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The Maastricht Treaty
The Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2013/05/20
Channel: Clemson Study Abroad
Maastricht: a blueprint for a new Europe
Maastricht: a blueprint for a new Europe
Published: 2011/07/20
Channel: EPP Group
BBC Six o
BBC Six o'clock news Maastricht treaty and Exchange Rate Mechanism problems 1993
Published: 2015/06/24
Channel: Philip Reed
Jeremy Corbyn on the European Union, the Maastricht Treaty, the euro
Jeremy Corbyn on the European Union, the Maastricht Treaty, the euro
Published: 2017/07/14
Channel: RainbowTRW
Maastricht Treaty
Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2014/10/10
Channel: Audiopedia
Maastricht Treaty Anniversary: 25 years since EU founding agreement signed
Maastricht Treaty Anniversary: 25 years since EU founding agreement signed
Published: 2017/02/07
Channel: TRT World
Breakfast with Frost: The Maastricht Treaty
Breakfast with Frost: The Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2015/01/23
Channel: Sir James Goldsmith
The EU Parliament and the Treaty of Lisbon.
The EU Parliament and the Treaty of Lisbon.
Published: 2009/05/21
Channel: instantknowhow
When Was The Maastricht Treaty Signed?
When Was The Maastricht Treaty Signed?
Published: 2017/08/30
Channel: Dead Question
On the Record - Maastricht Vote
On the Record - Maastricht Vote
Published: 2011/12/27
Channel: UncleGagag
What 1992 means to Cork people in 1989 - Maastricht Treaty
What 1992 means to Cork people in 1989 - Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2014/01/30
Channel: killianM2
BBC Six o
BBC Six o'clock news Maastricht treaty and Exchange Rate Mechanism problems 1993
Published: 2009/10/15
Channel: Philip Reed
Maastricht Treaty
Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2012/10/24
Channel: Christopher Hunt
Lady Thatcher:  Maastricht treaty
Lady Thatcher: Maastricht treaty
Published: 2016/06/01
Channel: TheChrisg00
Prof. Joan Muysken On the Treaty of Maastricht and Deanship
Prof. Joan Muysken On the Treaty of Maastricht and Deanship
Published: 2013/11/19
Channel: School of Business and Economics
Twenty five years on, the Maastricht Treaty looks hopelessly optimistic
Twenty five years on, the Maastricht Treaty looks hopelessly optimistic
Published: 2017/02/07
Channel: euronews (in English)
Maastricht Treaty
Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2013/07/07
Channel: peter carter
Maastricht Treaty Turns 25 Years Old
Maastricht Treaty Turns 25 Years Old
Published: 2017/02/07
Channel: NTDTV
The Maastricht Treaty
The Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2012/11/20
Channel: Ryan Wyatt
What Is The Treaty Of Maastricht?
What Is The Treaty Of Maastricht?
Published: 2017/09/09
Channel: Funny Question
EU festival marks 25th anniversary of Maastricht treaty signing
EU festival marks 25th anniversary of Maastricht treaty signing
Published: 2017/02/07
Channel: Al Jazeera English
Europe Calling - celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty
Europe Calling - celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2017/08/09
Channel: Breaking Maas
Newsnight 1992 report on Maastrict rebellion against John Major
Newsnight 1992 report on Maastrict rebellion against John Major
Published: 2016/01/06
Channel: Lost in Transmission
Maastricht montage - 20 years on: BBC World News
Maastricht montage - 20 years on: BBC World News
Published: 2011/12/22
Channel: jamesharrod
Musical Postcards at 25 years Treaty of Maastricht - Fleeing for Dreams
Musical Postcards at 25 years Treaty of Maastricht - Fleeing for Dreams
Published: 2016/12/14
Channel: Musical Postcards
The treaty of Maastricht
The treaty of Maastricht
Published: 2014/05/03
Channel: Alice Spallino
Panorama Great Europe Debate  9 Dec 91
Panorama Great Europe Debate 9 Dec 91
Published: 2014/06/29
Channel: Daniel Hope
Signing of the Maastricht Treaty
Signing of the Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2013/05/20
Channel: adventuretrex
City: Maastricht | Euromaxx
City: Maastricht | Euromaxx
Published: 2013/08/27
Channel: DW English
Signing of the Maastricht Treaty
Signing of the Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2017/05/11
Channel: Doug Eveleigh
Maastricht Treaty 25th anniversary - did anyone notice | February 8, 2017
Maastricht Treaty 25th anniversary - did anyone notice | February 8, 2017
Published: 2017/02/08
Channel: UKIP News
Predicting a narrow win for the Treaty of Maastricht
Predicting a narrow win for the Treaty of Maastricht
Published: 2016/03/29
Channel: Tell History
EMN News TV 2nd Broadcast - Maastricht Treaty
EMN News TV 2nd Broadcast - Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2012/03/17
Channel: EuroMUN Maastricht
What Is The Treaty Of Maastricht?
What Is The Treaty Of Maastricht?
Published: 2017/08/12
Channel: Omega Omega
Jean-Claude Juncker speech on the 25th anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty
Jean-Claude Juncker speech on the 25th anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2016/12/10
Channel: AlphaX News
Ken Clarke recalls eurosceptic Maastricht Treaty fears
Ken Clarke recalls eurosceptic Maastricht Treaty fears
Published: 2012/11/06
Channel: bapiba
History of the European Union (1945-2015)
History of the European Union (1945-2015)
Published: 2015/11/30
Channel: Serbian Mapping
Nigel Farage speech in Switzerland
Nigel Farage speech in Switzerland
Published: 2014/10/15
Channel: RobbingHoodUK
Norman Lamont signing Maastricht Treaty 25 years ago today | 2/8/2017
Norman Lamont signing Maastricht Treaty 25 years ago today | 2/8/2017
Published: 2017/02/08
Channel: UKIP News
The Maastricht Treaty: Taking Stock After 20 Years
The Maastricht Treaty: Taking Stock After 20 Years
Published: 2012/02/13
Channel: Maastricht University
Maastricht, City of the Meuse River and Maastricht Treaty
Maastricht, City of the Meuse River and Maastricht Treaty
Published: 2015/04/06
Channel: Djadja Sardjana
"No clause in the Maastricht Treaty" - Greece
"No clause in the Maastricht Treaty" - Greece's debt crisis a first of its kind
Published: 2011/06/11
Channel: CUHellenic
Susan George Maastricht to the new Fiscal Treaty
Susan George Maastricht to the new Fiscal Treaty
Published: 2012/03/01
Channel: Transnational Institute
Frm Dutch PM Kok: Maastricht Treaty has inefficiencies to be addressed
Frm Dutch PM Kok: Maastricht Treaty has inefficiencies to be addressed
Published: 2015/07/30
Channel: AP Archive
Maastricht Treaty turns 20 as euro crisis continues
Maastricht Treaty turns 20 as euro crisis continues
Published: 2012/02/07
Channel: EURACTIV
European Union knowingly deceiving and betraying the British people into European rule
European Union knowingly deceiving and betraying the British people into European rule
Published: 2013/04/28
Channel: ITZOUTTHERE
On the Record: 03.12.95
On the Record: 03.12.95
Published: 2015/01/29
Channel: Sir James Goldsmith
25th Anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty - European Committee of the regions
25th Anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty - European Committee of the regions
Published: 2017/02/09
Channel: European Committee of the Regions
Bill Cash, Why I voted against Maastricht
Bill Cash, Why I voted against Maastricht
Published: 2016/12/07
Channel: Channel Brexit
When Was The Maastricht Treaty Signed?
When Was The Maastricht Treaty Signed?
Published: 2017/08/25
Channel: Queen Queen
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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Maastricht Treaty
Treaty on European Union
Type Amending treaty
Signed 7 February 1992
Location Maastricht, Netherlands
Effective 1 November 1993
Signatories
Citations
Languages
Treaty on European Union at Wikisource

After amendments made by the Maastricht Treaty:
Consolidated version of EURATOM treaty (1992)

Consolidated version of the ECSC treaty (1992)
Consolidated version of TEEC - now TEC (1992)
Flag of Europe.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
European Union

The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty on European Union or TEU) undertaken to integrate Europe was signed on 7 February 1992 by the members of the European Community in Maastricht, Netherlands.[1] On 9–10 December 1991, the same city hosted the European Council which drafted the treaty.[2] Upon its entry into force on 1 November 1993 during the Delors Commission,[3] it created the three pillars structure of the European Union and led to the creation of the single European currency, the euro.

TEU comprised two novel titles respectively on Common Foreign and Security Policy and Cooperation in the Fields of Justice and Home Affairs, which replaced the former informal intergovernmental cooperation bodies named TREVI and European Political Cooperation on EU Foreign policy coordination. In addition TEU also comprised three titles which amended the three pre-existing community treaties: Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, Treaty establishing the European Coal and Steel Community, and the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community which had its abbreviation renamed from TEEC to TEC (being known as TFEU since 2007).

The Maastricht Treaty (TEU) and all pre-existing treaties, has subsequently been further amended by the treaties of Amsterdam (1997), Nice (2001) and Lisbon (2009).

Content[edit]

The treaty led to the creation of the euro. One of the obligations of the treaty for the members was to keep "sound fiscal policies, with debt limited to 60% of GDP and annual deficits no greater than 3% of GDP".[4]

The treaty also created what was commonly referred to as the pillar structure of the European Union.

The treaty established the three pillars of the European Union—one supranational pillar created from three European Communities (which included the European Community (EC), the European Coal and Steel Community and the European Atomic Energy Community), the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) pillar, and the Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) pillar. The first pillar was where the EU's supra-national institutions—the Commission, the European Parliament and the European Court of Justice—had the most power and influence. The other two pillars were essentially more intergovernmental in nature with decisions being made by committees composed of member states' politicians and officials.[5]

All three pillars were the extensions of existing policy structures. The European Community pillar was the continuation of the European Economic Community with the "Economic" being dropped from the name to represent the wider policy base given by the Maastricht Treaty. Coordination in foreign policy had taken place since the beginning of the 1970s under the name of European Political Cooperation (EPC), which had been first written into the treaties by the Single European Act but not as a part of the EEC. While the Justice and Home Affairs pillar extended cooperation in law enforcement, criminal justice, asylum, and immigration and judicial cooperation in civil matters, some of these areas had already been subject to intergovernmental cooperation under the Schengen Implementation Convention of 1990.

The creation of the pillar system was the result of the desire by many member states to extend the European Economic Community to the areas of foreign policy, military, criminal justice, and judicial cooperation. This desire was set off against the misgivings of other member states, notably the United Kingdom, over adding areas which they considered to be too sensitive to be managed by the supra-national mechanisms of the European Economic Community. The agreed compromise was that instead of renaming the European Economic Community as the European Union, the treaty would establish a legally separate European Union comprising the renamed European Economic Community, and the inter-governmental policy areas of foreign policy, military, criminal justice, judicial cooperation. The structure greatly limited the powers of the European Commission, the European Parliament and the European Court of Justice to influence the new intergovernmental policy areas, which were to be contained with the second and third pillars: foreign policy and military matters (the CFSP pillar) and criminal justice and cooperation in civil matters (the JHA pillar).

In addition, the treaty established the European Committee of the Regions (CoR). CoR is the European Union's (EU) assembly of local and regional representatives that provides sub-national authorities (i.e. regions, municipalities, cities, etc.) with a direct voice within the EU's institutional framework.

The Maastricht criteria[edit]

The Maastricht criteria (also known as the convergence criteria) are the criteria for European Union member states to enter the third stage of European Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and adopt the euro as their currency. The four criteria are defined in article 121 of the treaty establishing the European Community. They impose control over inflation, public debt and the public deficit, exchange rate stability and the convergence of interest rates.

1. Inflation rates: No more than 1.5 percentage points higher than the average of the three best performing (lowest inflation) member states of the EU.

2. Government finance:

Annual government deficit:
The ratio of the annual government deficit to gross domestic product (GDP) must not exceed 3% at the end of the preceding fiscal year. If not, it is at least required to reach a level close to 3%. Only exceptional and temporary excesses would be granted for exceptional cases.
Government debt:
The ratio of gross government debt to GDP must not exceed 60% at the end of the preceding fiscal year. Even if the target cannot be achieved due to the specific conditions, the ratio must have sufficiently diminished and must be approaching the reference value at a satisfactory pace. As of the end of 2014, of the countries in the Eurozone, only Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Luxembourg, and Finland still met this target.[6]

3. Exchange rate: Applicant countries should have joined the exchange-rate mechanism (ERM II) under the European Monetary System (EMS) for two consecutive years and should not have devalued its currency during the period.

4. Long-term interest rates: The nominal long-term interest rate must not be more than 2 percentage points higher than in the three lowest inflation member states.

The purpose of setting the criteria is to maintain price stability within the Eurozone even with the inclusion of new member states.[4]

Signing[edit]

Stone memorial in front of the entry to the Limburg Province government building in Maastricht, Netherlands, commemorating the signing of the Maastricht Treaty

The signing of the Treaty of Maastricht took place in Maastricht, Netherlands, on 7 February 1992. The Dutch government, by virtue of holding Presidency of the Council of the European Union during the negotiations in the second half of 1991, arranged a ceremony inside the government buildings of the Limburg province on the river Maas (Meuse). Representatives from the twelve member states of the European Communities were present, and signed the treaty as plenipotentiaries, marking the conclusion of the period of negotiations.

Ratification[edit]

The process of ratifying the treaty was fraught with difficulties in three states. In Denmark, the first Danish Maastricht Treaty referendum was held on 2 June 1992 and ratification of the treaty was rejected by a margin of 50.7% to 49.3%.[7] Subsequently, alterations were made to the treaty through the addition of the Edinburgh Agreement which lists four Danish exceptions, and this treaty was ratified the following year on 18 May 1993 after a second referendum was held in Denmark,[8] with legal effect after the formally granted royal assent on 9 June 1993.[9]

In September 1992, a referendum in France only narrowly supported the ratification of the treaty, with 50.8% in favour. Uncertainty over the Danish and French referendums was one of the causes of the turmoil on the currency markets in September 1992, which led to the UK pound's expulsion from the Exchange Rate Mechanism.[citation needed]

In the United Kingdom, an opt-out from the treaty's social provisions was opposed in Parliament by the opposition Labour and Liberal Democrat MPs and the treaty itself by the Maastricht Rebels within the governing Conservative Party. The number of rebels exceeded the Conservative majority in the House of Commons, and thus the government of John Major came close to losing the confidence of the House.[10] In accordance with British constitutional convention, specifically that of parliamentary sovereignty, ratification in the UK was not subject to approval by referendum.

EU evolution timeline[edit]

Signed:
In force:
Document:
1948
1948
Brussels
Treaty
1951
1952
Paris
Treaty
1954
1955
Modified
Brussels
Treaty
1957
1958
Rome
Treaty
&
EURATOM
1965
1967
Merger
Treaty
1975
1976
Council
Agreement
on TREVI
1986
1987
Single
European
Act
1985+90
1995
Schengen
Treaty
&
Convention
1992
1993
Maastricht Treaty (TEU)
1997
1999
Amsterdam
Treaty
2001
2003
Nice
Treaty
2007
2009
Lisbon
Treaty
 
Content: (founded WUDO) (founded ECSC) (protocol amending WUDO to become WEU) (founded EEC and EURATOM) (merging the legislative & administrative bodies of the 3 European communities) (founded TREVI) (amended: EURATOM, ECSC, EEC)+
(founded EPC)
(founded Schengen)
(implemented Schengen)
(amended: EURATOM, ECSC, and EEC to transform it into EC)+
(founded: JHA+CFSP)
(amended: EURATOM, ECSC, EC to also contain Schengen, and TEU where PJCC replaced JHA) (amended with focus on institutional changes: EURATOM, ECSC, EC and TEU) (abolished the 3 pillars and WEU by amending: EURATOM, EC=>TFEU, and TEU)
(founded EU as an overall legal unit with Charter of Fundamental Rights, and reformed governance structures & decision procedures)
 
                         
Three pillars of the European Union:  
European Communities
(with a single Commission & Council)
 
European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM)   
European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) Treaty expired in 2002 European Union (EU)
    European Economic Community (EEC)   European Community (EC)
        Schengen Rules  
    Terrorism, Radicalism, Extremism and Violence Internationally (TREVI) Justice and Home Affairs
(JHA)
  Police and Judicial Co-operation in Criminal Matters (PJCC)
  European Political Cooperation (EPC) Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP)
Western Union Defence Organization (WUDO) Western European Union (WEU)    
Treaty terminated in 2011    
                     

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1990-1999". The history of the European Union - 1990-1999. Europa. Retrieved 1 September 2011. 
  2. ^ "1991". The EU at a glance - The History of the European Union. Europa. Retrieved 9 April 2010. 
  3. ^ "1993". The EU at a glance - The History of the European Union. Europa. Archived from the original on 14 December 2007. Retrieved 9 April 2010. 
  4. ^ a b . Hubbard, Glenn and Tim Kane. (2013). Balance: The Economics of Great Powers From Ancient Rome to Modern America . Simon & Schuster. P. 204. ISBN 978-1-4767-0025-0
  5. ^ "Treaties and law". European Union. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  6. ^ "Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table". ec.europa.eu. 
  7. ^ Havemann, Joel (4 June 1992). "EC Leaders at Sea Over Danish Rejection: Europe: Vote against Maastricht Treaty blocks the march to unity. Expansion plans may also be in jeopardy". LA Times. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  8. ^ "In Depth: Maastricht Treaty". BBC News. 30 April 2001. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "Lov om Danmarks tiltrædelse af Edinburgh-Afgørelsen og Maastricht-Traktaten (*1)" (in Danish). Retsinformation. 9 June 1993. 
  10. ^ Goodwin, Stephen (23 July 1993). "The Maastricht Debate: Major 'driven to confidence factor': Commons Exchanges: Treaty issue 'cannot fester any longer'". The Independent. London. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 

External links[edit]

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