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Carrollton, Missouri
City
Aerial view of Carrollton, Missouri
Aerial view of Carrollton, Missouri
Location of Carrollton, Missouri
Location of Carrollton, Missouri
Coordinates: 39°21′32″N 93°29′44″W / 39.35889°N 93.49556°W / 39.35889; -93.49556Coordinates: 39°21′32″N 93°29′44″W / 39.35889°N 93.49556°W / 39.35889; -93.49556
Country United States
State Missouri
County Carroll
Government
 • Type Mayor-council
 • Mayor Bryan Mathis
Area[1]
 • Total 4.19 sq mi (10.85 km2)
 • Land 4.17 sq mi (10.80 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation 755 ft (230 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 3,784
 • Estimate (2016)[3] 3,603
 • Density 900/sq mi (350/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 64633
Area code(s) 660
FIPS code 29-11566[4]
GNIS feature ID 0715434[5]
Website Carrollton Area Chamber of Commerce

Carrollton is a city in Carroll County, Missouri, United States. Carrollton won the 2005 All-America City Award given out annually by the National Civic League. The population was 3,784 at the 2010 census. The population is down 338 residents since the last census, the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Carroll County.[6]

History[edit]

Carrollton was established in 1833.[7] It obtained its post office in 1834.[8] Carrollton's growth can be documented through Sanborn Maps, several of which are available online.[9]

The Carroll County Court House, Carroll County Sheriff's Quarters and Jail, United States Post Office, and Wilcoxson and Company Bank are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[10]

Geography[edit]

Carrollton is located at 39°22′N 93°30′W / 39.367°N 93.500°W / 39.367; -93.500 (39.3589, -93.4956).[11] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.19 square miles (10.85 km2), of which, 4.17 square miles (10.80 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 738
1870 1,832 148.2%
1880 2,313 26.3%
1890 3,878 67.7%
1900 3,854 −0.6%
1910 3,452 −10.4%
1920 3,218 −6.8%
1930 4,058 26.1%
1940 4,070 0.3%
1950 4,380 7.6%
1960 4,554 4.0%
1970 4,847 6.4%
1980 4,700 −3.0%
1990 4,406 −6.3%
2000 4,122 −6.4%
2010 3,784 −8.2%
Est. 2016 3,603 [3] −4.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 3,784 people,

Total population: 3,784

% of population.....

Under 5 years: 249 (6.6%);5 to 9 years: 243 (6.4%);10 to 14 years: 256 (6.8%); 15 to 19 years: 254 (6.7%); 20 to 24 years: 203 (5.4%); 25 to 29 years: 213 (5.6%); 30 to 34 years: 239 (6.3%); 35 to 39 years: 219 (5.8%); 40 to 44 years: 215 (5.7%); 45 to 49 years: 234 (6.2%); 50 to 54 years: 210 (5.5%); 55 to 59 years: 241 (6.4%); 60 to 64 years: 241 (6.4%); 65 to 69 years: 186 (4.9%); 70 to 74 years: 159 (4.2%); 75 to 79 years: 150 (4.0%); 80 to 84 years: 125 (3.3%); 85 years and over: 147 (3.9%)

Median age (years): 40.4

Population Summary

People 16 years and over: 2,975 (78.6%); 18 years and over: 2,867 (75.8%); 21 years and over: 2,733 (72.2%); 62 years and over: 912 (24.1%); 65 years and over: 767 (20.3%)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census.

Education[edit]

Carrollton R-VII School District operates Carrollton Area Career Center, Carrollton High School; grades 9-12, Carrollton Junior High School; grades 7-8, Carrollton Elementary School; grades 2-6, and Adams School; grades Pre-K-1.[13]

The town has a lending library, the Carrollton Public Library.[14]

Carroll County Courthouse

Notable people[edit]

  • Thomas Archibald, Colonel, US Army, Vietnam Veteran. 1958-1980. University Vice President, 1980-2002.
  • Amanda Austin, painter and sculptor[15]
  • Leon E. Bates UAW Leader
  • James H. Boyce, chairman of the Louisiana Republican Party from 1972 to 1976; born in Carrollton in 1922, died in Baton Rouge, 1990
  • James Johnson Duderstadt, President of the University of Michigan. 1988-1996
  • James Fergason, (January 12, 1934 – December 9, 2008) Graduated Carrollton High School in 1952. American inventor and business entrepreneur. A member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Best known for his work on an improved Liquid Crystal Display, or LCD. He held over one hundred U.S. patents at the time of his death.
  • Francis Doyle Gleeson, Roman Catholic bishop
  • Don Martin Defensive Back for Yale. Played in the NFL for the Buccaneers, Chiefs, and the Patriots, and coached in the NFL for the Oakland Raiders.
  • John C. McQueen, Major general, USMC; Decorated veteran of World War II, involved in the construction of Camp Lejeune and Camp Pendleton.
  • James Shields Civil War General and United States Senator
  • Robert Simpson (athlete) Robert Ingalls "Bob" Simpson (May 25, 1892 – November 10, 1974) was an American hurdler and track and field coach. Simpson set several world records in the 120 yd hurdles, equaled the world record in the 220 yd hurdles, and won two gold medals at the 1919 Inter-Allied Games. Simpson grew up on his family's farm in Bosworth, near Carrollton, Missouri. He was the oldest of three brothers and part of a track and field family. His younger brothers John Simpson and Chauncey Simpson followed him in the sport, as did his cousin, William Sylvester.
  • Claude T. Smith American band conductor, composer, and educator.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-14. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ "Carroll County Place Names, 1928–1945 (archived)". The State Historical Society of Missouri. Archived from the original on 24 June 2016. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  8. ^ Earngey, Bill (1995). Missouri Roadsides: The Traveler's Companion. University of Missouri Press. p. 38. 
  9. ^ Sanborn Maps for Missouri: Carrollton, University of Missouri Digital Library. Accessed 2011-03-14
  10. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Schools". Carrollton R-VII School District. Retrieved 23 March 2018. 
  14. ^ "Missouri Public Libraries". PublicLibraries.com. Retrieved 23 March 2018. 
  15. ^ Eleanor Tufts; National Museum of Women in the Arts (U.S.); International Exhibitions Foundation (1987). American women artists, 1830–1930. International Exhibitions Foundation for the National Museum of Women in the Arts. ISBN 978-0-940979-01-7. 

External links[edit]

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