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National Trade Council
National Trade Council's Navarro on U.S. Trade Deficits
Published: 2017/03/31
Channel: Bloomberg Politics
Peter Navarro, "Crouching Tiger: What China
Peter Navarro, "Crouching Tiger: What China's Militarism Means for the World"
Published: 2016/01/25
Channel: BookTV
Death By China: How America Lost Its Manufacturing Base (Official Version)
Death By China: How America Lost Its Manufacturing Base (Official Version)
Published: 2016/04/10
Channel: DeathByChina
Peter Navarro: Corporations in U.S. can
Peter Navarro: Corporations in U.S. can't operate on level playing field
Published: 2017/01/24
Channel: Fox Business
Peter Navarro: Dow 25,000 Within Donald Trump
Peter Navarro: Dow 25,000 Within Donald Trump's First Term | Squawk Box | CNBC
Published: 2016/11/09
Channel: CNBC
Peter Navarro with Maria Bartiromo Fox News 2017 0129
Peter Navarro with Maria Bartiromo Fox News 2017 0129
Published: 2017/01/30
Channel: 38abigail83
.@fordschool - Peter Navarro on U.S.-China relations and trade
.@fordschool - Peter Navarro on U.S.-China relations and trade
Published: 2017/01/16
Channel: Ford School
Peter Navarro: We Will Renegotiate Bad Trade Deals | Squawk Box | CNBC
Peter Navarro: We Will Renegotiate Bad Trade Deals | Squawk Box | CNBC
Published: 2017/01/25
Channel: CNBC
Death By China
Death By China
Published: 2013/04/25
Channel: Virgil Films and Entertainment
White House trade advisor Navarro on NAFTA
White House trade advisor Navarro on NAFTA
Published: 2017/03/31
Channel: Fox Business
Things You Didn
Things You Didn't Know About Peter Navarro
Published: 2017/03/11
Channel: Celebrities TV
Peter Navarro: Trump’s trade policy will be great for the world
Peter Navarro: Trump’s trade policy will be great for the world
Published: 2017/01/25
Channel: Fox Business
.@fordschool - Peter Navarro & Phil Potter: US-China Relations: Cooperation or Conflict?
.@fordschool - Peter Navarro & Phil Potter: US-China Relations: Cooperation or Conflict?
Published: 2012/09/28
Channel: Ford School
How This Trump Appointment Will Shake Up Trade w/China
How This Trump Appointment Will Shake Up Trade w/China
Published: 2016/12/23
Channel: The Big Picture RT
Peter Navarro Discusses Trump
Peter Navarro Discusses Trump's Economic Policies
Published: 2016/08/17
Channel: Papa Giorgio
RED SCARE: A look inside China with expert Peter Navarro
RED SCARE: A look inside China with expert Peter Navarro
Published: 2015/11/28
Channel: Josh Bernstein
Ian Bremmer: Peter Navarro A
Ian Bremmer: Peter Navarro A 'Credible' Choice For Trade Council | CNBC
Published: 2016/12/22
Channel: CNBC
The Coming China Wars: Where They will be Fought, How They can be Won
The Coming China Wars: Where They will be Fought, How They can be Won
Published: 2012/12/11
Channel: UCI Open
Peter Navarro and the Breakup of the EU
Peter Navarro and the Breakup of the EU
Published: 2017/02/02
Channel: Eazl
White House trade advisor Navarro on future trade deals
White House trade advisor Navarro on future trade deals
Published: 2017/03/31
Channel: Fox Business
Trump Picks Peter Navarro to Head New Trade Council
Trump Picks Peter Navarro to Head New Trade Council
Published: 2016/12/21
Channel: CitizenActionNow
Navarro Says Not All Trade Deficits Are Necessarily Bad
Navarro Says Not All Trade Deficits Are Necessarily Bad
Published: 2017/03/31
Channel: Bloomberg Politics
Trump appoints China critic Peter Navarro to new trade panel
Trump appoints China critic Peter Navarro to new trade panel
Published: 2016/12/25
Channel: CGTN
Trump nombra a Peter Navarro como consejero de Comercio
Trump nombra a Peter Navarro como consejero de Comercio
Published: 2016/12/23
Channel: CCTV Español
Euro is a Rigged Currency System, says Trump
Euro is a Rigged Currency System, says Trump
Published: 2017/02/02
Channel: Brent Goff Reports
Peter Navarro: ‘Hillary Clinton Has Got A Proven Record In Destroying Jobs’
Peter Navarro: ‘Hillary Clinton Has Got A Proven Record In Destroying Jobs’
Published: 2016/08/25
Channel: Western Journalism
STEVE QUAYLE & PETER NAVARRO (TRUNEWS RADIO 111015)
STEVE QUAYLE & PETER NAVARRO (TRUNEWS RADIO 111015)
Published: 2015/11/10
Channel: TRUNEWS
Trump Appoints Death By China Author Peter Navarro To Head Trade Office, Hints At Trade Wa
Trump Appoints Death By China Author Peter Navarro To Head Trade Office, Hints At Trade Wa
Published: 2016/12/27
Channel: Trump Breaking News Network
Peter Navarro - Death By Chinese Junk (Documentary Version)
Peter Navarro - Death By Chinese Junk (Documentary Version)
Published: 2015/03/28
Channel: Jack Wally
Crouching Tiger Episode 1:  Will There Be War With China?
Crouching Tiger Episode 1: Will There Be War With China?
Published: 2016/05/20
Channel: DeathByChina
Nicolas Doze VS Jean-Marc Daniel: Peter Navarro attaque l
Nicolas Doze VS Jean-Marc Daniel: Peter Navarro attaque l'Allemagne – 01/02
Published: 2017/02/01
Channel: BFMbusiness
Peter Navarro vs. Caruso-Cabrera
Peter Navarro vs. Caruso-Cabrera
Published: 2013/05/29
Channel: Andrew Roth
Trump Taps Author Peter Navarro for New Trade Post
Trump Taps Author Peter Navarro for New Trade Post
Published: 2016/12/23
Channel: VOA News
Trump economic advisor: Obama, Clinton economy is dying
Trump economic advisor: Obama, Clinton economy is dying
Published: 2016/10/19
Channel: Fox Business
Death by China (Peter Navarro and Greg Autry)
Death by China (Peter Navarro and Greg Autry)
Published: 2011/08/22
Channel: toiaccongsanvn
Gasparino: Peter Navarro could be Trump’s CEA chairman
Gasparino: Peter Navarro could be Trump’s CEA chairman
Published: 2016/12/20
Channel: Fox Business
US Trade Deficit & India
US Trade Deficit & India
Published: 2017/03/07
Channel: CNBC-TV18
Trump picks China hawk Peter Navarro for new trade post
Trump picks China hawk Peter Navarro for new trade post
Published: 2016/12/22
Channel: Donald Trump News
Peter Navarro Sophomore Highlights 2015
Peter Navarro Sophomore Highlights 2015
Published: 2015/10/20
Channel: Peter Navarro
Chết dưới tay Trung Cộng (Death-By-China) By Peter-Navarro
Chết dưới tay Trung Cộng (Death-By-China) By Peter-Navarro
Published: 2016/12/28
Channel: Tien Tran
SPC Peter Navarro, US Army
SPC Peter Navarro, US Army
Published: 2013/02/07
Channel: Rowena Navarro
Donald Trump Appoints Peter Navarro, The Head of White House National Trade Council | TV5 News
Donald Trump Appoints Peter Navarro, The Head of White House National Trade Council | TV5 News
Published: 2016/12/24
Channel: TV5 News
Peter Navarro & Wilbur Ross丨環球聚焦 環球東方
Peter Navarro & Wilbur Ross丨環球聚焦 環球東方
Published: 2017/01/06
Channel: 環球東方
Trump bổ nhiệm Peter Navarro, tác giả sách "Death by China" nắm CT Hội Đồng Thương Mại Quốc Gia.
Trump bổ nhiệm Peter Navarro, tác giả sách "Death by China" nắm CT Hội Đồng Thương Mại Quốc Gia.
Published: 2017/01/06
Channel: Hội Nghị Diên Hồng.
PETER NAVARRO:  "FED CHAIRMAN IS A PROFESSIONAL LIAR" 8-9-2010
PETER NAVARRO: "FED CHAIRMAN IS A PROFESSIONAL LIAR" 8-9-2010
Published: 2010/08/10
Channel: NEWZZCAFE
Jeremiah Farmer Interviews Trump Policy Advisor, Peter Navarro
Jeremiah Farmer Interviews Trump Policy Advisor, Peter Navarro
Published: 2016/10/28
Channel: Jeremiah Farmer
Peter Navarro: Trump Will Clean Up Trade Deals
Peter Navarro: Trump Will Clean Up Trade Deals
Published: 2016/11/04
Channel: Financial Issues with Dan Celia
Crouching TIger Episode Three: The Wild Card of North Korea
Crouching TIger Episode Three: The Wild Card of North Korea
Published: 2016/06/10
Channel: Peter Navarro
Financial Management Network - Peter Navarro
Financial Management Network - Peter Navarro
Published: 2007/09/20
Channel: SmartPros
Peter Navarro: Trump Will Unleash The Energy Sector
Peter Navarro: Trump Will Unleash The Energy Sector
Published: 2016/11/04
Channel: Financial Issues with Dan Celia
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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Peter Navarro
White House National Trade Council Director Peter Navarro in Orval Office in January 2017.jpg
Peter Navarro in the White House Oval Office in January 2017
Director of the National Trade Council
Assumed office
January 20, 2017
President Donald Trump
Preceded by Position established
Personal details
Born (1949-07-15) July 15, 1949 (age 68)
Political party Democratic
Education Tufts University (BA)
Harvard University (MPA, PhD)

Peter Navarro (born July 15, 1949) is an American economist who currently serves as the Assistant to the President, Director of Trade and Industrial Policy, and the Director of the White House National Trade Council, a newly created entity in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government.[1] A former professor of economics and public policy at the Paul Merage School of Business, University of California, Irvine, Navarro is the author of over a dozen books, including Death by China.

Navarro is known as a staunch critic of China and strong proponent of reducing U.S. trade deficits. He has accused Germany and China of currency manipulation. He has called for increasing the size of the American manufacturing sector, setting high tariffs, and repatriating global supply chains. He is a strong opponent of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. His views on trade are widely considered fringe and misguided by other economists.

Early life and education[edit]

Navarro's father, a saxophonist and clarinetist, led a house band, which played summers in New Hampshire and winters in Florida.[2] His parents divorced when he was 9 or 10.[2] Subsequently, he lived with his mother, a Saks Fifth Avenue secretary, in Palm Beach, Florida.[2] He lived in Bethesda, Maryland, during his teenage years.[2]

Navarro graduated from Tufts University in 1972 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. He earned a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government in 1979, and a PhD in Economics from Harvard in 1986.[3] Shortly after graduation from Tufts, Navarro spent three years in the U.S. Peace Corps, serving in Thailand.[3]

Career[edit]

Policy analysis[edit]

In the 1970s, Navarro served as a policy analyst for the Urban Services Group, the Massachusetts Energy Office, and the United States Department of Energy.[3]

Professor Peter Navarro talks his work "Death by China" and how China cheats in the world trade system at University of Michigan in 2012

Navarro's work has appeared in Barron’s, Bloomberg Businessweek, Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, the Chicago Tribune, the International Herald Tribune, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review and The Journal of Business.[4] He has appeared on Bloomberg TV and radio, BBC, CNN, NPR, and Marketplace. He is a contributor to CNBC and has appeared on 60 Minutes.[4] He also writes investment articles for thestreet.com.[5] In 2012, Navarro directed and produced a documentary film based on his book, Death by China.[6] The film was released under the same title and narrated by Martin Sheen.

Navarro's policy prescriptions include that “U.S. should be tough on trade, crack down on intellectual property theft, tax Chinese exports, combat Chinese mercantilism, [and] bring jobs home.”[7]

Academics[edit]

A professor of economics and public policy at University of California, Irvine for over 20 years, Navarro has worked on energy issues and the relationship between the United States and Asia.[8] He has received multiple teaching awards for MBA courses he has taught.[9] Before joining the UC Irvine faculty, Navarro worked as a research associate in Harvard University's Energy and Environmental Policy Center from 1981 to 1985.

As a doctoral student in 1984 Nararro wrote a book titled, "The Policy Game: How Special Interests and Ideologues are Stealing America," which discussed that special interest groups had led the United States to “a point in its history where it cannot grow and prosper.” In the book he also called for greater worker's compensation by those that had lost jobs to trade and foreign competition. His doctoral thesis on why corporations donate to charity is one of his highest cited works. He has also done research in the topic of wind energy with Frank Harris, a former student of his.[10]

He then lectured at the University of California, San Diego, where he also served as an assistant professor, teaching courses in business and government.[3] Prior to teaching, Navarro worked in Washington, D.C. as an energy and environmental policy analyst.[11] Navarro has published peer-reviewed economics research on energy policy, charity, deregulation and the economics of trash collection.[7][12][13] According to the Economist, Navarro "is a prolific writer, but has no publications in top-tier academic journals."[14]

Politics[edit]

Navarro ran for office in San Diego, California three times as a Democrat. In 1992, he ran for mayor as an Independent, finishing first (38.2%) in the all-party primary, but losing (48.0%) to Republican Susan Golding in the runoff.[15] In 1996, he ran for the 49th Congressional District as the Democratic Party nominee (41.9%), but lost to Republican Brian Bilbray (52.7%).[16] In 2001, Navarro ran in a special election to fill the District 6 San Diego city council seat, but lost in the primary.[17]

President Trump's chief trade advisor[edit]

Director Peter Navarro addresses President Donald Trump's promises to American people, workers, and domestic manufacturers (Declaring American Economic Independence on 6/28/2016) in the Oval Office with Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross before President Trump signs Executive Orders regarding trade in March 2017[18][19]

In 2016, Navarro served as a policy advisor to the Donald Trump presidential campaign.[1] Navarro and the international private equity investor Wilbur Ross authored an economic plan for the Donald Trump presidential campaign in September 2016.[20] Navarro was invited to be an adviser after Jared Kushner saw on Amazon that he co-wrote Death by China, while he was researching China for Trump.[21] and told When the Tax Policy Center assessed that Trump's economic plan would reduce federal revenues by $6 trillion and reduce economic growth in the long term, Navarro said that the analysis demonstrated "a high degree of analytical and political malfeasance".[22] When the Peterson Institute for International Affairs estimated that Trump's economic plan would cost millions of American their jobs, Navarro said that the Peterson Institute "weave a false narrative and they come up with some phony numbers."[23] According to MIT economist Simon Johnson, the economic plan authored by Navarro and Wilbur Ross for Donald Trump during the campaign had projections "based on assumptions so unrealistic that they seem to have come from a different planet. If the United States really did adopt Trump’s plan, the result would be an immediate and unmitigated disaster."[24] When 370 economists, including nineteen Nobel laureates, signed a letter warning against Donald Trump's stated economic policies in November 2016, Navarro said that the letter was “an embarrassment to the corporate offshoring wing of the economist profession who continues to insist bad trade deals are good for America.”[25][26]

In October 2016, with Wilbur Ross and Andy Puzder, Navarro coauthored the "ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF DONALD TRUMP’S CONTRACT WITH THE AMERICAN VOTER".[27]

On December 21, 2016, Navarro was selected by President-elect Donald Trump to head a newly created position, as director of the White House National Trade Council.[28] He outlines President Trump's trade policy as aiming to create jobs, revive the manufacturing sector, and improve the country's trade balance. He warned that trade deficits could jeopardize U.S. national security by allowing unfriendly nations to encroach on American supply chains. One of his main missions is to focus on behaviors by other countries that considers abusive, cheating, illegal, and unfair against the U.S.[29][30][31]

Views on trade[edit]

Navarro has been a staunch critic of trade with China and strong proponent of reducing U.S. trade deficits. He has attacked Germany, Japan and China for currency manipulation. He has called for increasing the size of the American manufacturing sector, setting high tariffs, and repatriating global supply chains. He was a fierce opponent of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

According to Politico, Navarro's economic theories are "considered fringe" by his fellow economists.[32] Al-Jazeera notes that "few other economists have endorsed Navarro's ideas."[33] A New Yorker reporter described Navarro's views on trade and China as so radical "that, even with his assistance, I was unable to find another economist who fully agrees with them."[34] The Economist described Navarro as having "oddball views".[35] The George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen has praised him as “one of the most versatile and productive American economists of the last few decades”, but Cowen noted that he disagreed with his views on trade, which he claimed go "against a strong professional consensus."[32] University of Michigan economist Justin Wolfers described Navarro's views as "far outside the mainstream," noting that "he endorses few of the key tenets of" the economics profession.[36] According to Lee Branstetter, economics professor at Carnegie Mellon and trade expert with the Peterson Institute for International Economics, Navarro "was never a part of the group of economists who ever studied the global free-trade system ... He doesn't publish in journals. What he's writing and saying right now has nothing to do with what he got his Harvard Ph.D. in ... he doesn't do research that would meet the scientific standards of that community."[37] Marcus Noland, an economist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, described a tax and trade paper written by Navarro and Wilbur Ross for Trump as "a complete misunderstanding of international trade, on their part."[22]

Border adjustment tax[edit]

Navarro supports a tax policy called "border adjustment", which essentially taxes all imports.[37] In response to criticism that the border adjustment tax could hurt U.S. companies and put jobs at risk, Navarro called it "fake news."[37]

China[edit]

According to Politico, "Navarro is perhaps the most extreme advocate in Washington, and maybe in all of economics, for an aggressive stance toward China."[32] Navarro put his attention to China in the mid-2000s.[38] His first publication on the subject is the 2006 book The Coming China Wars: Where They Will Be Fought, How They Can Be Won.[39] Navarro has said that he started to examine China when he noticed that his former students were losing jobs, concluding that China was at fault.[38]

In Politico's description of the book, "Navarro uses military language to refer to China’s trade policies, referring to its “conquest” of the world’s export markets, which has “vaporized literally millions of manufacturing jobs and driven down wages.”... China’s aspirations are so insatiable, he claims, that eventually there will be a clash over “our most basic of all needs—bread, water, and air.”"[39] Navarro has described the entry of China to the World Trade Organization as one of the United States' biggest mistakes.[38] To respond to the Chinese threat, Navarro has advocated for 43% tariffs, the repudiation of trade pacts, major increases in military expenditures and strengthened military ties with Taiwan.[39][38] The New York Times notes that "a wide range of economists have warned that curtailing trade with China would damage the American economy, forcing consumers to pay higher prices for goods and services."[40] Navarro has reportedly also encouraged President Trump to enact a 25-percent tariff on Chinese steel imports, something that "trade experts worry... would upend global trade practices and cause countries to retaliate, potentially leading to a trade war".[41]

Navarro has said that a large part of China's competitive advantage over the United States stems from unfair trade practices.[14] Navarro has criticized China for pollution, poor labor standards, government subsidies, producing "contaminated, defective and cancerous" exports, currency manipulation, and theft of US intellectual property.[14][33][42] In his 2012 documentary, Navarro said that China caused the loss of 57,000 US factories and 25 million jobs.[33] While Navarro maintains that China manipulates its currency, neither the U.S. Treasury nor most economists believe that it is the case.[37][38]

According to Foreign Policy, "well-regarded China analysts are almost universal in their derision of [Navarro's] views."[38] Of the more than dozen China specialists contacted by Foreign Policy, most either did not know of him or only interacted with him briefly.[38] Kenneth Pomeranz, University of Chicago professor of Chinese History, said that his "recollection is that [Navarro] generally avoided people who actually knew something about the country".[38] Columnist Gordon G. Chang was the only China watcher contacted by Foreign Policy who defended Navarro, but even then noted that he disagreed with Navarro's claims of currency manipulation, opposition to the TPP and calls for high tariffs.[38] Navarro does not appear to speak Chinese nor has he spent any time in the country.[38] James McGregor, a former chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in China, said that Navarro's books and documentary on China “have close to zero credibility with people who know the country,” and are filled with “hyperbole, inaccuracies” and a “cartoonish caricature of China that he puts out.”[38]

Germany[edit]

Navarro drew controversy when he accused Germany of using a “grossly undervalued” euro to “exploit” the US and its EU partners.[43] Politico notes that Germany does not set the value of the euro.[39] Economists and commentators are divided on the accuracy of Navarro's remarks.[44][45] Paul Krugman said that Navarro was right and wrong at the same time: "Yes, Germany in effect has an undervalued currency relative to what it would have without the euro... But does this mean that the euro as a whole is undervalued against the dollar? Probably not."[46] Boston University economist Laurence Kotlikoff described Navarro's accusation of Germany as a currency manipulator as "#stupideconomics".[47]

Manufacturing[edit]

Navarro argues that the decline in US manufacturing jobs is chiefly due to "unfair trade practices and bad trade deals. And if you don't believe that, just go to the booming factories in Germany, in Japan, in Korea, in China, in Malaysia, in Vietnam, in Indonesia, in Italy — every place that we're running deficits with."[48] However, many economists attribute the decline in manufacturing jobs chiefly to automation and other innovations that allow manufacturing firms to produce more goods with fewer workers, rather than trade.[48][49]

Navarro has been a proponent of strengthening the manufacturing sector's role in the national economy: "We envision a more Germany-style economy, where 20 percent of our workforce is in manufacturing... And we're not talking about banging tin in the back room."[37] The New York Times notes that "experts on manufacturing... doubt that the government can significantly increase factory employment, noting that mechanization is the major reason fewer people are working in factories.."[40]

NAFTA[edit]

Navarro has called for the United States to leave NAFTA.[41] Politico reported that Navarro tried to convince President Trump of leaving NAFTA.[41]

Repatriation of global supply chains[edit]

Navarro has called for repatriating global supply chains.[39][42] According to Politico's Jacob Heilbrunn, such a move "would be enormously costly and take years to execute".[39]

Trade as a national security risk[edit]

Navarro has framed trade as a national security risk.[39][50][51] According to Politico, "he’s a hard-line mercantilist who insists that military confrontation with some trading partners is almost inevitable."[39]

Navarro has characterized foreign purchases of U.S. companies as a threat to national security, but according to NPR, this is "a fringe view that puts him at odds with the vast majority of economists."[52] Dartmouth economist Douglas Irwin noted that the US government already reviews foreign purchases of companies with military or strategic value, and has on occasion rejected such deals.[52] Irwin said that Navarro had not substantiated his claim with any evidence.[52]

Navarro has also said that the United States has "already begun to lose control of [its] food supply chain", which according to NPR, "sounded pretty off-the-wall to a number of economists" who noted that the US is a massive exporter of food.[52] Dermot Hayes, an agribusiness economist at Iowa State University, described Navarro's statement as "uninformed".[52]

Trade deficits[edit]

Navarro is a proponent of the notion that trade deficits are bad in and of themselves, a view which is widely rejected by trade experts and economists across the political spectrum.[53][54][55][56][57][58][59][60][61][62][2][excessive citations] In a white paper co-authored with Wilbur Ross, Navarro stated, "when a country runs a trade deficit by importing more than it exports, this subtracts from growth."[58][63] In a Wall Street Journal op-ed defending his views, Navarro stated, "If we are able to reduce our trade deficits through tough, smart negotiations, we should be able to increase our growth."[64] Harvard University economics professor Gregory Mankiw has said that Navarro's views on the trade deficit are based on the kind of mistakes that "even a freshman at the end of ec 10 knows."[65][66] Tufts University professor Daniel W. Drezner said about Navarro's op-ed, "as someone who’s written on this topic I could not for the life of me understand his reasoning".[50] According to Tyler Cowen, "close to no one" in the economics profession agrees with Navarro’s idea that a trade deficit is bad in and of itself.[57] Nobel laureate Angus Deaton described Navarro's attitude on trade deficits as “an old-fashioned mercantilist position.”[62]

The Economist magazine has described Navarro's views on the trade deficit as "dodgy economics" and "fantasy",[14] while the Financial Times has described them as "poor economics".[67] Economists Noah Smith,[68] Scott Sumner,[69][70] Olivier Blanchard,[42] and Phil Levy[71] have also criticized Navarro's views on the trade deficit.

Trans-Pacific Partnership[edit]

Navarro opposes the Trans-Pacific Partnership.[72] In an April 2015 op-ed, Navarro said, "To woo us, their spinmeisters boast the TPP will spur American exports to stimulate sorely needed economic growth. In truth, the American economy will suffer severely. This is because the TPP will hammer two main drivers of economic growth – domestic investment and “net exports.”"[72] Navarro said in March 2017 that TPP "would have been a “death knell” to America’s auto and vehicle parts industry that we “urgently need to bring back to full life.”[42] Politico's Jacob Heilbrunn and the Economist argue that there may be a disconnect between Navarro's policy on China and his opposition to the TPP, as scuttling the TPP will strengthen China's hand.[39][14]

Personal life[edit]

Navarro is married to architect Leslie Lebon.[73] They live in Laguna Beach, California.[74]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "President-Elect Trump Appoints Dr. Peter Navarro to Head the White House National Trade Council". GreatAgain. December 21, 2016. Retrieved January 19, 2017. President-elect Donald J. Trump today announced the formation of the White House National Trade Council (NTC) and his selection of Dr. Peter Navarro to serve as Assistant to the President and Director of Trade and Industrial Policy. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Trump’s Trade Warrior Is the Most Unpopular Economist in the Class". Bloomberg.com. 2017-05-02. Retrieved 2017-05-14. 
  3. ^ a b c d Navarro, Peter (August 2016). "Peter Navarro Curriculum Vitae" (PDF). UCI Paul Merage School of Business. University of California, Irvine. Retrieved January 6, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "Peter Navarro". The Paul Merage School of Business. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Articles by Peter Navarro". TheStreet. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 
  6. ^ Perkins, Olivera (September 7, 2012). "Economist Peter Navarro says U.S. manufacturing is suffering 'Death by China'". cleveland.com. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. Retrieved January 19, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b Cowen, Tyler (August 1, 2016). "Here's the Economist Whose Ideas Guide Trump". Bloomberg View. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  8. ^ Navarro, Peter. "Peter Navarro Bio". The Paul Merage School of Business. University of California, Irvine. Retrieved January 6, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Teaching Awards". The Paul Merage School of Business. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Peter Navarro is about to become one of the world’s most powerful economists". The Economist. January 21, 2017. ISSN 0013-0613. Retrieved January 28, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Peter Navarro". The Globalist. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Trump’s Economic Advisers Are Dealmakers Just Like Trump". Money. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  13. ^ Appelbaum, Binyamin (December 21, 2016). "Trump Taps Peter Navarro, Vocal Critic of China, for New Trade Post". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  14. ^ a b c d e "Peter Navarro is about to become one of the world’s most powerful economists". The Economist. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  15. ^ "Election Results – Mayor, City of San Diego" (PDF). City of San Diego. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 
  16. ^ "California's 49th Congressional District Elections". Ballotpedia. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Election History – Council District 6, City of San Diego" (PDF). City of San Diego. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 
  18. ^ Presidential Executive Order Regarding the Omnibus Report on Significant Trade Deficits, White House, 3/31/2016
  19. ^ Presidential Executive Order on Establishing Enhanced Collection and Enforcement of Antidumping and Countervailing Duties and Violations of Trade and Customs Laws, White House, 3/31/2016
  20. ^ "SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR DONALD TRUMP". www.donaldjtrump.com. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  21. ^ Vladimirov, Nikita (15 April 2017). "Report: Kushner found Trump advisor Navarro by browsing Amazon". TheHill. Retrieved 18 April 2017. 
  22. ^ a b "Trump’s advisers see another conspiracy — far from the campaign trail". Washington Post. Retrieved March 7, 2017. The researchers in question said there is no plot against the Trump team, just errors of analysis by Navarro and Ross... "There’s no conspiracy,” said Marcus Noland, executive vice president and director of studies at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, the think tank Navarro dubbed Vader-esque. “There is a complete misunderstanding of international trade, on their part." 
  23. ^ Rainey, Ryan (September 19, 2016). "Trump Adviser Bullish in Wake of Tax, Trade Critiques". Morning Consult. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  24. ^ Johnson, Simon (September 30, 2016). "Trump’s Magical Economic Thinking". Project Syndicate. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  25. ^ "Hundreds of US economists warn against voting Trump". The Times of Israel. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  26. ^ "Top economists pen anti-Trump letter, claim he ‘misled the electorate’ and promotes conspiracies". South China Morning Post. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  27. ^ Wilbur Ross, Andy Puzder & Peter Navarro, ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF DONALD TRUMP’S CONTRACT WITH THE AMERICAN VOTER, Donald J. Trump for President, Inc., 10/30/2016
  28. ^ "‘Death by China’ author to lead Trump trade office". www.ft.com. Financial Times. Retrieved January 19, 2017. 
  29. ^ Peter Navarro Outlines Trump Administration Trade Policy Priorities, C-SPAN, 3/6/2017
  30. ^ Navarro Says Trade Deficit Endangers National Security, Morning Consult, 3/7/2017
  31. ^ Peter Navarro Says Trade Deficits Aren't Always Bad, Bloomberg, 3/31/2017
  32. ^ a b c "Trump’s attack dog on trade". The Agenda. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Navarro is perhaps the most extreme advocate in Washington, and maybe in all of economics, for an aggressive stance toward China, America’s largest trading partner… a series of interviews with the 67-year-old’s former colleagues, campaign staffers and students reveal a character far more defined by his interest in the trench combat of politics and policy than in academic research… his colleagues painted a picture of a charismatic personality whose telegenic presence helped him launch a political career and later find an audience for economic theories that were considered fringe even by the confrontational standards of the field… One academic economist who wrote positively about Navarro was Tyler Cowen, an economist at George Mason University’s Mercatus Center, who lauded Navarro in a column for Bloomberg View last year as “one of the most versatile and productive American economists of the last few decades”—though he also, in the column, went on to disagree with many of Navarro’s major perspectives. I emailed him to ask what he thought specifically of Navarro’s trade views, and Cowen responded: “I think he is completely wrong on trade, and also against a strong professional consensus.”… Navarro himself has struggled in the past to produce a name of an economist who aligns with his worldview. The New Yorker asked him as much when it wrote its own profile last year, but both of the names Navarro offered fell through: Alan Tonelson, who frequently writes about trade on his blog, responded that he doesn’t “hold an economics degree,” while Peter Morici, an economist at the University of Maryland, noted Navarro’s “rather severe position.” “That zero-sum statement, I have a problem with that,” he told the magazine. “Where’s his proof?” 
  33. ^ a b c "Trump names anti-China economist as trade council chief". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  34. ^ "Trump’s Muse on U.S. Trade with China". The New Yorker. October 12, 2016. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Navarro’s views on trade and China are so radical, however, that, even with his assistance, I was unable to find another economist who fully agrees with them. 
  35. ^ "Cooking up an economic policy". The Economist. Retrieved 2017-05-14. 
  36. ^ Wolfers, Justin (January 11, 2017). "Why Most Economists Are So Worried About Trump". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 12, 2017. the only official who identifies as an economist — Peter Navarro, who earned a Harvard Ph.D. in economics and will head up the newly formed National Trade Council — stands so far outside the mainstream that he endorses few of the key tenets of the profession. 
  37. ^ a b c d e "The clearest articulation of what Trump wants to do to America's economy comes from one person". Business Insider. Retrieved March 12, 2017. The thing about Peter Navarro is that he was never a part of the group of economists who ever studied the global free-trade system," Branstetter said. "He doesn't publish in journals. What he's writing and saying right now has nothing to do with what he got his Harvard Ph.D. in ... he doesn't do research that would meet the scientific standards of that community. As far as I'm concerned he doesn't know what he's talking about in terms of trade policy. 
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Trump’s Top China Expert Isn’t a China Expert". Foreign Policy. Retrieved March 20, 2017. 
  39. ^ a b c d e f g h i "The Most Dangerous Man in Trump World?". POLITICO Magazine. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  40. ^ a b Appelbaum, Binyamin (December 21, 2016). "Trump Taps Peter Navarro, Vocal Critic of China, for New Trade Post". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  41. ^ a b c "Trump’s trade warrior prowls the West Wing". POLITICO. Retrieved 2017-07-17. 
  42. ^ a b c d "U.S. Will Reclaim Global Supply Chain, Trump Trade Aide Says". Bloomberg.com. March 6, 2017. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  43. ^ "Subscribe to read". www.ft.com. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  44. ^ "Is Germany a currency manipulator? | Bruegel". bruegel.org. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  45. ^ "Subscribe to read". www.ft.com. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  46. ^ "Germany, the Euro, and Currency Manipulation". Paul Krugman Blog. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  47. ^ Kotlikoff, Laurence. "The Latest #StupidEconomics -- Peter Navarro Calls Germany A 'Currency Manipulator'". Forbes. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  48. ^ a b "Peter Navarro: A 'Bricklayer' Of Trump's Protectionist Wall". NPR.org. Retrieved 2017-05-14. 
  49. ^ Long, Heather (2016-06-27). "Trump will grow the economy like Reagan, says adviser Peter Navarro". CNNMoney. Retrieved 2017-05-14. 
  50. ^ a b "Perspective | Why the Trump administration hates multilateral trade agreements the most". Washington Post. Retrieved March 9, 2017. Peter Navarro, the director of Trump’s National Trade Council, published a Wall Street Journal op-ed that seemed to argue that trade deficits were bad for national security reasons. I say “seemed to” because as someone who’s written on this topic I could not for the life of me understand his reasoning. 
  51. ^ Timiraos, Nick (March 6, 2017). "Trump Adviser Peter Navarro: Trade Deficits Endanger U.S. National Security". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  52. ^ a b c d e "Trump Adviser's Warning About Food Supply Takeover Met With Skepticism". NPR.org. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Peter Navarro says foreign companies buying up U.S. corporations are posing a threat to national security. That might sound bad, but it's a fringe view that puts him at odds with the vast majority of economists… Here is what Navarro says he's worried about. The U.S. imports more than it sells to the rest of the world. That trade deficit means some of our trading partners end up with a lot of cash. And they use some of it to invest in the U.S. They buy U.S. Treasuries, stocks, real estate. And sometimes they buy up U.S. companies. Most economists see this as just part of global trade, which overall benefits all the countries involved…. And then Navarro said, "We have already begun to lose control of our food supply chain." That statement in particular sounded pretty off-the-wall to a number of economists. Is the U.S. really losing control of its food supply? "I was completely confused by that comment," says Dermot Hayes, an agribusiness economist at Iowa State University. "It's an uninformed statement." "There's nothing that's going on that would say that other governments are buying essential portions of our agricultural infrastructure," he adds… So Hayes says Navarro just isn't making any sense. Hayes says the reality is the exact opposite: The U.S. is a massive exporter of food. So China, Japan, Mexico and lots of other countries rely on the U.S. for their food supply… All this is not to say that foreign ownership of companies never creates a national security problem. Douglas Irwin, a Dartmouth College trade economist, says that economists already recognize that national security considerations should override any adherence to free trade. "Adam Smith in The Wealth of Nations going way back said defense is more important than opulence, so economists have always recognized that," Irwin says. But Irwin says the government already reviews foreign purchases of companies with military or strategic technology or significance — and it sometimes blocks those deals. He says Navarro just didn't provide convincing evidence that there's actually anything to worry about here. 
  53. ^ Gramer, Robbie (March 6, 2017). "Economists Take Aim at Trump Trade Theory — Again". Foreign Policy. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Navarro’s comments drew skepticism from trade experts and economists across the political spectrum, who said that line of thinking on economics was flawed. Economists say trade deficits aren’t an indication of good or bad economic times, but rather a function of savings and investments. (The United States enjoyed a stellar trade surplus during the Great Depression in the 1930s, for example.) “He won’t find economists — either on the left or the right — that believe trade deficits are this huge a problem,” Chip Roh, a former assistant U.S. trade representative and trade lawyer, told Foreign Policy. “It doesn’t make economic sense.” “When economists hear, ‘Our goal is reduce the trade deficit,’ it baffles us,” Gordon Hanson, a trade economist at the University of California, San Diego, told FP. “He’s either using it as a cheap political ploy or there’s a misconception — he doesn’t understand how it operates.” 
  54. ^ Timiraos, Nick (March 6, 2017). "Trump Adviser Peter Navarro: Trade Deficits Endanger U.S. National Security". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  55. ^ "Trump mixes facts, falsehoods to rip Clinton on the economy". POLITICO. Retrieved March 7, 2017. Peter Navarro, a professor of business at UC Irvine and a member of the all-male team of economic advisers Trump rolled out last week, argued that renegotiating trade deals that don’t increase the country’s GDP growth rate and decrease the deficit will keep him busy — and eventually generate “trillions in additional tax revenues over time” to fund investments in infrastructure and entitlements.... Many economists, however, don’t believe eliminating the trade deficit will be enough to spur the economy out of the low growth mode the U.S. and the global economy more broadly have been stuck in for more than a decade. 
  56. ^ "Trade hawks to rule the roost in Trump’s White House". www.ft.com. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Once viewed as fringe thinking from a strident economic nationalist, Mr Navarro’s oeuvre is drawing urgent new scrutiny... Mr Navarro co-authored a much-scrutinised white paper in September that helped flesh out the Republican candidate’s economic policy. It put reducing the trade deficit and fighting back against “cheating” by US trading partners such as China at the core, arguing that US workers had for too long suffered from what it viewed as bad trade policy. Mainstream economists regard targeting the trade deficit as a misguided approach. 
  57. ^ a b "What You Should Know About the Professor Who Has Trump’s Ear on the Economy". The Chronicle of Higher Education. December 7, 2016. Retrieved March 12, 2017. In an interview with The Chronicle this week, Mr. Cowen said Mr. Navarro’s broad protectionist ideas — like Mr. Trump, he urges slapping huge tariffs on Chinese goods to reduce the trade deficit — are out of step with generally accepted economic theories. "There are plenty of economists who defend some form of protectionism," said Mr. Cowen, to help a growing economy or to bolster selective industries. But "close to no one," he said, agrees with Mr. Navarro’s idea that a trade deficit is bad on its face. ... according to Mr. Glazer, a professor in the economics department who has had reason to assess Mr. Navarro’s publications, his work from the past 10 years lacks a lot of the "rigorous analysis of data with statistics" that a top-ranked economics journal requires. 
  58. ^ a b "Donald Trump’s trade team has based their analysis on a remarkably silly mistake". Vox. December 21, 2016. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  59. ^ "Meet Mr. ‘Death by China,’ Trump’s inside man on trade". Washington Post. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Navarro and Ross say that getting rid of the trade deficit and boosting investment would also spur faster economic growth, which would bring in $1.74 trillion in tax revenue over a decade. Hooey, say economists across the political spectrum. (Navarro declined to answer questions in emails or respond to phone calls.) N. Gregory Mankiw, chairman of President George W. Bush’s Council of Economic Advisers and a Harvard University economics professor, said in a September blog post that Navarro and Ross’s paper makes elementary mistakes by overstating growth and not understanding that a smaller trade deficit means lower investment along with possibly higher interest rates and less consumption. “Even a freshman at the end of ec 10 knows that trade deficits go hand in hand with capital inflows,” Mankiw wrote. 
  60. ^ RUGABER, PAUL WISEMAN and CHRISTOPHER S. "White House trade adviser: Deficit undermines US security". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Navarro's views on the trade deficit stand in stark contrast with mainstream economists, a difference he seemed to relish in his remarks. 
  61. ^ "White House civil war breaks out over trade". www.ft.com. Retrieved March 12, 2017. Mr Cohn and others have seized on Mr Navarro’s public comments — and widespread criticism by economists of his stand on trade deficits and other matters — to try and sideline him. 
  62. ^ a b "Analysis | Trump rails against trade deficit, but economists say there’s no easy way for him to make it go away". Washington Post. Retrieved March 12, 2017. At a conference Monday morning in Washington, Peter Navarro, the director of Trump’s National Trade Council, reiterated the administration’s focus on the trade deficit. The Trump administration policy is one of “free and fair and truly reciprocal trade that begins and ends with the belief that bilateral trade deficits do indeed matter,” he said. “Trade deficits not only matter when it comes to jobs and growth and national security, they matter a great deal,” Navarro said. Many economists disagree with this claim, saying that the factors behind the trade balance can be complex — and that the trade deficit is far from the best economic metric for policymakers to target... In an interview Monday, Angus Deaton, who won the Nobel Prize for economics in 2015, called the administration’s attitude on trade deficits “an old-fashioned mercantilist position.” “If you stand on a platform, it makes you six inches taller,” he said. “It’s a ridiculous argument.” 
  63. ^ "Navarro's Trade Views 'Misguided', 'Dangerous'". Cato Institute. December 23, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  64. ^ Navarro, Peter (March 5, 2017). "Why the White House Worries About Trade Deficits". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  65. ^ "Greg Mankiw's Blog: Trumponomics". gregmankiw.blogspot.com. Retrieved February 17, 2017. 
  66. ^ "Meet Mr. ‘Death by China,’ Trump’s inside man on trade". Washington Post. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  67. ^ "Subscribe to read". www.ft.com. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  68. ^ Smith, Noah (December 28, 2016). "Trump's Trade Chief Makes a Rookie Mistake". Bloomberg View. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  69. ^ "Donald Trump’s trade team has based their analysis on a remarkably silly mistake". Vox. December 21, 2016. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  70. ^ "Must-Read: Scott Sumner: Who Is Peter Navarro? | Equitable Growth". Equitable Growth. Retrieved March 7, 2017. 
  71. ^ Levy, Phil. "White House Whiffs On Trade Deficit Defense". Forbes. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  72. ^ a b Picard, Joe (April 13, 2015). "Parsing the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement". TheHill. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 
  73. ^ lebonarchitects.com/about_us
  74. ^ Flaherty, Somer (October 12, 2012). "Architects at Home". Laguna Beach Magazine. Retrieved October 17, 2013. 
  75. ^ "Peter Navarro – Books". ISBN Search. Retrieved August 26, 2016. 

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