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A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Introduction
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Introduction
Published: 2015/02/25
Channel: Martin Hilpert
2 MINUTE Language Theories: Cognitive linguistics
2 MINUTE Language Theories: Cognitive linguistics
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Channel: Teach them English
George Lakoff on Embodied Cognition and Language
George Lakoff on Embodied Cognition and Language
Published: 2013/10/22
Channel: Central European University
Cognitive Linguistics
Cognitive Linguistics
Published: 2016/03/08
Channel: Jake Goldwasser
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Cognitive Grammar
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Cognitive Grammar
Published: 2015/07/26
Channel: Martin Hilpert
What is COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS? What does COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS mean?
What is COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS? What does COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS mean?
Published: 2016/06/27
Channel: The Audiopedia
Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain
Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain
Published: 2012/10/06
Channel: Big Think
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Color
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Color
Published: 2015/07/28
Channel: Martin Hilpert
The 13th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference at Northumbria
The 13th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference at Northumbria
Published: 2015/07/23
Channel: Northumbria University
Adele Goldberg on Linguistics and Grammar
Adele Goldberg on Linguistics and Grammar
Published: 2014/12/19
Channel: Grammar Revolution Movie
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Frame Semantics
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Frame Semantics
Published: 2015/07/24
Channel: Martin Hilpert
Cognitive Linguistics - Categorization and ICMs
Cognitive Linguistics - Categorization and ICMs
Published: 2015/11/04
Channel: tesolnet
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Categorization
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Categorization
Published: 2015/02/27
Channel: Martin Hilpert
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Metaphor
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Metaphor
Published: 2015/02/26
Channel: Martin Hilpert
Noam Chomsky: Language and Other Cognitive Processes
Noam Chomsky: Language and Other Cognitive Processes
Published: 2012/11/27
Channel: WGBHForum
Idea Framing, Metaphors, and Your Brain - George Lakoff
Idea Framing, Metaphors, and Your Brain - George Lakoff
Published: 2008/07/16
Channel: FORA.tv
Linguist Steven Pinker Explains the ‘Cognitive Niche’
Linguist Steven Pinker Explains the ‘Cognitive Niche’
Published: 2015/08/19
Channel: World Science Festival
Cognitive linguistics
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Channel: WikiWikiup
Chris Prather - I Never Metaphor I Didn
Chris Prather - I Never Metaphor I Didn't Like: How Cognitive Linguistics Helps You Be A Badass Dev
Published: 2017/01/26
Channel: southeastlinuxfest
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Usage-based linguistics
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Usage-based linguistics
Published: 2015/05/08
Channel: Martin Hilpert
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Conceptual integration
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Conceptual integration
Published: 2015/04/01
Channel: Martin Hilpert
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Polysemy
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: Polysemy
Published: 2015/03/11
Channel: Martin Hilpert
Dr. Frank Boers - Applications of Cognitive Linguistics to L2 Pedagogy - KOTESOL IC 2012
Dr. Frank Boers - Applications of Cognitive Linguistics to L2 Pedagogy - KOTESOL IC 2012
Published: 2013/02/17
Channel: KoreaTESOL
Cognitive linguistics
Cognitive linguistics
Published: 2015/11/27
Channel: Audiopedia
Theories of language and cognition | Processing the Environment | MCAT | Khan Academy
Theories of language and cognition | Processing the Environment | MCAT | Khan Academy
Published: 2013/09/17
Channel: khanacademymedicine
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: More about metaphor
A course in Cognitive Linguistics: More about metaphor
Published: 2015/03/12
Channel: Martin Hilpert
COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Published: 2016/08/06
Channel: DERYA AGIS
E.Belyaevskaya: Cognitive Linguistics in Second Language Acquisition
E.Belyaevskaya: Cognitive Linguistics in Second Language Acquisition
Published: 2014/02/06
Channel: mgimo
What Is The Cognitive Linguistics?
What Is The Cognitive Linguistics?
Published: 2017/09/27
Channel: Another Question II
1st Language Creation Conference - 4 - John Quijada - Cognitive linguistics
1st Language Creation Conference - 4 - John Quijada - Cognitive linguistics
Published: 2011/04/19
Channel: Language Creation Society
Cognitive Linguistics and the Second Language Classroom
Cognitive Linguistics and the Second Language Classroom
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Channel: TESOLacademic
Cognitive Linguistics in Action From Theory to Application
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cognitive linguistics vs. predicate logic
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Channel: ThePublicMindDenver
Applications of Cognitive Linguistics
Applications of Cognitive Linguistics
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Cognitive Sociolinguistics and Modularity (a lecture by prof. Dirk Geeraerts)
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Channel: Школа лингвистики НИУ ВШЭ
Laura A. Janda: The use of statistics in cognitive linguistics
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Channel: The Audiopedia
What is CONSTRUCTION GRAMMAR? What does CONSTRUCTION GRAMMAR mean? CONSTRUCTION GRAMMAR meaning
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Noam Chomsky on Linguistics - Poverty of Stimulus
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Phonology A cognitive grammar introduction Cognitive Linguistics in Practice
Phonology A cognitive grammar introduction Cognitive Linguistics in Practice
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Channel: Jean Peeler
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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Cognitive linguistics (CL) is the branch of linguistics that focuses on language as an instrument for organizing, processing and conveying information.

Within CL, the analysis of the conceptual and experiential basis of linguistic categories is of primary importance. The formal structures of language are studied not as if they were autonomous, but as reflections of general conceptual organization, categorization principles, processing mechanisms, and experiential and environmental influences. Since cognitive linguistics sees language as embedded in the overall cognitive capacities of human beings, topics of special interest for cognitive linguistics include: the structural characteristics of natural language categorization (such as prototypicality, systematic polysemy, cognitive models, mental imagery, and conceptual metaphor); the functional principles of linguistic organization (such as iconicity and naturalness); the conceptual interface between syntax and semantics (as explored by cognitive grammar and construction grammar); the experiential and pragmatic background of language-in-use; and the relationship between language and thought, including questions about linguistic relativity and conceptual universals. To summarize, what holds together the diverse forms of cognitive linguistics is the belief that linguistic knowledge involves not just knowledge of the language, but knowledge of the world as mediated by the language.[1]

In addition, cognitive linguistics argues that language is both embodied and situated in a specific environment.

Three central positions[edit]

Cognitive linguists deny that the mind has any module for language-acquisition that is unique and autonomous. This stands in contrast to the stance adopted by Noam Chomsky and others in the field of generative grammar. Although cognitive linguists do not necessarily deny that part of the human linguistic ability is innate, they deny that it is separate from the rest of cognition. They thus reject a body of opinion in cognitive science suggesting that there is evidence for the modularity of language. Departing from the tradition of truth-conditional semantics, cognitive linguists view meaning in terms of conceptualization. Instead of viewing meaning in terms of models of the world, they view it in terms of mental spaces.

They argue that knowledge of linguistic phenomena — i.e., phonemes, morphemes, and syntax — is essentially conceptual in nature. However, they assert that the storage and retrieval of linguistic data is not significantly different from the storage and retrieval of other knowledge, and that use of language in understanding employs similar cognitive abilities to those used in other non-linguistic tasks.

Embodied and situated[edit]

Areas of study[edit]

Cognitive linguistics is divided into three main areas of study:

Aspects of cognition that are of interest to cognitive linguists include:

Related work that interfaces with many of the above themes:

  • Computational models of metaphor and language acquisition.
  • Dynamical models of language acquisition
  • Conceptual semantics, pursued by generative linguist Ray Jackendoff, is related because of its active psychological realism and the incorporation of prototype structure and images.

Cognitive linguistics, more than generative linguistics, seeks to mesh together these findings into a coherent whole. A further complication arises because the terminology of cognitive linguistics is not entirely stable, both because it is a relatively new field and because it interfaces with a number of other disciplines.

Insights and developments from cognitive linguistics are becoming accepted ways of analysing literary texts, too. Cognitive Poetics, as it has become known, has become an important part of modern stylistics.

Controversy[edit]

There is significant peer review and debate within the field of linguistics regarding cognitive linguistics. Critics of cognitive linguistics have argued that most of the evidence from the cognitive view comes from the research in pragmatics and semantics, and research in metaphor and preposition choice. They suggest that cognitive linguists should provide cognitive re-analyses of topics in syntax and phonology that are understood in terms of autonomous knowledge (Gibbs 1996).

There is also controversy and debate within the field concerning the representation and status of idioms in grammar and the actual mental grammar of speakers. On one hand it is asserted that idiom variation needs to be explained with regard to general and autonomous syntactic rules. Another view says such idioms do not constitute semantic units and can be processed compositionally (Langlotz 2006).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics. 

General references[edit]

  • Evans, Vyvyan & Melanie Green (2006). Cognitive Linguistics: An Introduction. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • Evans, Vyvyan (2007). A Glossary of Cognitive Linguistics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • Gibbs (1996) in Casad ED. Cognitive Linguistics in the Redwoods: The Expansion of a New Paradigm in Linguistics (Cognitive Linguistic Research) Mouton De Gruyter (June 1996) ISBN 9783110143584.
  • Langlotz, Andreas. 2006. Idiomatic Creativity: A Cognitive-linguistic Model of Idiom-representation And Idiom Variation in English. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Further reading[edit]

  • Charteris-Black, J. (2004). Corpus Approaches to Critical Metaphor Analysis. Palgrave-MacMillan. ISBN 1403932921
  • Croft, W. & D. A. Cruse (2004) Cognitive Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Evans, Vyvyan & Melanie Green (2006). Cognitive Linguistics: An Introduction. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • Evans, Vyvyan (2007). A Glossary of Cognitive Linguistics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • Evans, Vyvyan, Benjamin K. Bergen and Jörg Zinken (Eds.) (2007). The Cognitive Linguistics Reader. London: Equinox Publishing Co.
  • Evans, Vyvyan, Benjamin Bergen and Jörg Zinken (2007). "The Cognitive Linguistics Enterprise: An Overview". In Vyvyan Evans, Benjamin Bergen and Jörg Zinken (Eds.). The Cognitive Linguistics Reader [listed above].
  • Fauconnier, G. (1997). Mappings in Thought and Language.
  • Fauconnier, Gilles has written a brief, manifesto-like introduction to Cognitive linguistics, which compares it to mainstream, Chomsky-inspired linguistics. See "Introduction to Methods and Generalizations" in T. Janssen and G. Redeker (Eds) (1999). Scope and Foundations of Cognitive Linguistics. The Hague: Mouton De Gruyter. Cognitive Linguistics Research Series. (on-line version)
  • Fauconnier, Gilles and Mark Turner (2003). The Way We Think. New York: Basic Books.
  • Geeraerts, D. & H. Cuyckens, eds. (2007). The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978 0 19 514378 2.
  • Geeraerts, D., ed. (2006). Cognitive Linguistics: Basic Readings. Berlin / New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Gibbs Jr., Raymond W. and Herbert L. Colston (1995). "The cognitive psychological reality of image schemas and their transformations". Cognitive Linguistics (includes Cognitive Linguistic Bibliography). Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 347–378, ISSN (Online) 1613-3641, ISSN (Print) 0936-5907.
  • Goossens, Louis (Oct. 2009). Metaphtonymy: the interaction of metaphor and metonymy in expressions for linguistic action. Cognitive Linguistics (includes Cognitive Linguistic Bibliography). Volume 1, Issue 3, Pages 323–342, ISSN (Online) 1613-3641, ISSN (Print) 0936-5907, DOI: 10.1515/cogl.1990.1.3.323
  • Grady, Oakley, and Coulson (1999). "Blending and Metaphor". In Metaphor in Cognitive Linguistics, Steen and Gibbs (eds.). Philadelphia: John Benjamins. (online version)
  • Jackendoff, Ray (1996). "Conceptual semantics and Cognitive linguistics". In Cognitive Linguistics 7-1, pp. 93-129. Online Version.
  • Kristiansen et al., eds. (2006). Cognitive Linguistics: Current Applications and Future Perspectives. Berlin / New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Lakoff, George (1987). Women, Fire, and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal About the Mind. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0 226 46804 6.
  • Lakoff, George and Mark Johnson. (1980). Metaphors We Live By. University of Chicago Press.
  • Lee, D.A. (2001). Cognitive Linguistics: An Introduction (1st ed.). Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
  • Rohrer, T. (2007). "Embodiment and Experientialism". In The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics [listed above].
  • Schmid, H. J. et al. (1996). An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics. New York, Longman.
  • Silverman, Daniel (2011). "Usage-based Phonology", in Bert Botma, Nancy C. Kula, and Kuniya Nasukawa, eds., Continuum Companion to Phonology. Continuum.
  • Taylor, J. R. (2002). Cognitive Grammar. Oxford, Oxford University Press.
  • Tomasello, M. (2003). Constructing a Language: A Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquisition. Harvard University Press.
  • Wolf, et al. (2006), The Cognitive Linguistics Bibliography, Mouton De Gruyter, Berlin.

External links[edit]

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