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Highlander Research & Education Center - Folk Alliance International Lifetime Achievement Award 2012
Highlander Research & Education Center - Folk Alliance International Lifetime Achievement Award 2012
Published: 2012/03/28
Channel: FolkAlliance
BIN Stories: Joe Tolbert - Highlander Research and Education Center
BIN Stories: Joe Tolbert - Highlander Research and Education Center
Published: 2014/07/28
Channel: BAJIPage
Pete Seeger on Highlander
Pete Seeger on Highlander's 75th Anniversary
Published: 2007/10/28
Channel: highlandercenter
Highlander Research and Education Center
Highlander Research and Education Center
Published: 2010/08/08
Channel: misakimaui
"We Shall Overcome" from FD-754, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
"We Shall Overcome" from FD-754, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
Published: 2017/06/27
Channel: sfolklife
"No More Mourning" from FD-730, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
"No More Mourning" from FD-730, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
Published: 2017/06/27
Channel: sfolklife
18 Neal: Highlander Folk School
18 Neal: Highlander Folk School
Published: 2015/09/14
Channel: nunncenter
Highlander Research & Education Center
Highlander Research & Education Center's Zilphia Horton Project
Published: 2011/02/21
Channel: Pardo75
"No More Mourning" from FD-764, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
"No More Mourning" from FD-764, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
Published: 2017/06/27
Channel: sfolklife
The Highlander Folk School
The Highlander Folk School
Published: 2016/06/10
Channel: Studies Weekly
Highlander by Jumel & Melonie Hughes
Highlander by Jumel & Melonie Hughes
Published: 2009/12/16
Channel: Jumel Hughes
Highland Center PSA
Highland Center PSA
Published: 2011/07/27
Channel: Bellevue Television
"We Shall Overcome" from FD-750, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
"We Shall Overcome" from FD-750, Highlander Research and Education Center Collection #20361
Published: 2017/06/27
Channel: sfolklife
Highlander Folk School: The Story Behind Myles Horton
Highlander Folk School: The Story Behind Myles Horton
Published: 2011/11/29
Channel: zdavis38
Highlander Center 80th Anniversary Celebration
Highlander Center 80th Anniversary Celebration
Published: 2012/09/01
Channel: Knoxville News Sentinel
Highlander Center   REVEAL DIGITAL
Highlander Center REVEAL DIGITAL
Published: 2015/08/12
Channel: Peggy Glahn
Highlander Center
Highlander Center's W7 II
Published: 2010/06/16
Channel: Pardo75
Myles Horton and the highlander folk school
Myles Horton and the highlander folk school
Published: 2015/03/23
Channel: Samson Wood-Phillips
I Am Here
I Am Here
Published: 2017/05/30
Channel: cdabsher
Preservation group hopes to buy historic property in Monteagle
Preservation group hopes to buy historic property in Monteagle
Published: 2016/10/03
Channel: The Tennessean
Robert Ben Garant - Highlander House Party, 11/22/08
Robert Ben Garant - Highlander House Party, 11/22/08
Published: 2008/12/04
Channel: highlandercenter
Myles Horton and the Highlander Folk School
Myles Horton and the Highlander Folk School
Published: 2012/10/01
Channel: Mark Chou
Myles Horton
Myles Horton
Published: 2014/08/03
Channel: Erin Karpinec
Highlander Folk School - Monteagle, Tennessee
Highlander Folk School - Monteagle, Tennessee
Published: 2009/09/25
Channel: Bob Hoagland
Highlander Center: Homecoming 2014
Highlander Center: Homecoming 2014
Published: 2013/10/06
Channel: BeMagazine1111
Ed Friend, Highlander Folk School (still images film), 1957
Ed Friend, Highlander Folk School (still images film), 1957
Published: 2013/05/30
Channel: Russell Library Audiovisual Collections
Public Outcry - Hard Times
Public Outcry - Hard Times
Published: 2009/09/07
Channel: Denton Loving
Jesuit Race War 4; Jews, Communist Highlander Folk School, Civil Rights Era
Jesuit Race War 4; Jews, Communist Highlander Folk School, Civil Rights Era
Published: 2017/08/10
Channel: Southern Israelite
People Of The Cumberland - 1937 Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42
People Of The Cumberland - 1937 Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42
Published: 2017/07/25
Channel: wdtvlive42 - Archive Footage
Alexandria A Highlander Piper
Alexandria A Highlander Piper
Published: 2013/05/29
Channel: Dianewashere2day
Copy of Alexandria A Highlander Piper
Copy of Alexandria A Highlander Piper
Published: 2013/06/19
Channel: Dianewashere2day
Ed Friend, Highlander Folk School film, 1957
Ed Friend, Highlander Folk School film, 1957
Published: 2013/05/30
Channel: Russell Library Audiovisual Collections
Tullahoma, Tn UU service-Scott Bates
Tullahoma, Tn UU service-Scott Bates
Published: 2007/01/17
Channel: Bill Davis
Remembering Guy Carawan and “We Shall Overcome”, Errol Brown, Johnny Gimble
Remembering Guy Carawan and “We Shall Overcome”, Errol Brown, Johnny Gimble
Published: 2015/06/02
Channel: Rememberingthepassed
Democracy Now: Utah Phillips talks about Myles Horton and the Highlander Folk School
Democracy Now: Utah Phillips talks about Myles Horton and the Highlander Folk School
Published: 2009/09/08
Channel: Open Songbook Project
Webinar: Countering Organized Hate
Webinar: Countering Organized Hate
Published: 2017/09/07
Channel: Epip Nat
Civil Rights Ride Documentary Tour of Highlander
Civil Rights Ride Documentary Tour of Highlander
Published: 2011/06/10
Channel: DeeDee
Myles Horton - Radical Hillbilly - A Wisdom Teacher for Activism and Civic Engagement
Myles Horton - Radical Hillbilly - A Wisdom Teacher for Activism and Civic Engagement
Published: 2013/06/13
Channel: pbriggsiam
You Cant Padlock an Idea Rhetorical Education at the Highlander Folk School 1932 1961 Studies in Rhe
You Cant Padlock an Idea Rhetorical Education at the Highlander Folk School 1932 1961 Studies in Rhe
Published: 2016/05/27
Channel: Sandra E.
Myles Horton Mash-Up!
Myles Horton Mash-Up!
Published: 2011/11/22
Channel: erinleighmonahan
2.13 - Training and Mobilization Efforts of the Highlander Folk School [From Freedom Rides to Fer...
2.13 - Training and Mobilization Efforts of the Highlander Folk School [From Freedom Rides to Fer...
Published: 2017/08/07
Channel: Garrett Skylar
Public Outcry - Sexton
Public Outcry - Sexton's Creek
Published: 2009/09/07
Channel: Denton Loving
Public Outcry - Can
Public Outcry - Can't Put it Back (The Reclamation Song)
Published: 2009/09/07
Channel: Denton Loving
Public Outcry - Cranks Creek
Public Outcry - Cranks Creek
Published: 2009/09/07
Channel: Denton Loving
Marquez Rhyne singing
Marquez Rhyne singing 'Deportees' at Highlander Center
Published: 2011/06/07
Channel: heyandile
TEAMSTER WOMEN present WE WERE NOT BORN TO FOLLOW 2013
TEAMSTER WOMEN present WE WERE NOT BORN TO FOLLOW 2013
Published: 2013/06/24
Channel: Dianewashere2day
2.7 - The Highlander Folk School [From Freedom Rides to Ferguson: Narratives of Nonviolence in th...
2.7 - The Highlander Folk School [From Freedom Rides to Ferguson: Narratives of Nonviolence in th...
Published: 2017/08/07
Channel: Garrett Skylar
Black & Brown Lives: Justice Over Social Divides (Promo)
Black & Brown Lives: Justice Over Social Divides (Promo)
Published: 2016/03/07
Channel: UALRTV
Public Outcry - ALL THAT WE HAVE
Public Outcry - ALL THAT WE HAVE
Published: 2009/09/07
Channel: Denton Loving
Chapter 2
Chapter 2
Published: 2011/06/04
Channel: MrJamolee
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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The Highlander Research and Education Center, formerly known as the Highlander Folk School, is a social justice leadership training school and cultural center located in New Market, Tennessee. Founded in 1932 by activist Myles Horton, educator Don West, and Methodist minister James A. Dombrowski, it was originally located in the community of Summerfield in Grundy County, Tennessee, between Monteagle and Tracy City. It was featured in the 1985 documentary film, You Got to Move. Much of the history was documented in the book “Or We’ll All Hang Separately: The Highlander Idea” by Thomas Bledsoe.

Highlander provides training and education for emerging and existing movement leaders throughout the South, Appalachia, and the world. Some of Highlander's earliest contributions were during the labor movement in Appalachia and throughout the Southern United States. During the 1950s, it played a critical role in the American Civil Rights Movement. It trained civil rights leader Rosa Parks prior to her historic role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, as well as providing training for many other movement activists, including members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Septima Clark, Anne Braden, Martin Luther King, Jr., James Bevel, Hollis Watkins, Bernard Lafayette, Ralph Abernathy and John Lewis in the mid- and-late 1950s. Backlash against the school's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement led to the school's closure by the state of Tennessee in 1961. Staff reorganized and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee, where they rechartered Highlander under the name "Highlander Research and Education Center." Highlander has been in its current (and longest consecutive) home in New Market, TN, since 1971.

History[edit]

Early years[edit]

The Highlander Folk School was originally established in Grundy County, Tennessee, on land donated for this purpose by educator Lilian Wyckoff Johnson. When Highlander was founded in 1932, the United States was in the midst of the Great Depression. Workers in all parts of the country were met with major resistance by employers when they tried to organize labor unions, especially in the South. Against that backdrop, Horton, West and Dombrowski created the Highlander School "to provide an educational center in the South for the training of rural and industrial leaders, and for the conservation and enrichment of the indigenous cultural values of the mountains." Horton was influenced by observing rural adult education schools in Denmark started in the 19th century by Danish Lutheran Bishop N. F. S. Grundtvig.[1] During the 1930s and 1940s, the school's main focus was labor education and the training of labor organizers.

Civil rights[edit]

In the 1950s, Highlander turned its energies to the rising issues of civil rights and desegregation. In addition to Myles Horton and others, a key figure during this period was John Beauchamp Thompson, a minister and educator who became one of the principal fund-raisers and speakers for the school.[citation needed] Highlander worked with Esau Jenkins of Johns Island to develop a literacy program for Blacks who were prevented from registering to vote by literacy requirements. The Citizenship Education Schools coordinated by Septima Clark with assistance from Bernice Robinson spread widely throughout the South and helped thousands of Blacks register to vote. Later, the program was transferred to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, because the state of Tennessee was threatening to close the school.

The civil rights anthem, "We Shall Overcome", was adapted from a gospel song, by Highlander music director Zilphia Horton, wife of Myles Horton, from the singing of striking tobacco factory workers in South Carolina in 1946. Shortly afterward, it was published by folksinger Pete Seeger in the People's Songs bulletin. It was revived at Highlander by Guy Carawan, who succeeded Zilphia Horton as Highlander's music director in 1959. Guy Carawan taught the song to SNCC at their first convening at Shaw University. The song has since spread and become one of the most recognizable movement songs in the world.[citation needed]

Backlash[edit]

In reaction to the school's work, during the late 1950s, Southern newspapers attacked Highlander for supposedly creating racial strife.[citation needed] In 1957, the Georgia Commission on Education published a pamphlet titled "Highlander Folk School: Communist Training School, Monteagle, Tennessee".[2] A controversial photograph of Martin Luther King and writer, trade union organizer, civil rights activist and co-founder of the Highlander School Donald Lee West, was published. According to information obtained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, West was the District Director of the Communist Party in North Carolina,[3] though West denied he had ever been a member of the Communist Party.[4] In 1961, the state of Tennessee revoked Highlander's charter, and confiscated and auctioned the school's land and property.[5] According to Septima Clark's autobiography, Echo In My Soul (page 225), the Highlander Folk School was closed, because it engaged in commercial activities in violation its charter . The Highlander Folk School was chartered by the State of Tennessee as a non-profit corporation without stockholders or owners. Once the State revoked its charter, no one could make a legal claim on any of the property. In 1961, the Highlander staff reincorporated as the Highlander Research and Education Center and moved to Knoxville. In 1971, it relocated to New Market, Tennessee.

Appalachian issues[edit]

In the 1960s and 1970s, Highlander focused on worker health and safety in the coalfields of Appalachia. Its leaders played a role in the emergence of the region's environmental justice movement.[citation needed] It helped start the Southern Appalachian Leadership Training (SALT) program, and coordinated a survey of land ownership in Appalachia. In the 1980s and 1990s, Highlander broadened their base into broader regional, national, and international environmentalism; struggles against the negative effects of globalization; grassroots leadership development in under-resourced communities. Beginning in the 1990s, became involved in LGBT issues, both in the U.S. and internationally.

Since 2000[edit]

Current focuses of Highlander include issues of democratic participation and economic justice, with a particular focus on youth, immigrants to the U.S. from Latin America, African Americans, LGBT, and poor white people.

In 2014, the Tennessee Preservation Trust placed the original Grundy County school building on its list of the ten most "endangered" historic sites in Tennessee.[6]

Directors[edit]

The directors of Highlander have been:

  • Myles Horton, 1932–1969
  • Frank T. Adams, 1970–1973
  • Mike Clark, 1973–1978
  • Helen Matthews Lewis, 1978–79 (acting)
  • Mike Clark, 1979–1984
  • Hubert E. Sapp, 1984–1993
  • John Gaventa, 1993–1996
  • Jim Sessions, 1996–1999
  • Suzanne Pharr, 1999–2003
  • Mónica Hernández and Tami Newman, interim co-directors 2004–2005
  • Pam McMichael, interim director, 2005; director from 2006

Tennessee Historical Commission Marker[edit]

A Tennessee Historical Commission Marker is present near the original location of the Highlander Folk School outside of Monteagle, Tennessee. The text of the marker reads:

2E 75
HIGHLANDER FOLK SCHOOL
1932-1962
In 1932, Myles Horton and Don West founded Highlander Folk School, located ½ mile north of this site. It quickly became one of the few schools in the South committed to the cause of organized labor, economic justice, and an end to racial segregation. Courses included labor issues, literacy, leadership, and non-violent desegregation strategies, with workshops led by Septima Clark. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, John Lewis, and Eleanor Roosevelt found inspiration for the modern civil rights movement there. Opponents of its causes tried to close the school.
Continued
(Back)
Following a 1959–1960 trial in Grundy County, the State of Tennessee revoked the school’s charter. It was adjudged to have violated segregation laws, sold beer without a license, and conveyed property to Myles Horton for his home. When the sheriff padlocked the school, Horton proclaimed Highlander to be an idea rather than simply a group of buildings, adding “You can’t padlock an idea.” In a 1979 Ford Foundation Report, Highlander was singled out as the most notable American experiment in adult education for social change.[citation needed]
Tennessee Historical Commission

Photo gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Donald N. Roberson, Jr., 2002, The Seeds of Social Change from Denmark
  2. ^ "Labor Day Weekend at Communist Training School," broadside published by Georgia Commission on Education, 1957, Series I., Subseries A, S. Ernest Vandiver collection, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, University of Georgia, Athens, as presented in the Digital Library of Georgia.
  3. ^ Federal Bureau of Investigation, Highlander Folk School
  4. ^ Interview with Don West, January 22, 1975. Interview E-0016. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007), Documenting the American South (DocSouth), University Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Jacquelyn Hall and Ray Faherty, interviewers.
  5. ^ John M. Glen, Highlander: No Ordinary School, The University Press of Kentucky, 1988, pp. 184–209.
  6. ^ "Nashville — all of it — named to 'endangered' list". Tennessean.com. October 29, 2014. Retrieved August 2, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Re: Workmen's Educational Association - San Francisco". H-LABOR@H-NET.MSU.EDU. 26 July 2000. Retrieved 7 February 2016. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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