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WATCH: Beautiful Chuppah of Malia Weiss and Tzvi Reichman
WATCH: Beautiful Chuppah of Malia Weiss and Tzvi Reichman
Published: 2017/01/06
Channel: Simcha Spot
Rak Simcha Orchestra Presents: Chuppah Simcha Leiner & Meshorerim Choir
Rak Simcha Orchestra Presents: Chuppah Simcha Leiner & Meshorerim Choir
Published: 2013/10/16
Channel: shiezoli
The Freilach Band Chuppah Series - Maskil L
The Freilach Band Chuppah Series - Maskil L'Dovid & Mi Bon Siach ft. Avrum Chaim Green, Shira Choir
Published: 2017/02/13
Channel: Freilach Band
Freilach Band Chuppah Series - Achas & Mi Bon (Mona) - Moti Ilowitz, Avrum Chaim Green & Shira Choir
Freilach Band Chuppah Series - Achas & Mi Bon (Mona) - Moti Ilowitz, Avrum Chaim Green & Shira Choir
Published: 2017/06/25
Channel: Freilach Band
"A Magnificent Chuppah" Motty Ilowitz & Meshorerim Choir - Shimmy Levy Productions
"A Magnificent Chuppah" Motty Ilowitz & Meshorerim Choir - Shimmy Levy Productions
Published: 2015/10/28
Channel: shiezoli
"Rechnitz Chuppah" 36 pc Shira Orchestra Conducted by Yitzy Schwartz - Simcha Leiner & Shira Choir
"Rechnitz Chuppah" 36 pc Shira Orchestra Conducted by Yitzy Schwartz - Simcha Leiner & Shira Choir
Published: 2015/12/12
Channel: shiezoli
Make a Chuppah How-To
Make a Chuppah How-To
Published: 2013/06/12
Channel: You Can Build That
MBD Burech Habu at yeedle
MBD Burech Habu at yeedle's daughter chuppah
Published: 2017/03/24
Channel: אוודאאא Avadaaa
Hartzig Chuppah - Shloime Daskal, The A Team & Meshorerim Choir _ חופה עם שלומי דסקל ומקהלת משוררים
Hartzig Chuppah - Shloime Daskal, The A Team & Meshorerim Choir _ חופה עם שלומי דסקל ומקהלת משוררים
Published: 2017/06/18
Channel: A Team Orchestra
Mordechai Shapiro & Yedidim - Chupah - Aaron Teitelbaum Production | מרדכי שפירו וידידים - חופה
Mordechai Shapiro & Yedidim - Chupah - Aaron Teitelbaum Production | מרדכי שפירו וידידים - חופה
Published: 2014/12/14
Channel: shiezoli
Hannah & Alon
Hannah & Alon's chuppah - music by Netanel Kuperman
Published: 2012/01/08
Channel: Hanlon1204
Chuppah: The Jewish Wedding Canopy
Chuppah: The Jewish Wedding Canopy
Published: 2014/10/23
Channel: BimBam
Shwekey by Chuppah of Yaakov and Esty Rosenberg
Shwekey by Chuppah of Yaakov and Esty Rosenberg
Published: 2016/01/06
Channel: Simcha Spot
Wedding and Chuppah in Rostov, Russia
Wedding and Chuppah in Rostov, Russia
Published: 2015/02/14
Channel: JewishRostov
Batsheva Leibtag & Jeff Ritholtz - cHUPPAH PART 2
Batsheva Leibtag & Jeff Ritholtz - cHUPPAH PART 2
Published: 2011/12/28
Channel: Shana Cohen
An Enchanting Chuppah an Aaron Teitelbaum Production
An Enchanting Chuppah an Aaron Teitelbaum Production
Published: 2011/07/03
Channel: shiezoli
JJ
JJ's Chuppah in Times Square
Published: 2017/05/18
Channel: BDener
Chuppah: Why the Tent?
Chuppah: Why the Tent?
Published: 2012/05/14
Channel: AishVideo
Time lapse of chuppah set up for a wedding ceremony by the Frugal Flower
Time lapse of chuppah set up for a wedding ceremony by the Frugal Flower
Published: 2015/08/25
Channel: The Frugal Flower
InJoy Productions- Jewish Wedding Ceremony (Chuppah)
InJoy Productions- Jewish Wedding Ceremony (Chuppah)
Published: 2016/09/19
Channel: InJoy Productions
Ohad Moskowitz Singing A Chuppah Aaron Teitelbaum Production
Ohad Moskowitz Singing A Chuppah Aaron Teitelbaum Production
Published: 2012/08/19
Channel: shiezoli
Musical Theatre Fans Will Love This Broadway-Themed Chuppah
Musical Theatre Fans Will Love This Broadway-Themed Chuppah
Published: 2017/01/17
Channel: Simcha Spot Viral
Meet the Parents (5/10) Movie CLIP - Kevin the Ex (2000) HD
Meet the Parents (5/10) Movie CLIP - Kevin the Ex (2000) HD
Published: 2011/05/30
Channel: Movieclips
DIY Chuppah Pole Stands Outtake
DIY Chuppah Pole Stands Outtake
Published: 2014/08/14
Channel: Sew Jewish
Meheira - Chuppah Ceremony
Meheira - Chuppah Ceremony
Published: 2015/10/15
Channel: Sensation Band
Shloime Gertner at a Chuppah in Zurich
Shloime Gertner at a Chuppah in Zurich
Published: 2009/10/17
Channel: Mayor
Kule Wedding Chuppah w Yehuda Green
Kule Wedding Chuppah w Yehuda Green
Published: 2014/05/30
Channel: jon
hatan, Jewish wedding in Israel, chuppah Welkam Photo&Video
hatan, Jewish wedding in Israel, chuppah Welkam Photo&Video
Published: 2014/11/24
Channel: давид шор
Rechnitz Wedding - Chuppah
Rechnitz Wedding - Chuppah
Published: 2014/02/21
Channel: malkyben
Shmueli Ungar Performing a chuppah with zemiros choir
Shmueli Ungar Performing a chuppah with zemiros choir
Published: 2015/11/05
Channel: Jewish Music
Chuppah Song - Mi Von Siach, sung by Eli Tamir - Edwin & Suzy
Chuppah Song - Mi Von Siach, sung by Eli Tamir - Edwin & Suzy's Wedding
Published: 2014/11/16
Channel: Edwin & Suzy
Alter Rebbe
Alter Rebbe's Niggun Chabad Lubavitch Chuppah Song
Published: 2015/10/11
Channel: Tali Yess
Aaron and Jomi
Aaron and Jomi's Wedding, Chuppah Ceremony Part 1
Published: 2014/10/17
Channel: Aaron Draper
Shmueli sings at a Chuppah, Mi Bon Siach
Shmueli sings at a Chuppah, Mi Bon Siach
Published: 2014/03/30
Channel: Shmueli Music
Joshua Nesbitt Playing at a Chuppah at the Langham Hotel
Joshua Nesbitt Playing at a Chuppah at the Langham Hotel
Published: 2013/08/27
Channel: Josh Nesbitt
Amazing Jewish ceremony,Chuppah
Amazing Jewish ceremony,Chuppah
Published: 2013/01/16
Channel: Online videos from Israel, Middle East & Jewish World
Shai Barak - Boi Kallah chuppah song (Original version by Leonard Cohen)
Shai Barak - Boi Kallah chuppah song (Original version by Leonard Cohen)
Published: 2015/11/18
Channel: שי ברק
Chuppah | Ronit
Chuppah | Ronit's Farm| Israel | Chazzan Moshe Caplan
Published: 2016/12/07
Channel: akivmo
Short & Sweet: Sukkot and The Chuppah Effect
Short & Sweet: Sukkot and The Chuppah Effect
Published: 2014/10/13
Channel: Rabbi Bregman
Avi perets  - chuppah ceremony
Avi perets - chuppah ceremony
Published: 2010/08/25
Channel: TheMap18
Stunning Chuppah of Deena & Isaac Jacobson
Stunning Chuppah of Deena & Isaac Jacobson
Published: 2016/11/29
Channel: Simcha Spot Viral
Meltzer Family Chuppah 4/27/17
Meltzer Family Chuppah 4/27/17
Published: 2017/04/28
Channel: Nachum Hurvitz
Wedding of Lipa & Ayelet Hashachar Deutsch - Chuppah - P1 - חתונת ליפא ואילת השחר דייטש - חופה
Wedding of Lipa & Ayelet Hashachar Deutsch - Chuppah - P1 - חתונת ליפא ואילת השחר דייטש - חופה
Published: 2016/06/12
Channel: Chaim Mayer
FUNNIEST EVER WEDDING UNDER THE CHUPPAH- Ira & Diane
FUNNIEST EVER WEDDING UNDER THE CHUPPAH- Ira & Diane's Wedding.m2ts
Published: 2012/03/28
Channel: Ira Weisburd
XS SHOWBAND - Sheva Brachot during Chuppah ceremony
XS SHOWBAND - Sheva Brachot during Chuppah ceremony
Published: 2016/11/09
Channel: XS SHOWBAND
The Viznitzer Chuppah
The Viznitzer Chuppah
Published: 2009/11/19
Channel: Eventconcert
״נשבע״ chuppah song Hazzan Henry Hamra
״נשבע״ chuppah song Hazzan Henry Hamra
Published: 2016/07/06
Channel: Aleen Al
Chuppah.ca: Chuppah Rental, Setup and Custom Design Toronto
Chuppah.ca: Chuppah Rental, Setup and Custom Design Toronto
Published: 2015/04/22
Channel: Itay Avni
How To Setup A DIY Wedding Canopy or Chuppah
How To Setup A DIY Wedding Canopy or Chuppah
Published: 2015/12/01
Channel: Rent My Wedding
Bobov Chuppah at big wedding 2014
Bobov Chuppah at big wedding 2014
Published: 2014/01/15
Channel: Bobov Bobov
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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Orthodox Jewish wedding with chuppah in Vienna's first district, close to Judengasse, 2007.

A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה‎‎, pl. חוּפּוֹת, chuppot, literally, "canopy" or "covering"), also huppah, chipe, chupah, or chuppa, is a canopy under which a Jewish couple stand during their wedding ceremony. It consists of a cloth or sheet, sometimes a tallit, stretched or supported over four poles, or sometimes manually held up by attendants to the ceremony. A chuppah symbolizes the home that the couple will build together.

In a more general sense, chupah refers to the method by which nesuin, the second stage of a Jewish marriage, is accomplished. According to some opinions, it is accomplished by the couple standing under the canopy; however, there are other views.[1][2]

Customs[edit]

Chuppa at a synagogue in Toronto, Canada

A traditional chuppah, especially within Orthodox Judaism, recommends that there be open sky exactly above the chuppah,[3] although this is not mandatory among Sephardic communities. If the wedding ceremony is held indoors in a hall, sometimes a special opening is built to be opened during the ceremony. Many Hasidim prefer to conduct the entire ceremony outdoors. It is said that the couple's ancestors are present at the chuppah ceremony.[4]

In Yemen, the Jewish practice was not for the groom and his bride to be secluded in a canopy (chuppah) hung on four poles, as is widely practised today in Jewish weddings, but rather in a bridal chamber that was, in effect, a highly decorated room in the house of the groom. This room was traditionally decorated with large hanging sheets of colored, patterned cloth, replete with wall cushions and short-length mattresses for reclining.[5] Their marriage is consummated when they have been left together alone in this room. This ancient practice finds expression in the writings of Isaac ben Abba Mari (c. 1122 – c. 1193), author of Sefer ha-'Ittur,[6] concerning the Benediction of the Bridegroom: "Now the chuppah is when her father delivers her unto her husband, bringing her into that house wherein is some new innovation, such as the sheets… surrounding the walls, etc. For we recite in the Jerusalem Talmud, Sotah 46a (Sotah 9:15), 'Those bridal chambers, (chuppoth hathanim), they hang within them patterned sheets and gold-embroidered ribbons,' etc."

History and legal aspects[edit]

The word chuppah appears in the Hebrew Bible (e.g., Joel 2:16; Psalms 19:5). Abraham P. Bloch states that the connection between the term chuppah and the wedding ceremony 'can be traced to the Bible'; however, 'the physical appearance of the chuppah and its religious significance have undergone many changes since then.[7]

There were for centuries regional differences in what constituted a 'huppah'. Indeed, Solomon Freehof finds that the wedding canopy was unknown before the 16th century.[8] Alfred J. Kolatch notes that it was during the Middle Ages that the 'chupa ... in use today' became customary.[9] Daniel Sperber notes that for many communities prior to the 16th century, the huppah consisted of a veil worn by the bride.[10] In others, it was a cloth spread over the shoulders of the bride and groom.[10] Numerous illustrations of Jewish weddings in medieval Europe, North Africa and Italy show no evidence of a huppah as it is known today. Moses Isserles (1520–1572) notes that the portable marriage canopy was widely adopted by Ashkenazi Jews (as a symbol of the chamber within which marriages originally took place) in the generation before he composed his commentary to the Shulchan Aruch.[10]

In Biblical times, a couple consummated their marriage in a room or tent.[11] In Talmudic times, the room where the marriage was consummated was called the chuppah.[12] There is however a reference of a wedding canopy in the Babylonian Talmud, Gittin 57a: "It was the custom when a boy was born to plant a cedar tree and when a girl was born to plant a pine tree, and when they married, the tree was cut down and a canopy made of the branches".

Jewish weddings consist of two separate parts: the betrothal ceremony, known as erusin or kiddushin, and the actual wedding ceremony, known as nisuin. The first ceremony (the betrothal, which is today accomplished when the groom gives a wedding ring to the bride) prohibits the bride to all other men and cannot be dissolved without a religious divorce (get). The second ceremony permits the bride to her husband. Originally, the two ceremonies usually took place separately.[1] After the initial betrothal, the bride lived with her parents until the day the actual marriage ceremony arrived; the wedding ceremony would then take place in a room or tent that the groom had set up for her. After the ceremony the bride and groom would spend an hour together in an ordinary room, and then the bride would enter the chuppah and, after gaining her permission, the groom would join her.[12]

In the Middle Ages these two stages were increasingly combined into a single ceremony (which, from the 16th century, became the 'all but universal Jewish custom'[13]) and the chuppah lost its original meaning, with various other customs replacing it.[13] Indeed, in post-talmudic times the use of the chuppa chamber ceased;[12] the custom that became most common instead was to 'perform the whole combined ceremony under a canopy, to which the term chuppah was then applied, and to regard the bride's entry under the canopy as a symbol of the consummation of the marriage'.[14] The canopy 'created the semblance of a room'.[12]

There are legal varying opinions as to how the chuppah ceremony is to be performed today. Major opinions include standing under the canopy, and secluding the couple together in a room (yichud).[1] The bethothal and chuppah ceremonies are separated by the reading of the ketubah.[15]

This chuppah ceremony is connected to the seven blessings which are recited over a cup of wine at the conclusion of the ceremony (birchat nisuin or sheva brachot).

Symbolism[edit]

The chuppah represents a Jewish home symbolized by the cloth canopy and the four poles. Just as a chuppah is open on all four sides, so was the tent of Abraham open for hospitality. Thus, the chuppah represents hospitality to one's guests. This "home" initially lacks furniture as a reminder that the basis of a Jewish home is the people within it, not the possessions. In a spiritual sense, the covering of the chuppah represents the presence of God over the covenant of marriage. As the kippah served as a reminder of the Creator above all, (also a symbol of separation from God), so the chuppah was erected to signify that the ceremony and institution of marriage has divine origins.[citation needed]

In Ashkenazic communities, before going under the chuppah the groom covers the bride's face with a veil, known as the badeken (in Yiddish) or hinuma (in Hebrew). The origin of this tradition and its original purpose are in dispute. There are opinions that the chuppah means "covering the bride's face", hence covering the couple to be married. Others suggest that the purpose was for others to witness the act of covering, formalizing the family's home in a community, as it is a public part of the wedding. In Sephardic communities, this custom is not practiced. Instead, underneath the chuppah, the couple is wrapped together underneath a tallit.[clarification needed]

The groom enters the chuppah first to represent his ownership of the home on behalf of the couple. When the bride then enters the chuppah it is as though the groom is providing her with shelter or clothing, and he thus publicly demonstrates his new responsibilities toward her.[16]

Modern trends[edit]

A chuppah can be made of any material. A tallit or embroidered velvet cloth are commonly used. Silk or quilted chuppot are increasingly common, and can often be customized or personalized to suit the couple's unique interests and occupations.[17][18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kaplan, Rabbi Aryeh (1983). Made in Heaven, A Jewish Wedding Guide. New York / Jerusalem: Moznaim Publishers. , Chapter 18
  2. ^ Aside from Chuppah, it can also be accomplished by consummation; however, this is discouraged (Kaplan, Ibid.).
  3. ^ The Chupah -- Marriage Canopy on Chabad.org
  4. ^ Bar-Yochai, Rabi Shimon (2nd Century A.D.). Zohar (III). Israel. pp. Page 219B.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  5. ^ Yosef Qafih, Halikhot Teiman (Jewish Life in Sana) , Ben-Zvi Institute – Jerusalem 1982, pp. 143 and 148 (Hebrew); Yehuda Levi Nahum, Miṣefunot Yehudei Teman', Tel-Aviv 1962, p. 149 (Hebrew)
  6. ^ Isaac ben Abba Mari, Sefer ha'Ittur, Lwów, Ukraine 1860
  7. ^ Abraham P. Bloch, The Biblical and historical background of Jewish customs and ceremonies (KTAV Publishing House, Inc., 1980), p. 31-2
  8. ^ S. B. Freehof, 'Chuppah' in D. J. Silver, In the Time of Harvest (NY: Macmillan, 1963), p. 193
  9. ^ Alfred J. Kolatch, The Jewish Book of Why (Middle Village: Jonathan David Publishers, Inc., 2000), p. 35
  10. ^ a b c The Jewish Lifecycle, pp. 194–264
  11. ^ Ronald L. Eisenberg, Jewish Traditions: A JPS Guide (Philadelphia: JPS, 2004), p. 35; cf. Genesis 24:67
  12. ^ a b c d Abraham P. Bloch, The Biblical and historical background of Jewish customs and ceremonies (KTAV Publishing House, Inc., 1980), p. 32
  13. ^ a b Rabbi John Rayner, Guide to Jewish Marriage (London: 1975), p. 19
  14. ^ Rabbi John Rayner, Guide to Jewish Marriage (London: 1975), p. 19–20
  15. ^ Kaplan, Rabbi Aryeh (1983). Made in Heaven, A Jewish Wedding Guide. New York / Jerusalem: Moznaim Publishers. , Chapter 21
  16. ^ Levush, 54:1; Aruch HaShulchan, 55:18.
  17. ^ My Very Own Chuppah http://www.jewishjournal.com/home/preview.php?id=8108
  18. ^ Jeanette Kuvin Oren http://www.kuvinoren.com/#!huppah/cfau

Further reading[edit]

  • Abraham P. Bloch, The Biblical and historical background of Jewish customs and ceremonies (KTAV Publishing House, Inc., 1980 ISBN 978-0-87068-658-0)
  • Isaac Klein, A guide to Jewish religious practice (KTAV Publishing House, Inc., 1979 ISBN 978-0-87334-004-5)
  • Rabbi John Rayner, Guide to Jewish Marriage (London: 1975)

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