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Wordpress Tricks and Tips: What is a Pingback on Wordpress?
Wordpress Tricks and Tips: What is a Pingback on Wordpress?
Published: 2015/04/21
Channel: *Owen Video
How to create a pingback on your WordPress blog.
How to create a pingback on your WordPress blog.
Published: 2016/01/23
Channel: Hugh W. Roberts
What Are Pingbacks and Trackbacks? [WordPress Tutorial]
What Are Pingbacks and Trackbacks? [WordPress Tutorial]
Published: 2010/07/30
Channel: WebTrainingWheels
Live DDOS attack, Wordpress Pingback attack and how to mitigate
Live DDOS attack, Wordpress Pingback attack and how to mitigate
Published: 2017/01/13
Channel: DumbTutorials
xmlrpc pingback attack
xmlrpc pingback attack
Published: 2017/04/28
Channel: Hacking Enjoyment
WP Pingback
WP Pingback
Published: 2016/12/29
Channel: Martin Sugar
O Que é Pingback? [ESTRATÉGIA PARA GANHAR POSIÇÕES NO GOOGLE]
O Que é Pingback? [ESTRATÉGIA PARA GANHAR POSIÇÕES NO GOOGLE]
Published: 2016/02/12
Channel: Brendon Quintanilha
Top Scientist: "People perish for the lack of this hidden knowledge..." - Law Of Attraction
Top Scientist: "People perish for the lack of this hidden knowledge..." - Law Of Attraction
Published: 2013/05/14
Channel: YouAreCreators
Pingback
Pingback
Published: 2017/06/20
Channel: mariela flores
Visar mitt pingback
Visar mitt pingback
Published: 2017/04/24
Channel: Tboy cool
Paymentwall PingBack Test
Paymentwall PingBack Test
Published: 2014/07/22
Channel: Rival Online
WordPress - Understanding Trackbacks and Pingbacks
WordPress - Understanding Trackbacks and Pingbacks
Published: 2014/03/17
Channel: Miszkoxxx
Curso de Wordpress (7) | Los comentarios, pingbacks y trackbacks en WordPress
Curso de Wordpress (7) | Los comentarios, pingbacks y trackbacks en WordPress
Published: 2013/12/01
Channel: Apple 5x1
What does pingback mean?
What does pingback mean?
Published: 2015/07/09
Channel: What Does That Mean?
014-pingback-comment
014-pingback-comment
Published: 2010/02/07
Channel: rjovica
XMLRPC PingBack exploit
XMLRPC PingBack exploit
Published: 2016/11/18
Channel: Abdelfattah Ibrahim
Paymentwall chargeback pingback
Paymentwall chargeback pingback
Published: 2015/12/31
Channel: Ahmed Rageh
WordPress-Bistro Webinar: "Pingbacks, Trackbacks und Spam"
WordPress-Bistro Webinar: "Pingbacks, Trackbacks und Spam"
Published: 2013/12/07
Channel: Michaela Steidl
Razvy, zis si jmecherul [PINGBACK]
Razvy, zis si jmecherul [PINGBACK]
Published: 2014/02/17
Channel: JaLeTe
ESET - Brute Force Amplification Attacks or XML RPC Pingback Vulnerability
ESET - Brute Force Amplification Attacks or XML RPC Pingback Vulnerability
Published: 2016/11/08
Channel: Hacker Tamizhan
The Pingback Podcast 1 Parte 1
The Pingback Podcast 1 Parte 1
Published: 2011/11/16
Channel: ThePingBack
UBER  - Brute Force Amplification Attacks or XML RPC Pingback Vulnerability
UBER - Brute Force Amplification Attacks or XML RPC Pingback Vulnerability
Published: 2016/11/08
Channel: Hacker Tamizhan
Pingback Power - CSV Export Import
Pingback Power - CSV Export Import
Published: 2011/03/04
Channel: dbpmarketing
Wordpress Trackback/Pingback Extractor Plugin
Wordpress Trackback/Pingback Extractor Plugin
Published: 2011/09/09
Channel: TheAffiliateSEO
Pingback DDoS
Pingback DDoS
Published: 2014/12/06
Channel: Freedom UA
How to Easily stop Wordpress self pingbacks, trackbacks and comment spam
How to Easily stop Wordpress self pingbacks, trackbacks and comment spam
Published: 2012/05/01
Channel: Chris Moe
8 New Backlinks in 8 Minutes with Pingback Pro
8 New Backlinks in 8 Minutes with Pingback Pro
Published: 2011/05/02
Channel: PingbackPro
atlassolutions.com XMLRPC Brute Force Amplification Attacks or XML RPC Pingback Vulnerability
atlassolutions.com XMLRPC Brute Force Amplification Attacks or XML RPC Pingback Vulnerability
Published: 2017/03/09
Channel: Muhammad Khizer Javed
WordPress Pingbacks
WordPress Pingbacks
Published: 2013/10/29
Channel: Bradley Corbett
014-copy-and-add-pingback-link
014-copy-and-add-pingback-link
Published: 2010/02/07
Channel: rjovica
Market Samurai: How The Pingback Strategy Works
Market Samurai: How The Pingback Strategy Works
Published: 2013/11/03
Channel: Dave Approved
Remote Denial of Service Exploit (xml-rpc Pingback API)
Remote Denial of Service Exploit (xml-rpc Pingback API)
Published: 2013/01/05
Channel: D35m0nd142
How to Disable Self Pingbacks in WordPress
How to Disable Self Pingbacks in WordPress
Published: 2015/08/11
Channel: WPBeginner - WordPress Tutorials
Pepa Pingback juegos de lluvia
Pepa Pingback juegos de lluvia
Published: 2017/07/28
Channel: Rosmery Reyesvv
How to Disable Trackbacks and Pingback in wordpress
How to Disable Trackbacks and Pingback in wordpress
Published: 2012/08/19
Channel: helpinwordpress
Pingback Optimizer
Pingback Optimizer
Published: 2011/08/24
Channel: wsokings
indeed Pingback DNS: Forwarded leads to Open Redirection
indeed Pingback DNS: Forwarded leads to Open Redirection
Published: 2017/09/07
Channel: Emad Shanab
Pingback Optimizer Installation Video
Pingback Optimizer Installation Video
Published: 2011/07/31
Channel: kingwarriorforum
Free SEO Tutorial by WordPress Expert - Trackbacks and Pingbacks in WordPress
Free SEO Tutorial by WordPress Expert - Trackbacks and Pingbacks in WordPress
Published: 2012/03/13
Channel: inntaonlinesolutions
021-trackback-and-pingback-on-post.avi
021-trackback-and-pingback-on-post.avi
Published: 2010/01/09
Channel: rjovica
The Pingback Podcast 1 Parte 2
The Pingback Podcast 1 Parte 2
Published: 2011/11/16
Channel: ThePingBack
Philosophy | Stone Circle Ubuntu Village | South Africa
Philosophy | Stone Circle Ubuntu Village | South Africa
Published: 2014/03/26
Channel: Michael Tellinger
The History of Odious Debt
The History of Odious Debt
Published: 2014/12/02
Channel: argusfest
MMT-MCT Fields Institute Seminar: Michael Hudson
MMT-MCT Fields Institute Seminar: Michael Hudson
Published: 2012/07/09
Channel: ProfSteveKeen
Pingback explainer
Pingback explainer
Published: 2014/03/28
Channel: Pingback.co
Free to Choose Part 3: Anatomy of a Crisis (Featuring Milton Friedman)
Free to Choose Part 3: Anatomy of a Crisis (Featuring Milton Friedman)
Published: 2010/12/21
Channel: Common Sense Capitalism
Pingback Optimizer Configure Your Plugin
Pingback Optimizer Configure Your Plugin
Published: 2011/07/31
Channel: kingwarriorforum
Pingback Optimizer
Pingback Optimizer
Published: 2015/07/09
Channel: Khanh Phuong
Boost your search engine rankings by using the Pingback Optimizer!
Boost your search engine rankings by using the Pingback Optimizer!
Published: 2010/10/05
Channel: oct02102010
Pingback Optimizer
Pingback Optimizer
Published: 2016/05/28
Channel: Darkside Channel
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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A pingback is one of four types of linkback methods for Web authors to request notification when somebody links to one of their documents. This enables authors to keep track of who is linking to, or referring to their articles. Some weblog software and content management systems, such as WordPress, Movable Type, Serendipity, and Telligent Community, support automatic pingbacks where all the links in a published article can be pinged when the article is published. Other content management systems, such as Drupal and Joomla, support pingbacks through the use of addons or extensions.

Essentially, a pingback is an XML-RPC request (not to be confused with an ICMP ping) sent from Site A to Site B, when an author of the blog at Site A writes a post that links to Site B. The request includes the URI of the linking page. When Site B receives the notification signal, it automatically goes back to Site A checking for the existence of a live incoming link. If that link exists, the pingback is recorded successfully. This makes pingbacks less prone to spam than trackbacks. Pingback-enabled resources must either use an X-Pingback header or contain a <link> element to the XML-RPC script.

Exploits[edit]

In March 2014, Akamai published a report about a widely seen exploit involving Pingback that targets vulnerable WordPress sites.[1] This exploit led to massive abuse of legitimate blogs and websites and turned them into unwilling participants in a DDoS attack.[2] Details about this vulnerability have been publicized since 2012.[3]

The pingback attacks consist of "reflection" and "amplification": an attacker sends a pingback to a legitimate Blog A, but providing information of the legitimate Blog B (impersonation).[4] Then, Blog A needs to check Blog B for the existence of the informed link, as it's how the pingback protocol works, and thus it downloads the page off Blog B server's, causing a reflection.[4] If the target page is big, this amplifies the attack, because a small request sent to Blog A causes it to make a big request to Blog B.[4] This can lead to 10x, 20x, and even bigger amplifications (DoS).[4] It's even possible to use multiple reflectors, to prevent exhausting each of them, and use the combined amplification power of each to exhaust the target Blog B, being by overloading bandwidth or the server CPU (DDoS).[4]

Wordpress changed a bit how the pingback feature works to mitigate this kind of vulnerability: the IP address that originated the pingback (the attacker address) started being recorded, and thus shown in the log.[5] Notwithstanding, in 2016, pingback attacks continued to exist, supposedly because the website owners don't check the user agent logs, that have the real IP addresses.[5][4] It has to be noted that, if the attacker is more than a script kiddie, he will know how to prevent his IP address being recorded, by, for example, sending the request from another machine/site, so that this machine/site IP address is recorded instead, and the IP logging then, becomes less worthy.[6] Thus, it's still recommended to disable the pingbacks, to prevent attacking other sites (although this does not prevent being target of attacks).[5]

See also[edit]

  • Webmention, a modern re-implementation of PingBack using HTTP and x-www-urlencoded POST data.
  • Linkback, the suite of protocols that allows websites to manually and automatically link to one another.
  • Refback, a similar protocol but easier than Pingbacks since the site originating the link doesn't have to be capable of sending a Pingback
  • Trackback, a similar protocol but more prone to spam.
  • Search engine optimization

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brenner, Bill. "Anatomy of Wordpress XML-RPC Pingback Attacks". The Akamai Blog, March 31, 2014 5:42 AM. Retrieved July 7, 2014. 
  2. ^ Cid, Daniel. "More Than 162,000 WordPress Sites Used for Distributed Denial of Service Attack". Sucuri Blog, March 10, 2014. Retrieved July 7, 2014. 
  3. ^ Calin, Bogdan. "WordPress Pingback Vulnerability". Accunetix, December 17, 2012 - 01:17pm. Retrieved July 7, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Krassi Tzvetanov (May 4, 2016). "WordPress pingback attack". A10 Networks. Retrieved 2 February 2017. This issue arises from the fact that it is possible for an attacker A to impersonate T's blog by connecting to R's blog and sending a link notification that specifies T's blog as the origination of the notification. At that point, K will automatically attempt to connect to T to download the blog post. This is called reflection. If the attacker were careful to select a URL that has a lot of information in it, this would cause amplification. In other words, for a relatively small request from the attacker (A) to the reflector, the reflector (R) will connect to the target (T) and cause a large amount of traffic. [...] On the reflector side for the 200-byte request, the response can easily be thousands of bytes – resulting in a multiplication that starts in the 10x, 20x and more. [...] To avoid overloading the reflector, multiple reflectors can be employed to scale up. Thus, the target will have their outgoing bandwidth, and possibly compute resources, exhausted. [...] Another point to consider is the compute resources tied to the target side. If considering a page that is computationally expensive to produce, it may be more efficient for the attacker to overload the CPU of a system versus the bandwidth of the connection. [...] This is not the first time a CMS, and in particular WordPress, has been used for DDoS or other malicious activity. To a very large extent, this is because WordPress appeals to users that do not have the resources to manage their websites and they often use WordPress to make their job easier. As a result, many users do not have an adequate patch management program or proper monitoring to observe irregularities in their traffic. 
  5. ^ a b c Daniel Cid (February 17, 2016). "WordPress Sites Leveraged in Layer 7 DDoS Campaigns". Sucuri. Retrieved 2 February 2017. Starting in version 3.9, WordPress started to record the IP address of where the pingback request originated. That diminished the value of using WordPress as part of an attack; the platform would now record the attackers original IP address and it would show up in the log user agent. [...] Despite the potential reduction in value with the IP logging, attackers are still using this technique. Likely because website owners rarely check the user agent logs to derive the real IP address of visitors. [...] Although it is great that WordPress is logging the attacker IP address on newer releases, we still recommend that you disable pingbacks on your site. It won’t protect you from being attacked, but will stop your site from attacking others. 
  6. ^ Tim Butler (25 Nov 2016). "Analysis of a WordPress Pingback DDOS Attack". Conetix. Retrieved 2 February 2017. One enhancement WordPress added to the pingbacks in 3.7, which at least tracked the originating IP of the request. While this doesn't solve the problem, it at least allows you to trace where the calls are coming from. Unless the attacker is very, very naive however, this IP will simply trace back to another infected machine or site. Generally these requesting systems are part of a botnet to mask and distribute the requests. [...] The pingback tool within WordPress still remains an exploitable system for any WordPress site which hasn’t explicitly stopped it. From a web host’s perspective, this is quite frustrating. 

External links[edit]


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