, some who claim
For preacher and monk the honored name!
For, quarreling, each to his view they cling.
Such folk see only one side of a thing.[14]

Sufism[edit]

Blind men and the elephant.

The Persian Sufi poet Sanai of Ghazni (currently, Afghanistan) presented this teaching story in his The Walled Garden of Truth.[15]

Rumi, the 13th Century Persian poet and teacher of Sufism, included it in his Masnavi. In his retelling, "The Elephant in the Dark", some Hindus bring an elephant to be exhibited in a dark room. A number of men touch and feel the elephant in the dark and, depending upon where they touch it, they believe the elephant to be like a water spout (trunk), a fan (ear), a pillar (leg) and a throne (back). Rumi uses this story as an example of the limits of individual perception:

The sensual eye is just like the palm of the hand. The palm has not the means of covering the whole of the beast.[16]

Rumi does not present a resolution to the conflict in his version, but states:

The eye of the Sea is one thing and the foam another. Let the foam go, and gaze with the eye of the Sea. Day and night foam-flecks are flung from the sea: oh amazing! You behold the foam but not the Sea. We are like boats dashing together; our eyes are darkened, yet we are in clear water.[16]

Rumi ends his poem by stating "If each had a candle and they went in together the differences would disappear." [17]

John Godfrey Saxe[edit]

One of the most famous versions of the 19th century was the poem "The Blind Men and the Elephant" by John Godfrey Saxe (1816–1887).

And so these men of Indostan
Disputed loud and long,
Each in his own opinion
Exceeding stiff and strong,
Though each was partly in the right
And all were in the wrong!

The poem begins:

It was six men of Indostan
    To learning much inclined,
Who went to see the Elephant
    (Though all of them were blind),
That each by observation
    Might satisfy his mind[18]

Each in his own opinion concludes that the elephant is like a wall, snake, spear, tree, fan or rope, depending upon where they had touched. Their heated debate comes short of physical violence, but the conflict is never resolved.

    Moral:
So oft in theologic wars,
    The disputants, I ween,
Rail on in utter ignorance
    Of what each other mean,
And prate about an Elephant
    Not one of them has seen!

Natalie Merchant sang this poem in full on her Leave Your Sleep album (Disc 1, track 13).

Modern treatments[edit]

The story is seen as a metaphor in many disciplines, being pressed into service as an analogy in fields well beyond the traditional. In physics, it has been seen as an analogy for the wave–particle duality.[19] In biology, the way the blind men hold onto different parts of the elephant has been seen as a good analogy for the Polyclonal B cell response.[20]

"Blind men and elephant", from Martha Adelaide Holton & Charles Madison Curry, Holton-Curry readers, 1914.

The fable is one of a number of tales that cast light on the response of hearers or readers to the story itself. Idries Shah has commented on this element of self-reference in the many interpretations of the story, and its function as a teaching story:

...people address themselves to this story in one or more [...] interpretations. They then accept or reject them. Now they can feel happy; they have arrived at an opinion about the matter. According to their conditioning they produce the answer. Now look at their answers. Some will say that this is a fascinating and touching allegory of the presence of God. Others will say that it is showing people how stupid mankind can be. Some say it is anti-scholastic. Others that it is just a tale copied by Rumi from Sanai – and so on.[21]

Shah adapted the tale in his book The Dermis Probe. This version begins with a conference of scientists, from different fields of expertise, presenting their conflicting conclusions on the material upon which a camera is focused. As the camera slowly zooms out it gradually becomes clear that the material under examination is the hide of an African elephant. The words 'The Parts Are Greater Than The Whole' then appear on the screen. This retelling formed the script for a short four-minute film by the animator Richard Williams. The film was chosen as an Outstanding Film of the Year and was exhibited at the London and New York film festivals.[22][23]

The story enjoys a continuing appeal, as shown by the number of illustrated children's books of the fable; there is one for instance by Paul Galdone and another, Seven Blind Mice, by Ed Young (1992).

In the title cartoon of one of his books, cartoonist Sam Gross postulated that one of the blind men, encountering a pile of the elephant's fewmets, concluded that "An elephant is soft and mushy."

An elephant joke inverts the story in the following way:

Six blind elephants were discussing what men were like. After arguing they decided to find one and determine what it was like by direct experience. The first blind elephant felt the man and declared, 'Men are flat.' After the other blind elephants felt the man, they agreed.

Moral:

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature in itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning.

Touching the Elephant was a 1997 BBC Radio 4 documentary in which four people of varying ages, all blind from birth, were brought to London Zoo to touch an elephant and describe their response.[24][25][26][27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ E. Bruce Goldstein (2010). Encyclopedia of Perception. SAGE Publications. p. 492. ISBN 978-1-4129-4081-8. , Quote: The ancient Hindu parable of the six blind men and the elephant...."
  2. ^ a b c C.R. Snyder; Carol E. Ford (2013). Coping with Negative Life Events: Clinical and Social Psychological Perspectives. Springer Science. p. 12. ISBN 978-1-4757-9865-4. 
  3. ^ a b c d Paul J. Griffiths (2007). An Apology for Apologetics: A Study in the Logic of Interreligious Dialogue. Wipf and Stock. pp. 46–47. ISBN 978-1-55635-731-2. 
  4. ^ a b c d John D. Ireland (2007). Udana and the Itivuttaka: Two Classics from the Pali Canon. Buddhist Publication Society. pp. 9, 81–84. ISBN 978-955-24-0164-0. 
  5. ^ Martin Gardner (1 September 1995). Famous Poems from Bygone Days. Courier Dover Publications. p. 124. ISBN 978-0-486-28623-5. Retrieved 2012-08-25. 
  6. ^ a b c E. Bruce Goldstein (2010). Encyclopedia of Perception. SAGE Publications. p. 492. ISBN 978-1-4129-4081-8. 
  7. ^ [a] Chad Meister (2016). Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 11–12. ISBN 978-1-137-31475-8. ;
    [b] Jeremy P. Shapiro; Robert D. Friedberg; Karen K. Bardenstein (2006). Child and Adolescent Therapy: Science and Art. Wiley. pp. 269, 314. ISBN 978-0-471-38637-7. ;
    [c] Peter B. Clarke; Peter Beyer (2009). The World's Religions: Continuities and Transformations. Taylor & Francis. pp. 470–471. ISBN 978-1-135-21100-4. 
  8. ^ Hans H Hock (2005). Edwin Francis Bryant and Laurie L. Patton, ed. The Indo-Aryan Controversy: Evidence and Inference in Indian History. Routledge. p. 282. ISBN 978-0-7007-1463-6. 
  9. ^ Mallisena, Syādvādamanjari, 14:103–104. Dhruva, A.B. (1933) pp. 9–10.
  10. ^ Mallisena, Syādvādamanjari, 19:75–77. Dhruva, A.B. (1933) pp. 23–25.
  11. ^ Gomez, Luis O. (1976). "Proto-Madhyamika in the Pali Canon". Philosophy East and West. Univ of Hawaii Press. 26 (2): 164 note 73; 137–165. doi:10.2307/1398186. 
  12. ^ Accesstoinsight.org Archived 2006-06-28 at the Wayback Machine.
  13. ^ Katinkahesselink.net
  14. ^ Wang, Randy. "The Blind Men and the Elephant". Retrieved 2006-08-29. 
  15. ^ Included in Idries Shah, Tales of the Dervishes ISBN 0-900860-47-2 Octagon Press 1993.
  16. ^ a b Arberry, A.J. (2004-05-09). "71 – The Elephant in the dark, on the reconciliation of contrarieties". Rumi – Tales from Masnavi. Retrieved 2006-08-29. 
  17. ^ For an adaptation of Rumi's poem, see this song version by David Wilcox here Archived October 9, 2010, at the Wayback Machine..
  18. ^ Saxe, John Godfrey. "Wikisource link to The Blind Men and the Elephant". The poems of John Godfrey Saxe. Wikisource.  Wikisource link [scan]
  19. ^ For example, Quantum theory by David Bohm, p. 26. Retrieved 2010-03-03.
  20. ^ See for instance The lymph node in HIV pathogenesis by Michael M. Lederman and Leonid Margolis, Seminars in Immunology, Volume 20, Issue 3, June 2008, pp. 187–195.
  21. ^ Shah, Idries. "The Teaching Story: Observations on the Folklore of Our "Modern" Thought". Retrieved 2010-03-05. 
  22. ^ Octagon Press page for The Dermis Probe Archived July 26, 2011, at the Wayback Machine., with preview of story
  23. ^ "touching the elephant". The Rockethouse. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  24. ^ "BBC Radio 4 Extra - 90 by 90 The Full Set, 1998: Touching The Elephant". BBC Online. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  25. ^ Elmes, Simon (2009-11-10). And Now on Radio 4: A Celebration of the World's Best Radio Station. Random House. p. 143. ISBN 9781407005287. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  26. ^ Hanks, Robert (3 January 1998). "Radio Review". The Independent. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  27. ^ Gaisford, Sue (19 April 1997). "Radio: Tony, John and Paddy: get thee to a nunnery". The Independent. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 

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