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Step 1 USMLE Tutorial - Systemic Mycoses
Step 1 USMLE Tutorial - Systemic Mycoses
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2
COMLEX USMLE Board Review Lectures Fungal Infections and Systemic Mycosis
COMLEX USMLE Board Review Lectures Fungal Infections and Systemic Mycosis
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Histopathology Skin--Mycosis fungoides
Histopathology Skin--Mycosis fungoides
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Mycosis Fungoides ¦ Treatment and Symptoms
Mycosis Fungoides ¦ Treatment and Symptoms
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Mycosis Fungoides and Cutaneous Lymphomas
Mycosis Fungoides and Cutaneous Lymphomas
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Mycosis Fungoides Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma
Mycosis Fungoides Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma
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Mycosis on skin and scalp
Mycosis on skin and scalp
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Fungal infection : mycosis
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mucor mycosis nose and sinuses debridement
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Reflexor - Revenge Of The Mycosis
Reflexor - Revenge Of The Mycosis
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leiurus quinquestriatus mycosis
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Pronounce Medical Words ― Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides And The Sezary Syndrome
Pronounce Medical Words ― Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides And The Sezary Syndrome
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Mycosis Fungoides Products Market Pipeline Review, H1 2014
Mycosis Fungoides Products Market Pipeline Review, H1 2014
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Panoptical Mycosis - "Negligent Glimpse Of Unrestrained Sacrifice"
Panoptical Mycosis - "Negligent Glimpse Of Unrestrained Sacrifice"
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Case study: Folliculotropic mycosis fungoides
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How to Pronounce Mycosis
How to Pronounce Mycosis
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How to pronounce mycosis
How to pronounce mycosis
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Pronounce Medical Words ― Mycosis Fungoides Plaque
Pronounce Medical Words ― Mycosis Fungoides Plaque
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Sezary Syndrome (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma) or Mycosis Fungoides
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Adult T cell Lymphoma & Mycosis Fnugoides / Sezary Syndrome (cutaneous T-cell Lymphome)
Adult T cell Lymphoma & Mycosis Fnugoides / Sezary Syndrome (cutaneous T-cell Lymphome)
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Pronounce Medical Words ― Mycosis Fungoides Patch
Pronounce Medical Words ― Mycosis Fungoides Patch
::2014/05/01::
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22
Pronounce Medical Words ― Mycosis Fungoides
Pronounce Medical Words ― Mycosis Fungoides
::2014/05/01::
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Panoptical Mycosis - Impoveristic Goat Triumphal
Panoptical Mycosis - Impoveristic Goat Triumphal
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Pronounce Medical Words ― Stage I Mycosis Fungoides And The Sezary Syndrome
Pronounce Medical Words ― Stage I Mycosis Fungoides And The Sezary Syndrome
::2014/05/08::
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Mycosis - First Reharsal
Mycosis - First Reharsal's HIGHLIGHTS Compilation
::2013/04/10::
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Warts - Mycosis say Shifa
Warts - Mycosis say Shifa
::2012/03/22::
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Pronounce Medical Words ― Stage II Mycosis Fungoides And The Sezary Syndrome
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::2014/05/09::
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Mycosis animation - אנימציית הסבר על פטרת
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How to Say or Pronounce Mycosis Fungoides
How to Say or Pronounce Mycosis Fungoides
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Mycosis - Test des riffs avec drums
Mycosis - Test des riffs avec drums
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Reflexor - Revenge Of The Mycosis
Reflexor - Revenge Of The Mycosis
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nasal aspergilosis, nasal mycosis in dog, CT, www.CTinvet.com, www.veterinabrandys.cz
nasal aspergilosis, nasal mycosis in dog, CT, www.CTinvet.com, www.veterinabrandys.cz
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How to Say or Pronounce Stage III Mycosis Fungoides And The Sezary Syndrome
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::2013/08/19::
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ParaProtex - CaliVita - MYCOSIS, PARASITES
ParaProtex - CaliVita - MYCOSIS, PARASITES
::2009/03/03::
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Mycosis - Test des riffs avec drums II
Mycosis - Test des riffs avec drums II
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PANOPTICAL MYCOSIS - Eradication Paroxysm (split-tape)
PANOPTICAL MYCOSIS - Eradication Paroxysm (split-tape)
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Regenbogenland - Mycosis (Version 20080101)
Regenbogenland - Mycosis (Version 20080101)
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How to Say or Pronounce Mycosis Fungoides Plaque
How to Say or Pronounce Mycosis Fungoides Plaque
::2013/08/14::
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nasal mycosis in dog, www.ctinvet.com
nasal mycosis in dog, www.ctinvet.com
::2011/02/14::
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HAIR FROM NOSE green rotten toe nail from mycosis
HAIR FROM NOSE green rotten toe nail from mycosis
::2011/08/24::
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45
CSI Wellington-Guttural Mycosis
CSI Wellington-Guttural Mycosis
::2013/01/23::
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Mycosis canta: Locutor
Mycosis canta: Locutor
::2007/11/16::
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Mycosis canta: Pura Magia (continuação)
Mycosis canta: Pura Magia (continuação)
::2007/11/16::
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Mycosis canta: Dona de Mim
Mycosis canta: Dona de Mim
::2007/11/16::
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Mold and Mycoses (Fungus Diseases) - Rife Frequencies
Mold and Mycoses (Fungus Diseases) - Rife Frequencies
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strown mycosis charquid
strown mycosis charquid
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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"Mycoses" redirects here. For the journal, see Mycoses (journal).
Mycosis
Classification and external resources
Pulmonary aspergillosis.jpg
Micrograph showing a mycosis (aspergillosis). The Aspergillus (which is spaghetti-like) is seen in the center and surrounded by inflammatory cells and necrotic debris. H&E stain.
ICD-10 B35-B49
ICD-9 110-118.99
DiseasesDB 28821
MeSH D009181

Mycosis (plural: mycoses) is a fungal infection of animals, including humans.[1] Mycoses are common and a variety of environmental and physiological conditions can contribute to the development of fungal diseases. Inhalation of fungal spores or localized colonization of the skin may initiate persistent infections; therefore, mycoses often start in the lungs or on the skin.[2]

Fungal infections of the skin was the 4th most common disease in 2010 affecting 984 million people.[3]

Causes[edit]

People are at risk of fungal infections when they are taking strong antibiotics for a long period of time because antibiotics kill not only damaging bacteria, but healthy bacteria as well. This alters the balance of microorganisms in the mouth, vagina, intestines and other places in the body, and results in an overgrowth of fungus.

Individuals with weakened immune systems are also at risk of developing fungal infections. This is the case of people with HIV/AIDS, people under steroid treatments, and people taking chemotherapy. People with diabetes also tend to develop fungal infections.[4] Very young and very old people, also, are groups at risk.[5]

Classification[edit]

Mycoses are classified according to the tissue levels initially colonized.

Superficial mycoses[edit]

Superficial mycoses are limited to the outermost layers of the skin and hair.[6]

An example of such a fungal infection is Tinea versicolor, a fungus infection that commonly affects the skin of young people, especially the chest, back, and upper arms and legs. Tinea versicolor is caused by a fungus that lives in the skin of some adults. It does not usually affect the face. This fungus produces spots that are either lighter than the skin or a reddish-brown.[7] This fungus exists in two forms, one of them causing visible spots. Factors that can cause the fungus to become more visible include high humidity, as well as immune or hormone abnormalities. However, almost all people with this very common condition are healthy.

Cutaneous mycoses[edit]

Cutaneous mycoses extend deeper into the epidermis, and also include invasive hair and nail diseases. These diseases are restricted to the keratinized layers of the skin, hair, and nails. Unlike the superficial mycoses, host immune responses may be evoked resulting in pathologic changes expressed in the deeper layers of the skin. The organisms that cause these diseases are called dermatophytes. The resulting diseases are often called ringworm (even though there is no worm involved) or tinea. Cutaneous mycoses are caused by Microsporum, Trichophyton, and Epidermophyton fungi, which together comprise 41 species.

One common disease is the athlete's foot which most commonly affects children before puberty. It is divided in three categories: chronic interdigital athlete's foot, chronic scaly athlete's foot, and acute vesicular athlete's foot.[8]

Subcutaneous mycoses[edit]

Subcutaneous mycoses involve the dermis, subcutaneous tissues, muscle and fascia. These infections are chronic and can be initiated by piercing trauma to the skin which allows the fungi to enter. These infections are difficult to treat and may require surgical interventions such as debridement.

Systemic mycoses due to primary pathogens[edit]

Systemic mycoses due to primary pathogens originate primarily in the lungs and may spread to many organ systems. Organisms that cause systemic mycoses are inherently virulent. In general primary pathogens that cause systemic mycoses are dimorphic.

Systemic mycoses due to opportunistic pathogens[edit]

Systemic mycoses due to opportunistic pathogens are infections of patients with immune deficiencies who would otherwise not be infected. Examples of immunocompromised conditions include AIDS, alteration of normal flora by antibiotics, immunosuppressive therapy, and metastatic cancer. Examples of opportunistic mycoses include Candidiasis, Cryptococcosis and Aspergillosis.

Prevention[edit]

Keeping the skin clean and dry, as well as maintaining good hygiene, will help larger topical mycoses. Because fungal infections are contagious, it is important to wash after touching other people or animals. Sports clothing should also be washed after use.

Treatment[edit]

Antifungal drugs are used to treat mycoses. Depending on the nature of the infection, a topical or systemic agent may be used.

An example of antifungal is fluconazole, or Diflucan, which is the basis of many over-the-counter antifungal treatments. Another example is amphotericin B (the A form being toxic) which is more potent. It is used in the treatment of the most severe fungal infections that show resistance to other forms of treatment and it is administered intravenously.[9]

Drugs to treat skin infections are Tolnaftate (Tinactin), an over the counter topical; Ketoconazole, especially used to treat tinea versicolor and other dermatophytes; Itraconazole; Terbinafine (Lamisil); Echinocandins (caspofungin); Griseofulvin, commonly used for infections involving the scalp and nails.[10]

Yeast infections in the vagina, caused by Candida albicans, can be treated with medicated suppositories such as tioconazole and pessaries whereas skin yeast infections are treated with medicated ointments.[11]

Epidemiology[edit]

Fungal infections of the skin with the 4th most common disease in 2010 affecting 984 million people.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dorlands Medical Dictionary:mycosis". 
  2. ^ "What Is a Fungal Infection?". Retrieved May 26, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b Hay, RJ; Johns, NE; Williams, HC; Bolliger, IW; Dellavalle, RP; Margolis, DJ; Marks, R; Naldi, L; Weinstock, MA; Wulf, SK; Michaud, C; J L Murray, C; Naghavi, M (Oct 28, 2013). "The Global Burden of Skin Disease in 2010: An Analysis of the Prevalence and Impact of Skin Conditions.". The Journal of investigative dermatology. PMID 24166134. 
  4. ^ "Thrush in Men". NHS. Retrieved 2013-07-13. 
  5. ^ "Fungal infections: Introduction". Retrieved May 26, 2010. 
  6. ^ Malcolm D. Richardson, David W. Warnock. "Introduction". Fungal Infection: Diagnosis and Management. John Wiley & Sons, 2012. p. 5. 
  7. ^ "Tinea versicolor". Royal Berkshire NHS. Retrieved 12/7/2013. 
  8. ^ "Athlete's Foot". Retrieved May 26, 2010. 
  9. ^ "What is a mycosis? causes, symptoms and treatments". Retrieved May 26, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Therapy". Retrieved May 26, 2010. 
  11. ^ "How Are Yeast Infections Treated?". Retrieved May 26, 2010. 

External links[edit]

  • Guide to Fungal Infections - Patient-oriented, educational website written by dermatologists.
  • Doctor Fungus - An educational website sponsored through unrestricted educational grants by numerous pharmaceutical companies
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