Happy Thoughts, Happy Life
1
CHILI CON CARNE - H1Z1 Battle Royale #9
CHILI CON CARNE - H1Z1 Battle Royale #9
DATE: 2015/05/04::
2
HOW TO MAKE CHILLI CON CARNE
HOW TO MAKE CHILLI CON CARNE
DATE: 2013/02/20::
3
Marco Pierre White Cooks Chilli Con Carne
Marco Pierre White Cooks Chilli Con Carne
DATE: 2012/10/16::
4
EXTREME Chilli Con Carne | DJ BBQ
EXTREME Chilli Con Carne | DJ BBQ
DATE: 2013/08/20::
5
Chili con Carne - New Version - The Real Group
Chili con Carne - New Version - The Real Group
DATE: 2008/11/19::
6
Chili Con Carne How to make recipe
Chili Con Carne How to make recipe
DATE: 2010/11/05::
7
AWARD WINNING CHILI CON CARNE RECIPE
AWARD WINNING CHILI CON CARNE RECIPE
DATE: 2013/02/17::
8
Chili con Carne
Chili con Carne
DATE: 2012/07/16::
9
How To Make Carne con Chile
How To Make Carne con Chile
DATE: 2013/02/05::
10
How to Make Texan Chili con Carne, Part 1
How to Make Texan Chili con Carne, Part 1
DATE: 2013/10/21::
11
Chili Con Carne || Around the World: Mexican Dinner || Gastrolab
Chili Con Carne || Around the World: Mexican Dinner || Gastrolab
DATE: 2013/11/16::
12
Chili Con Carne Recipe for Students
Chili Con Carne Recipe for Students
DATE: 2013/09/12::
13
CHILLI CON CARNE RECIPE - SORTED
CHILLI CON CARNE RECIPE - SORTED
DATE: 2012/02/21::
14
Best Chilli Con Carne Recipe
Best Chilli Con Carne Recipe
DATE: 2012/04/17::
15
Chili con Carne
Chili con Carne
DATE: 2013/08/10::
16
Chili Con Carne - The Real Group
Chili Con Carne - The Real Group
DATE: 2008/11/18::
17
CHILLI CON CARNE: Heston Blumenthal Cookbook
CHILLI CON CARNE: Heston Blumenthal Cookbook
DATE: 2014/11/25::
18
CHILLI CON CARNE RECIPE IN 30 MINUTES, AUTHENTIC MEXICAN RECIPE
CHILLI CON CARNE RECIPE IN 30 MINUTES, AUTHENTIC MEXICAN RECIPE
DATE: 2013/01/05::
19
Chili con carne - Foodgloss
Chili con carne - Foodgloss
DATE: 2014/04/27::
20
CHILI CON CARNE WITH DRY AGED BEEF AND GUINNES BEER | ROCK
CHILI CON CARNE WITH DRY AGED BEEF AND GUINNES BEER | ROCK'N'BBQ SEASON 1
DATE: 2013/02/06::
21
Jak zrobić Chili con carne
Jak zrobić Chili con carne
DATE: 2012/01/21::
22
Verdammt lecker Nachschlag für Adam Richman - Chili con Carne in Springfield
Verdammt lecker Nachschlag für Adam Richman - Chili con Carne in Springfield
DATE: 2013/06/02::
23
Fabrizio "Chili Con Carne"
Fabrizio "Chili Con Carne"
DATE: 2013/11/10::
24
Chili Con Carne Motion Graphic
Chili Con Carne Motion Graphic
DATE: 2014/05/20::
25
Chilli cook off Challenge -  Gordon Ramsay
Chilli cook off Challenge - Gordon Ramsay
DATE: 2011/03/04::
26
CantAnima - Chili con carne - Anders Edenroth (The Real Group)
CantAnima - Chili con carne - Anders Edenroth (The Real Group)
DATE: 2009/04/21::
27
Buntes CHILI CON CARNE | amerikanische Küche
Buntes CHILI CON CARNE | amerikanische Küche
DATE: 2014/06/05::
28
Chili con carne. Wie kocht man ein richtig gutes Chili con carne.
Chili con carne. Wie kocht man ein richtig gutes Chili con carne.
DATE: 2013/08/12::
29
Teil 25 - Chili con Carne (Kleine Küche Große Träume)
Teil 25 - Chili con Carne (Kleine Küche Große Träume)
DATE: 2013/01/08::
30
Mitt kök: Chili con carne - Nyhetsmorgon (TV4)
Mitt kök: Chili con carne - Nyhetsmorgon (TV4)
DATE: 2014/02/17::
31
Chili con carne alias chilis bab
Chili con carne alias chilis bab
DATE: 2015/04/10::
32
Recette du Chili Con Carne / Chili Con Carne recipe - English subtitles - 750 Grammes
Recette du Chili Con Carne / Chili Con Carne recipe - English subtitles - 750 Grammes
DATE: 2013/01/21::
33
Chili con carne
Chili con carne
DATE: 2013/12/02::
34
De dagschotel - Chili Con Carne
De dagschotel - Chili Con Carne
DATE: 2014/02/20::
35
Comment faire un "CHILI CON CARNE"  maison facilement?
Comment faire un "CHILI CON CARNE" maison facilement?
DATE: 2015/01/16::
36
Chili con Carne | A Maravilhosa Cozinha de Jack S02E04
Chili con Carne | A Maravilhosa Cozinha de Jack S02E04
DATE: 2013/03/15::
37
Nr. 034 Chili con Carne aus dem Dutchoven - Klaus grillt
Nr. 034 Chili con Carne aus dem Dutchoven - Klaus grillt
DATE: 2014/08/25::
38
BBC   Food   Recipes   How to make chilli con carne
BBC Food Recipes How to make chilli con carne
DATE: 2013/12/22::
39
Tot op het Bot - De chili con carne van Johan Segers
Tot op het Bot - De chili con carne van Johan Segers
DATE: 2014/03/07::
40
SPECIALE CHILI CON CARNE: LA GRANDE SFIDA ... CURIOSI DI VEDERE IL RISULATATO?
SPECIALE CHILI CON CARNE: LA GRANDE SFIDA ... CURIOSI DI VEDERE IL RISULATATO?
DATE: 2013/10/18::
41
Receta: Chili con Carne - La Cocinadera
Receta: Chili con Carne - La Cocinadera
DATE: 2012/09/04::
42
Beef Brisket Chili con Carne - BBQ Grill Rezept Video - Die Grillshow 119
Beef Brisket Chili con Carne - BBQ Grill Rezept Video - Die Grillshow 119
DATE: 2015/01/11::
43
chilli con carne selbstgemacht
chilli con carne selbstgemacht
DATE: 2014/03/14::
44
CHILLI CON CARNE MEXICKÉ RECEPT DO 30 MINUT!!! MEXICKÁ KUCHYNÉ
CHILLI CON CARNE MEXICKÉ RECEPT DO 30 MINUT!!! MEXICKÁ KUCHYNÉ
DATE: 2013/01/05::
45
Atemlos Parodie... Chili con Carne xDD
Atemlos Parodie... Chili con Carne xDD
DATE: 2014/09/11::
46
Recette : Chili con carne facile !
Recette : Chili con carne facile !
DATE: 2013/01/26::
47
Chili Con Carne Recipe - Mark
Chili Con Carne Recipe - Mark's Cuisine #54
DATE: 2013/04/26::
48
Chili con "Carne": Raw Vegan Superfood Recipe
Chili con "Carne": Raw Vegan Superfood Recipe
DATE: 2013/07/03::
49
How to Make Classic Chilli Con Carne - Allegra McEvedy & Paul Merrett
How to Make Classic Chilli Con Carne - Allegra McEvedy & Paul Merrett
DATE: 2013/05/08::
50
Sotta ja pytty - Chili con carne
Sotta ja pytty - Chili con carne
DATE: 2011/10/13::
NEXT >>
RESULTS [51 .. 101]
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Chili con carne
Pot-o-chili.jpg
A pot of chili con carne with whole green hot chilis, kidney beans and tomatoes.
Alternative names Chili, Chili con carne
Course Main
Place of origin unknown
Main ingredients Chili peppers, meat, tomatoes, often made with beans
Variations Multiple
Cookbook:Chili con carne  Chili con carne

Chili con carne (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈt͡ʃile koŋ ˈkarne]; English: chili with meat), commonly known in American English as simply "chili", is a spicy stew containing chili peppers, meat (usually beef), and often tomatoes and beans. Other seasonings may include garlic, onions, and cumin. Variations, both geographic and personal, involve different types of meat and ingredients. Recipes provoke disputes among aficionados, some of whom insist that the word “chili” applies only to the basic dish, without beans and tomatoes. Chili is a frequent dish for cook-offs, and is used as an ingredient in other dishes.

Origins and history[edit]

In Spanish, the word chile from the Nahuatl "chīlli" refers to a “chili pepper”, and carne is Spanish for “meat”.

The original recipe consisted of dried beef, suet, dried chili peppers and salt, which were pounded together, formed into bricks and left to dry, which could then be boiled in pots on the trail.[citation needed]

The San Antonio Chili Stand, in operation at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, helped people taste and appreciate chili. San Antonio was a tourist destination and helped Texas-style chili con carne spread throughout the South and West.[1] Chili con carne is the official dish of the U.S. state of Texas as designated by the House Concurrent Resolution Number 18 of the 65th Texas Legislature during its regular session in 1977.[2]

Chili parlors[edit]

Before World War II, hundreds of small, family-run chili parlors (also known as “chili joints”) could be found throughout Texas and other states, particularly those in which émigré Texans had made new homes. Each establishment usually had a claim to some kind of secret recipe.

A bowl of chili con carne and tortilla chips.

As early as 1904, chili parlors were opening outside of Texas. After working at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Charles Taylor opened a chili parlor in Carlinville, Illinois, serving "Mexican Chili".[3] In the 1920s and 1930s chains of diner-style "chili parlors" grew up in the Midwest.

Cincinnati-style chili arguably represents the most vibrant continuation of the chili parlor tradition, with dozens of restaurants offering this style throughout the Cincinnati area. It can be traced back to at least 1922, when the original Empress Chili location opened.[4]

In Green Bay, Wisconsin, the chili parlor Chili John's has existed since 1913. As with Cincinnati chili, it is most commonly served over spaghetti with oyster crackers, but the recipe is less sweet with a higher proportion of fat.[5] The original proprietor's son opened a second location in Burbank in 1946, which is also still in existence.[6]

Until the late 2000s, a chili parlor dating to 1904, O.T. Hodge, continued to operate in St. Louis. It featured a chili-topped dish called a "slinger": two cheeseburger patties, hash browns, and two eggs, and smothered in chili.[7] As of 2014 no O.T. Hodge-branded locations remain, though one still exists under the name Chili Mac's.[8]

One of the best-known Texas chili parlors, in part because of its downtown location and socially connected clientele, was Bob Pool's "joint" in Dallas, across the street from the headquarters of the elite department store Neiman Marcus. Stanley Marcus, president of the store, frequently ate there. He also bought Pool's chili to send by air express to friends and customers across the country. Several members of General Dwight Eisenhower's SHAPE staff during the early 1950s were reported to have arranged regular shipments of chili from Pool's to their Paris quarters.

Controversy over ingredients[edit]

Ingredients for chili con carne.

Beans[edit]

Beans, a staple of Tex-Mex cuisine, have been associated with chili as far back as the early 20th century.[9] The question of whether beans "belong" in chili has been a matter of contention among chili cooks for a long time. While it is generally accepted that the earliest chilis did not include beans, proponents of their inclusion contend that chili with beans has a long enough history so as to not be considered "inauthentic."[10] The Chili Appreciation Society International specified in 1999 that, among other things, cooks are forbidden to include beans in the preparation of chili for official competition—nor are they allowed to marinate any meats.[11]

A bowl of Texas-style chili without beans.

"Texas-style chili" may or may not contain beans and may even be made without other vegetables whatsoever besides chili peppers.[12] President Lyndon B. Johnson's favorite chili recipe became known as "Pedernales River chili" after the location of his Texas Hill Country ranch. It calls for eliminating the traditional beef suet (on Johnson's doctor's orders, after Johnson suffered a heart attack while he was Senate Majority Leader) and adds tomatoes and onions. Johnson preferred venison, when available, to beef, as Hill Country deer are leaner than most beef.[13] Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady, had the recipe printed on cards to be mailed out because of the many thousands of requests the White House received for it.[14]

In some areas, specifically the American South, versions with beans are referred to as "chili beans" while the term "chili" is reserved for the all-meat dish. Small red beans are commonly used for chili, as are black-eyed peas, kidney beans, great northern beans, or navy beans. Chili bean can refer to a small red variety of common bean also known as the pink bean. The name may have arisen from that bean's resemblance to small chili peppers, or it may be a reference to that bean's inclusion in chili recipes.

Most commercially prepared canned chili includes beans. Commercial chili prepared without beans is usually called "chili no beans" in the United States. Some U.S. manufacturers, notably Bush Brothers and Company and Eden Organic, also sell canned precooked beans (without meat) that are labeled "chili beans"; these beans are intended for consumers to add to a chili recipe and are often sold with spices added.

Tomatoes[edit]

Tomatoes are another ingredient on which opinions differ. Wick Fowler, north Texas newspaperman and inventor of "Two-Alarm Chili" (which he later marketed as a "kit" of spices), insisted on adding tomato sauce to his chili — one 15-oz. can per three pounds of meat. He also believed that chili should never be eaten freshly cooked but refrigerated overnight to seal in the flavor. Matt Weinstock, a Los Angeles newspaper columnist, once remarked that Fowler's chili "was reputed to open eighteen sinus cavities unknown to the medical profession."[15]

Variations[edit]

Vegetarian chili[edit]

Pot of chili sin carne.

Vegetarian chili (also known as chili sin carne, chili without meat, chili non carne, and chili sans carne) acquired wide popularity in the U.S. during the 1960s and 1970s with the rise of vegetarianism. It is also popular with those on a diet restricting the use of red meat. To make the chili vegetarian, the cook leaves out the meat or replaces it with a meat analogue, such as textured vegetable protein or tofu, or a starchy vegetable, such as potatoes. These chilis nearly always include beans. Variants may contain corn, squash, mushrooms, or beets.

Chili verde[edit]

Chili verde (green chili) is a moderately to extremely spicy New Mexican cuisine stew or sauce usually made from chunks of pork that have been slow-cooked in chicken broth, garlic, tomatillos, and roasted green chilis. Tomatoes are rarely used.[citation needed] The spiciness of the chili is adjusted with poblano, jalapeño, serrano, and occasionally habanero peppers. Chili verde is a common filling for the Mission burrito.

White chili[edit]

White chili is made using white beans and turkey meat or chicken breast instead of a tomato-based sauce and red meat (beef). The resulting dish appears white when cooked.

Accompaniments and additions[edit]

Chili with garnishes and tortilla chips
Chili con carne with mashed corn served in Austria.

The dish may be served with toppings or accompaniments; grated cheese, diced onions, and sour cream are common toppings, as are broken saltine crackers, corn chips, cornbread, rolled-up corn or flour tortillas, and pork tamales. Chili can also be served over rice or pasta such as ditalini or spaghetti.

Pre-made chili[edit]

Canned chili[edit]

Willie Gebhardt, originally of New Braunfels, Texas, and later of San Antonio, produced the first canned chili in 1908. Rancher Lyman Davis near Corsicana, Texas, developed Wolf Brand Chili in 1895. He owned a meat market and was a particular fan of Texas-style chili. In the 1880s, in partnership with an experienced range cook, he began producing heavily spiced chili based on chunks of lean beef and rendered beef suet, which he sold by the pot to local cafés. In 1921, Davis began canning his product, naming it for his pet wolf "Kaiser Bill". Wolf Brand canned chili was a favorite of Will Rogers, who always took along a case when traveling and performing in other regions of the world. Ernest Tubb, the country singer, was such a fan that one Texas hotel maintained a supply of Wolf Brand for his visits. Both the Gebhardt and Wolf brands are now owned by ConAgra Foods, Inc. Another major maker of canned chili, Hormel, sells chili available with or without beans, made with turkey or in vegetarian varieties, under their own name and other brands like Stagg.

Brick chili[edit]

Another method of marketing commercial chili in the days before widespread home refrigerators was "brick chili". It was produced by pressing out nearly all of the moisture, leaving a solid substance roughly the size and shape of a half-brick. Wolf Brand was originally sold in this form.[16] Commonly available in small towns and rural areas of the American Southwest in the first three-quarters of the 20th century, brick chili has mostly outlived its usefulness but can still be found in some stores.

Seasoning mix[edit]

Home cooks may also purchase seasoning mixes for chili, including packets of dry ingredients such as chili powder, masa flour, salt, and cayenne pepper, to flavor meat and other ingredients.

Other dishes made with chili[edit]

  • A chili dog is a hot dog served with a topping of chili (usually without beans).
  • A chili burger is a burger topped with chili (usually without beans). In California, this is sometimes referred to as a "chili size." Chili is also served on top of a ground beef patty alone.
  • Chili is also added to french fries and cheese to make chili cheese fries, or Coney Island fries.
  • In southeast Texas, some people eat chili served over white rice. Chili over rice (frequently with beans) is also common in Hawaii (where it is known as chili rice) and is eaten this way in the UK and, to some extent, Australia.
  • Chili mac is a dish made with canned chili, or roughly the same ingredients as chili (meat, spices, onion, tomato sauce, beans, and sometimes other vegetables), with the addition of macaroni or some other pasta. Chili mac is a standard dish in the U.S. military and is one of the varieties of Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE).
  • Cincinnati chili is a variety of chili frequently served over spaghetti and on fries and cheese coneys.
  • A "Frito pie" typically consists of a small, single-serving bag of Fritos corn chips with a cup of chili poured over the top, usually finished up with grated cheese or onions and jalapeños and sour cream.[17] Frito pies are popular in the southwestern United States.
  • A chili stuffed baked potato is a large baked potato stuffed with chili and possibly with other ingredients, such as butter, Cheddar cheese, or chopped onions.
  • Chili Poutine substitutes chili con carne for the usual gravy.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "History of Chili, Chili Con Carne". whatscookingamerica.net. 2004. Retrieved January 6, 2008. 
  2. ^ "State Dish - Chili." Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Retrieved on March 7, 2010.
  3. ^ "The First 100 Years", Taylorschili.com
  4. ^ Herrmann Loomis, Susan (April 16, 1989). "Fare of the County; A City's Romance With a Bowl of Chili". New York Times. Retrieved September 16, 2011. 
  5. ^ The Secret to Making Green Bay’s Own Chili John’s Style Chili in Your Kitchen
  6. ^ Chili John's Burbank, CA : Food Network
  7. ^ O.T. Hodges Menu, a "chili parlor" in Ferguson, MO in business since 1904.
  8. ^ is there a brick and mortar ot hodge chili parlor in st louis anymore?
  9. ^ Hill, Janet M. (June 1906). "Chili Con Carne" XI. Boston Cooking-School Magazine. pp. 400, 401. 
  10. ^ Albala, Ken. Beans: A History. Oxford:Berg, 2007 p. 178
  11. ^ Chili Appreciation Society International, Official CASI Rules & Guidelines October 1, 1999
  12. ^ International Chili Society, Official History of Chili October 1, 1999
  13. ^ Aidoo, Kofi E.; Haworth, Richard J. P. (1995). "Nutritional and chemical composition of farmed venison". Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics 8 (6): 441–6. doi:10.1111/j.1365-277X.1995.tb00339.x. 
  14. ^ "Chili recipe", LBJ Library, University of Texas
  15. ^ Tolbert, A Bowl of Red
  16. ^ Tommy W. Stringer, "WOLF BRAND CHILI," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/diw01), accessed March 6, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.
  17. ^ "Austin City Limits Festival Food Rocks!". Slashfood. 2007. Retrieved September 27, 2007. 

References[edit]

  • Frank X. Tolbert. A Bowl of Red: A Natural History of Chili con Carne. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1966. [Much of the material in this book originally appeared in the author's newspaper columns in The Dallas Morning News beginning in the early 1950s.]
  • Charles Ramsdell. San Antonio: An Historical and Pictorial Guide. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1959.
  • Joe E. Cooper. With or Without Beans. Dallas: W. S. Henson, 1952.
  • H. Allen Smith. "Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do." Reprinted at the International Chili Society web site.
  • Jack Arnold. The Chili Lover's Handbook. Privately published, 1977.
  • Robb Walsh. The Tex-Mex Cookbook: A History in Recipes and Photos. New York: Broadway Books, 2004. [A very knowledgeable and very well-written "food history", including a long chapter on "real" chili, chili joints, and the San Antonio chili queens.]
  • Fr. Michael Muller. The Catholic Dogma, 1888

External links[edit]

Wikipedia content is licensed under the GFDL License
Powered by YouTube
MASHPEDIA
LEGAL
  • Mashpedia © 2015