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Relults of the German Federal Elections - AfD third strongest party!
Relults of the German Federal Elections - AfD third strongest party!
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Red Pill Germany
German Election Results Explained 2017
German Election Results Explained 2017
Published: 2017/09/24
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German federal elections upcoming this Sunday (special coverage)
German federal elections upcoming this Sunday (special coverage)
Published: 2017/09/23
Channel: RT
The Nigel Farage Show On Sunday: The German Elections 2/2 LBC - 24th September 2017
The Nigel Farage Show On Sunday: The German Elections 2/2 LBC - 24th September 2017
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: OrionPrime
RT
RT's special coverage: Final countdown to German federal elections (Streamed live)
Published: 2017/09/23
Channel: RT
Exit Poll in German Federal Election Forecast Merkel
Exit Poll in German Federal Election Forecast Merkel's CDU to be largest party with 32,5%. #Germany
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Almutaz Bur News Network
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from CDU
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from CDU
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Ruptly TV
German Elections 2017 | Easy German 213
German Elections 2017 | Easy German 213
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Easy German
Is Merkel becoming too powerful? I German Election I Brexit I Nigel Farage
Is Merkel becoming too powerful? I German Election I Brexit I Nigel Farage
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Politics UK
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: official results announcement
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: official results announcement
Published: 2017/09/25
Channel: Ruptly TV
Angela Merkel wins German elections as AfD enters Bundestag
Angela Merkel wins German elections as AfD enters Bundestag
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Nina Schick
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from FDP
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from FDP
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Ruptly TV
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from AFD
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from AFD
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Ruptly TV
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: Merkel casts her vote
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: Merkel casts her vote
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Ruptly TV
The German Election Explained
The German Election Explained
Published: 2017/09/18
Channel: Wall Street Journal
POLITICS IN GERMANY - My View of the German Federal Election
POLITICS IN GERMANY - My View of the German Federal Election
Published: 2017/09/13
Channel: Wanted Adventure
Far-right party gains footing in German election
Far-right party gains footing in German election
Published: 2017/09/23
Channel: PBS NewsHour
‘Germans fear big challenges, they’ll support Merkel at 2017 elections’ – geopolitics expert
‘Germans fear big challenges, they’ll support Merkel at 2017 elections’ – geopolitics expert
Published: 2017/08/15
Channel: RT
Germany: Official results of German Federal Election 2017 announced
Germany: Official results of German Federal Election 2017 announced
Published: 2017/09/25
Channel: Ruptly TV
Historic vote: Right-wing AfD party enters German parliament
Historic vote: Right-wing AfD party enters German parliament
Published: 2017/09/25
Channel: RT
Polls open in Germany
Polls open in Germany
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: euronews (in English)
German elections results chat
German elections results chat
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Kristi Winters
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from SPD
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: exit polls reaction from SPD
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Ruptly TV
German Election: Can AfD Win?
German Election: Can AfD Win?
Published: 2017/09/23
Channel: Red Ice TV
German elections: Can the AfD win this year?
German elections: Can the AfD win this year?
Published: 2017/02/12
Channel: rewboss
Who YOU Should VOTE For | GERMAN FEDERAL ELECTIONS 2017 | Get Germanized
Who YOU Should VOTE For | GERMAN FEDERAL ELECTIONS 2017 | Get Germanized
Published: 2017/09/10
Channel: Get Germanized
German election system / Bundestagswahl easily explained (explainity® explainer video)
German election system / Bundestagswahl easily explained (explainity® explainer video)
Published: 2017/01/19
Channel: explainitychannel
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: Schulz casts his vote
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: Schulz casts his vote
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Ruptly TV
German Chancellor Merkel on Winning the Election
German Chancellor Merkel on Winning the Election
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Bloomberg TV Markets and Finance
'Where are the Russians?': No sign of Russian meddling reported during ongoing German elections
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: RT
German Federal Election Results (1949-2013)
German Federal Election Results (1949-2013)
Published: 2017/06/15
Channel: jase333
Germany: CDU HQ reacts to first exit poll as AfD looks to have secured third place
Germany: CDU HQ reacts to first exit poll as AfD looks to have secured third place
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Ruptly TV
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: opening of polls
LIVE: German Federal Election 2017: opening of polls
Published: 2017/09/24
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Bashar Assad won the German elections
Bashar Assad won the German elections
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German Elections - Predictions
German Elections - Predictions
Published: 2017/09/20
Channel: Dr. Layman
German election campaigning ends ahead of vote
German election campaigning ends ahead of vote
Published: 2017/09/23
Channel: Al Jazeera English
UPDATE: German polls 2017
UPDATE: German polls 2017
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: SABC Digital News
Germany
Germany's election: What you need to know - BBC News
Published: 2017/09/03
Channel: BBC News
German Election 2017: All You Need To Know About The Vote | CNBC
German Election 2017: All You Need To Know About The Vote | CNBC
Published: 2017/09/22
Channel: CNBC
What to Expect From the German Elections
What to Expect From the German Elections
Published: 2017/09/22
Channel: Bloomberg Politics
A Look at German Election Scenarios
A Look at German Election Scenarios
Published: 2017/08/14
Channel: Bloomberg Politics
Does Merkel face fight in German elections?
Does Merkel face fight in German elections?
Published: 2017/09/04
Channel: Nina Schick
German election: Angela Merkel favourite to win fourth term
German election: Angela Merkel favourite to win fourth term
Published: 2017/09/17
Channel: Al Jazeera English
Unpacking the German election campaign: Tanit Koch and Stefan Kornelius – BBC Newsnight
Unpacking the German election campaign: Tanit Koch and Stefan Kornelius – BBC Newsnight
Published: 2017/09/23
Channel: BBC Newsnight
German Elections: Merkel Wins Fourth Term As Far-Right Enters Parliament | NBC Nightly News
German Elections: Merkel Wins Fourth Term As Far-Right Enters Parliament | NBC Nightly News
Published: 2017/09/25
Channel: NBC News
German Elections Results 2017,Angela Merkel Wins Fourth Term As Chancellor - Merkel Victory Speech
German Elections Results 2017,Angela Merkel Wins Fourth Term As Chancellor - Merkel Victory Speech
Published: 2017/09/24
Channel: Everything News
German 2017 Elections: Angela Merkel vs Martin Schulz - Saving the European Union
German 2017 Elections: Angela Merkel vs Martin Schulz - Saving the European Union
Published: 2017/02/05
Channel: Serious Gaming
Is Germany becoming more right-wing? - BBC Newsnight
Is Germany becoming more right-wing? - BBC Newsnight
Published: 2017/08/18
Channel: BBC Newsnight
German election 2017: Martin Schulz unable to make headway against Angela Merkel
German election 2017: Martin Schulz unable to make headway against Angela Merkel
Published: 2017/09/20
Channel: Al Jazeera English
Merkel
Merkel's party wins key German state election
Published: 2017/05/15
Channel: Al Jazeera English
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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German federal election, 2017
Germany
← 2013 24 September 2017

All 598 seats in the Bundestag, as well as 111 overhang seats
355 seats needed for a majority
Registered 61,500,000
Turnout 75.9
Increase4.4 pp
  First party Second party Third party
  Angela Merkel June 2017.jpg 2017-07-21 Martin Schulz 0789.JPG 2017.07.22.200910 Alice Weidel AfD-Informationsveranstaltung Schriesheim (cropped).jpg
Leader Angela Merkel Martin Schulz Alice Weidel &
Alexander Gauland
Party CDU/CSU SPD AfD
Leader since 10 April 2000 19 March 2017
Leader's seat Vorpommern-Rügen-Greifswald North Rhine-Westphalia
Last election 311 seats, 41.5% 193 seats, 25.7% 0 seats, 4.7%
Seats won 246 153 94
Seat change Decrease65 Decrease40 Increase94
Popular vote
Percentage 33.2% 20.4% 13.0%
Swing Decrease7.4 % Decrease5.2 % Increase8.2%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  ChristianLindner-FDP-1 (cropped 1).jpg 2014-09-11 - Sahra Wagenknecht MdB - 8301.jpg Katrin Göring-Eckardt (cropped).jpg
Leader Christian Lindner Sahra Wagenknecht
& Dietmar Bartsch
Katrin Göring-Eckardt
& Cem Özdemir
Party FDP Left Green
Leader since 7 December 2013 – (Göring-Eckardt)
15 November 2008 (Özdemir)
Leader's seat North Rhine-Westphalia &
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Thuringia &
Baden-Württemberg
Last election 0 seats, 4.8% 64 seats, 8.6% 63 seats, 8.4%
Seats won 80 69 67
Seat change Increase80 Increase5 Increase4
Percentage 10.7% 9.1% 9.0%
Swing Increase5.9% Increase0.6% Increase0.5%

Chancellor before election

Angela Merkel
CDU/CSU

Elected Chancellor

TBD

Coat of arms of Germany.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Germany
Foreign relations

Federal elections were held in Germany on Sunday, 24 September, to elect the members of the 19th Bundestag. The new Bundestag will have to elect a Chancellor with an absolute majority of its members, who will in turn form a new government.

The Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union (CDU/CSU), led by Angela Merkel, had maintained a double-digit lead over the Social Democratic Party (SPD) in opinion polling since the 2013 election, aside from a period in early 2017 following the selection of Martin Schulz as SPD leader.

The first exit poll after the polls closed at 6 p.m. showed the Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union (CDU/CSU) to have 33% of the vote, the Social Democratic Party (SPD) to have achieved its worst result ever with just 20% of the vote, and Alternative for Germany (AfD)—who were previously unrepresented in the Bundestag—have taken 13% of the vote.[1]

Background[edit]

At the previous federal election, in 2013, the incumbent government—composed of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), the Christian Social Union (CSU), and the Free Democratic Party (FDP)—failed to achieve a majority of seats. The FDP failed to get over 5% of the vote, denying the party seats in the Bundestag for the first time in its history. In contrast, the CDU/CSU obtained their best result since 1990, with nearly 42% of the vote and just short of 50% of the seats. The CDU/CSU successfully negotiated with the Social Democrats (SPD) to form a grand coalition for the third time.[2]

In March 2017, the SPD chose Martin Schulz, the former President of the European Parliament, as their leader and chancellor candidate. Support for the SPD initially increased; however, the CDU afterward regained its lead, with polls generally showing a 13–16% lead over the SPD. In May, the SPD lost control of the major state of North Rhine-Westphalia in a state election.

Date[edit]

German law requires that a new Bundestag shall be elected on a Sunday or on a nationwide holiday between 46–48 months after the last Bundestag's first sitting (Basic Law Article 39 Section 1).[3] In January 2017, then President Joachim Gauck scheduled the election for 24 September 2017.[4]

After the election, the 19th Bundestag has to hold its first sitting within 30 days. Until that first sitting, the members of the 18th Bundestag will stay in office (Basic Law Article 39 Section 1 and 2).[3]

Electoral system[edit]

Germany uses the mixed-member proportional representation system, a system of proportional representation combined with elements of first-past-the-post voting. The Bundestag has 598 nominal members, elected for a four-year term; these seats are distributed between the sixteen German states in proportion to the states' population eligible to vote.

Every elector has two votes; a constituency and a list vote. 299 members are elected in single-member constituencies by first-past-the-post based just on the first votes. The second votes are used to produce an overall proportional result in the states and then in the Bundestag. Seats are allocated using the Sainte-Laguë method. If a party wins fewer constituency seats in a state than it would be entitled to, it receives additional seats from the relevant state list. Parties can file lists in each single state under certain conditions, for example a fixed number of supporting signatures. Parties can receive second votes only in those states in which they have successfully filed a state-list.

If a party by winning single-member constituencies in one state earns more seats than it would be entitled to according to its second vote share in that state (so called overhang seats), the other parties receive compensation seats. Because of that, the Bundestag usually has more than 598 members. The 18th and current Bundestag, for example, started with 631 seats: 598 regular and 33 overhang and compensation seats.

In order to qualify for seats based on the party-list vote share, a party must either win three single-member constituencies or exceed a threshold of 5% of the second votes nationwide. If a party only wins one or two single-member constituencies and fails to get at least 5% of the second votes, it keeps the single-member seat(s), but the other parties, who accomplish one of the two threshold conditions, receive compensation seats (in the most recent example of below-threshold party results, during the 2002 election, the PDS won only 4.0% of the party-list votes nationwide, but won two constituencies in the state of Berlin). The same applies if an independent candidate wins a single-member constituency (which has not happened since 1949). In 2013 election, the FDP only won 4.8% of party-list votes, cost them lost all of the seats in the Bundestag.

If a voter has cast a first vote for a successful independent candidate or a successful candidate whose party failed to qualify for proportional representation, their second vote does not count to determine proportional representation. However it does count to determine whether the elected party has exceeded the 5% threshold.

Parties representing recognized national minorities (currently Danes, Frisians, Sorbs and Romani people) are exempt from the 5% threshold, but normally only run in state elections.[5]

Parties and leaders[edit]

Altogether 38 parties have managed to get on the ballot in at least one state and can therefore (theoretically) earn proportional representation in the Bundestag.[6] Furthermore there are several independent candidates, running for a single-member constituency. The major parties that are likely to either exceed the threshold of 5% second votes or to win single-member constituencies (first votes) are:

Party Ideology Political position Leading candidate(s)
Christian Democratic Union (CDU) Christian democracy, liberal conservatism Centre-right Angela Merkel (sitting Chancellor and Chancellor candidate)
Social Democratic Party (SPD) Social democracy Centre-left Martin Schulz (Chancellor candidate)
The Left Democratic socialism, left-wing populism Left-wing to far-left Dietmar Bartsch, Sahra Wagenknecht
Alliance 90/The Greens Green politics Centre-left Cem Özdemir, Katrin Göring-Eckardt
Christian Social Union (CSU) Bavarian regionalism, Christian democracy, conservatism Centre-right Joachim Herrmann, but endorsed Angela Merkel as Chancellor candidate of their party-alliance with the CDU
Free Democratic Party (FDP) Liberalism, classical liberalism Centre to centre-right Christian Lindner
Alternative for Germany (AfD) National conservatism,[7] Euroscepticism Right-wing to far-right Alexander Gauland, Alice Weidel

By tradition, the Christian Democratic Union of Germany (CDU) and Christian Social Union in Bavaria (CSU), which refer to each other as sister parties, do not compete against each other. The CSU has only filed a list in Bavaria, while the CDU has filed lists in the other fifteen states. This allows them to join in one parliamentary group after the election as the CDU/CSU, which they have always done in the past and which they are expected to do again after this election.

As the CDU/CSU and the Social Democratic Party (SPD) are likely to win the most seats in the election, their leading candidates are referred to as Chancellor candidates. This does however not mean that the new Bundestag is legally bound to elect one of them as Chancellor.

Opinion polling[edit]

The polls are from September 2013 (the last federal election) up to the current date. Each coloured line specifies a political party.

Exit polls suggest that the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and the Christian Social Union of Bavaria (CSU) will remain the largest bloc despite losing 8.5% percentage points from their last result. Their grand coalition partner and principal opponent to lead the government the Social Democratic Party (SPD) also fell in the popular vote, by about 5 percentage points. The right-wing, eurosceptic Alternative for Germany is set to enter the Bundestag for the first time as the third largest party, while the Free Democratic Party (FDP) is set to re-enter the Bundestag with 10% of the popular vote after being shut out in 2013. The Greens and the Left are set to remain in the Bundestag with about the same vote share as the previous election.[8][9]

Results[edit]

Composition of German Bundestag based on election results
  The Left: 69 seats
  SPD: 153 seats
  The Greens: 67 seats
  FDP: 80 seats
  CDU: 200 seats
  CSU: 46 seats
  AfD: 94 seats

The CDU/CSU and the SPD remained the two largest parties in the Bundestag, but both received a significantly lower proportion of the vote than they did in the 2013 election. Both the FDP and the AfD received enough votes to become parties in the Bundestag. This was the first federal election in which the right-wing AfD received enough votes to be represented in the Bundestag.

Party Constituency Party list Total
seats
+/–
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Christian Democratic Union (CDU)[a] 14,027,804 30.2 186 12,445,832 26.8 7 193 -73
Social Democratic Party (SPD) 11,426,613 24.6 59 9,538,367 20.5 89 148 -45
Alternative for Germany (AfD) 5,316,095 11.5 3 5,877,094 13.0 92 95 +95
Free Democratic Party (FDP) 3,248,745 7.0 0 4,997,178 10.7 78 78 +78
The Left (DIE LINKE) 3,966,035 8.6 5 4,296,762 9.2 61 66 +2
Alliance 90/The Greens (GRÜNE) 3,717,436 8.0 1 4,157,564 8.9 64 65 +2
Christian Social Union in Bavaria (CSU)[a] 3,255,604 7.0 45 2,869,744 6.2 0 45 -11
Free Voters 589,116 1.3 463,052 1.0
Ecological Democratic Party 166,132 0.4 144,772 0.3
Die PARTEI 245,415 0.5 452,922 1.0
Bavaria Party 62,556 0.1 57,952 0.1
Pirate Party Germany 93,173 0.2 173,867 0.4
National Democratic Party 45,239 0.1 176,715 0.4
Marxist–Leninist Party 12,030 0.1 10,140 0.0
Human Environment Animal Protection 11,446 0.1 154,783 0.7
Bürgerrechtsbewegung Solidarität 15,993 0.0 6,735 0.0
Animal Protection Alliance 2,008 0.0 7,855 0.0
German Communist Party 1,817 0.0 3,314 0.0
The Violets – for Spiritual Politics 1,235 0.0
Alliance C 992 0.0
New Liberals 538 0.0
The Right 397 0.0 1,127 0.0
Die Einheit 373 0.0
V-Party 1,204 0.0 30,557 0.1
Gesundheitsforschung 1,524 0.0 12,662 0.1
Alliance for Germany 5,144 0.0
Human World 4,270 0.0
Socialist Equality Party 387 0.0
B* 672 0.0 932 0.0
The Greys 4,311 0.0 9,874 0.0
du. 767 0.0 3,018 0.0
MG 2,568 0.0 5,606 0.0
Family Party 505 0.0
The Women 431 0.0
Renter's Party 1,322 0.0
BGE 97,386 0.2
DM 63,133 0.1
DiB 60,826 0.1
AD-DEMOKRATEN 41,178 0.1
The Humanists 5,989 0.0
Others 100,657 0.2
Independents 2,455 0.0
Invalid/blank votes 593,161 1.3 466,942 1.0
Total 46,973,799 100 299 100 391 709
Registered voters/turnout 61,675,529 76.2
Source: Bundeswahleiter (299 of 299 constituencies reporting)
Popular Vote
CDU/CSU
  
33.0%
SPD
  
20.6%
AfD
  
13.0%
FDP
  
10.6%
DIE LINKE
  
9.1%
B'90/GRÜNE
  
8.9%
Others
  
5.0%
Bundestag Seats
CDU/CSU
  
34.6%
SPD
  
21.7%
AfD
  
13.5%
FDP
  
11.2%
DIE LINKE
  
9.6%
B'90/GRÜNE
  
9.4%

Most overhang seats[edit]

Because of the strong performance of the CDU and CSU in former West German constituencies, they have an unprecedented number of overhang seats, and in turn an unprecedented number of leveling seats will be allocated to other parties to create a proportional Bundestag. An anticipated 690 members, up from 631 members from 2013–2017, are expected to be seated. A "normal" Bundestag, without compensation for overhang seats, has 598 members.[10]

Government formation[edit]

The SPD's deputy leader Manuela Schwesig and the SPD's parliamentary chairman Thomas Oppermann have said that SPD will leave the current grand coalition government,[11] after dissatisfied election results.

The media speculated that Chancellor Angela Merkel may need to form a Jamaica coalition (black-yellow-green) with the Free Democrats and the Greens, if the Social Democrats leave the government.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Christian Democratic Union and the Christian Social Union of Bavaria call themselves sister parties. They do not compete against each other in the same geographical regions and they form one group within the Bundestag.
  1. ^ "Germany heads to the polls". DW. Retrieved 24 September 2017. 
  2. ^ "Bundesregierung: Die Große Koalition ist besiegelt" [The grand coalition (deal) is sealed]. Die Zeit (in German). 16 December 2013. ISSN 0044-2070. Retrieved 20 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "Art 39 GG – Einzelnorm". Gesetze-im-internet.de. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  4. ^ "Bundespräsident Gauck fertigt Anordnung über Bundestagswahl aus". Bundespraesident.de. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  5. ^ "Wahlsystem der Bundestagswahl in Deutschland – Wahlrecht und Besonderheiten". Wahlrecht.de (de). Retrieved 26 August 2017. 
  6. ^ "Bundestagswahl 2017 – Übersicht: Eingereichte und zugelassene Landeslisten der Parteien". Wahlrecht.de. Retrieved 26 August 2017. 
  7. ^ Nordsieck, Wolfram. "Parties and Elections in Europe". www.parties-and-elections.eu. Retrieved 2017-09-24. 
  8. ^ "Merkel wins fourth term in Germany". BBC News. 2017-09-24. Retrieved 2017-09-24. 
  9. ^ tagesschau. "Hochrechnung zur #btw17 von 19:22 Uhr.pic.twitter.com/1aWWuZWSN0". @tagesschau (in German). Retrieved 2017-09-24.  10:26 AM - 24 Sep 2017.
  10. ^ Rundfunk, Jürgen P. Lang, Bayerischer (20 September 2017). "Überhangmandate nehmen überhand: 690 Abgeordnete im neuen Bundestag - BR.de". 
  11. ^ Donahue, Patrick; Jennen, Birgit; Delfs, Arne (24 September 2017). "Merkel Humbled as Far-Right Surge Taints Her Fourth-Term Victory". Bloomberg News. Retrieved September 24, 2017. 
  12. ^ "Germany election: Merkel wins fourth term, exit polls say". BBC News. London. September 24, 2017. Retrieved September 24, 2017. 
  13. ^ "Germany’s exit polls point to big losses for the two main parties". The Economist. Berlin. September 24, 2017. Retrieved September 24, 2017. 

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