Share

WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Motosacoche 2 C 10 Sport 500 cc 1925
1932 Motosacoche Jubile 424
Early Motosacoche motor-bicycle, photo around 1905
Share of the Motosacoche SA, issued 1905[1]

Motosacoche was founded in 1899, by Henri and Armand Dufaux, in Geneva, Switzerland. Motosacoche was once the biggest Swiss motorcycle manufacturer, known also for its MAG (Motosacoche Acacias Genève) proprietary-engines used by other European motorcycle manufacturers.[2]

History[edit]

From 1900 Motosacoche produced a bicycle auxiliary engine, in a subframe that could be installed into a conventional bicycle. This looked like an engine in a bag, hence the Motosacoche name, meaning "engine in a bag".

In 1910 Royal Enfield used Motosacoche 344 cc 2.75 hp engines in a successful V-twin model. They are reputed to have supplied Triumph, Ariel, Matchless and Brough-Superior with engines at times too, first through H & A Dufaux England Ltd, and then, by 1912, Motosacoche Ltd (GB), with Osborne Louis De Lissa. Motosacoche had factories in Switzerland, France and Italy, and supplied MAG engines to continental manufacturers including Clement, Condor, Imperia, Neander and Monet Goyon.[3][4]

When the Bol d'Or 24-hour event was first held on the outskirts of Paris in 1922 the winning rider covered more than 750 miles (1206 kilometres) on a 500 cc Motosacoche.[5]

It was not until 1928 that they made a name in the Grand Prix, with the Motosacoche 350 M 35 ohc racing bike, built by Dougal Marchant, of England, ridden to two European championship titles, 350 and 500, by Wal Handley.[6]

Bert le Vack joined Motosacoche in the late 1920s. He had ridden in the 1914 Isle of Man Tourist Trophy and became the works rider, chief designer and tuner. Le Vack was killed in an accident in the Swiss Alps on 17 September 1931, while testing the Motosacoche A50 on public roads close to their factory.[7]

During the 1930s Motosacoche were eclipsed by the Norton Motorcycle Company and went into decline. After World War II, an unusual Marchant designed 200 cc sv was shown in 1947, but not produced. In 1953 Richard Kuchen designed German UT motorcycles were marketed under the Motosacoche name, but this was unsuccessful, and by 1956 motorcycles were no longer produced, but MAG stationary and industrial motors continued.[2]

Models[edit]

  • 1C9H Sport, 1928–39, 498 cc, o.h.v.,20 hp
  • 2 Cylinders, 1930 & 1932
  • 209, 1928
  • 210, 1928 & 1929
  • 212 twin, 1954, 247 cc, o.h.c
  • 2C7, 1914, 496 cc, s.v.
  • 304 Tourer, 1927, 346 cc, i.o.e.
  • 309, 1928
  • 310, 1928 & 1929
  • 310 BL, 1933
  • 318, 1933
  • 319, 1933
  • 322 Competition, 1933
  • 350 Competition, 1930 & 1932
  • 350 Sport, 1930 & 1932
  • 350 Tourer, 1930 & 1932
  • 409, 1928 & 1929
  • 409 BL, 1933
  • 410, 1928 & 1929
  • 410 LL, 1933
  • 419, 1933
  • 420, 1933
  • 422 Competition, 1933
  • 425 Luxe, 1933
  • 426 Luxe, 1933
  • 439 Tourisme Luxe, 1939, 498 cc, s.v.
  • 500 Competition, 1930 & 1932
  • 500 Sport, 1930 & 1932
  • 500 Touring, 1930 & 1932
  • 720, 1933
  • 720 Tourisme Grand Luxe, 1939, 846 cc, s.v.
  • A1, 1908, 214 cc, a.i.o.e
  • A50 (works racer), 1928, o.h.c.
  • BL, 1929 & 1930
  • Jubilee Sport, 1931, 498 cc, o.h.v.
  • L, 1928
  • R10H, 1929
  • R14H, 1929 & 1930
  • R14K, 1929
  • R9K, 1930
  • 877TL, 1931 & 1932[8][9]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ Suppes 94/95 Historische Wertpapiere. WWA Bernd Suppes. 1994. p. 466. ISSN 0936-9406. 
  2. ^ a b [1] Albisteam.ch Motosacoche History (retrieved 25 December 2006).
  3. ^ [2] Cybermotorcycle.com Motosacoche (retrieved 25 December 2006).
  4. ^ [3] Benvanhelden.nl Condor (retrieved 25 December 2006).
  5. ^ [4] Is-it-a-lemon.com Endurance Racing (retrieved 27 December 2006).
  6. ^ [5] Archived 2007-12-02 at the Wayback Machine. Krackowizer Motorcycle Histories (retrieved 22 October 2006).
  7. ^ "Memorial to Bert le Vack". Retrieved 2008-07-16. [permanent dead link]
  8. ^ [6] JLBcreations.com Motosacoche models (retrieved 26 December 2006).
  9. ^ [7] Benvanhelden.nl History of Swiss Motosacoche (retrieved 26 December 2006).

External links[edit]

Disclaimer

None of the audio/visual content is hosted on this site. All media is embedded from other sites such as GoogleVideo, Wikipedia, YouTube etc. Therefore, this site has no control over the copyright issues of the streaming media.

All issues concerning copyright violations should be aimed at the sites hosting the material. This site does not host any of the streaming media and the owner has not uploaded any of the material to the video hosting servers. Anyone can find the same content on Google Video or YouTube by themselves.

The owner of this site cannot know which documentaries are in public domain, which has been uploaded to e.g. YouTube by the owner and which has been uploaded without permission. The copyright owner must contact the source if he wants his material off the Internet completely.

Powered by YouTube
Wikipedia content is licensed under the GFDL and (CC) license