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The Progressive Era: Crash Course US History #27
The Progressive Era: Crash Course US History #27
Published: 2013/08/29
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America in the 20th Century: The Progressive Era
America in the 20th Century: The Progressive Era
Published: 2013/11/11
Channel: Cori Greer-Banks
APUSH Review: The Progressive Era
APUSH Review: The Progressive Era
Published: 2013/04/07
Channel: Adam Norris
The Progressive Era (Rihanna
The Progressive Era (Rihanna's "Umbrella" Parody) - @MrBettsClass
Published: 2017/01/26
Channel: MrBettsClass
The Progressive Era
The Progressive Era
Published: 2009/03/11
Channel: Media Rich Learning
Progressive Presidents: Crash Course US History #29
Progressive Presidents: Crash Course US History #29
Published: 2013/09/12
Channel: CrashCourse
Progressive Era Amendments to the Constitution (APUSH) - @TomRichey
Progressive Era Amendments to the Constitution (APUSH) - @TomRichey
Published: 2014/07/03
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Child Labour During the Progressive Era
Child Labour During the Progressive Era
Published: 2015/01/21
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The Progressive Era Explained: US History Review
The Progressive Era Explained: US History Review
Published: 2009/01/02
Channel: Keith Hughes
America in the 20th Century - The Progressive Era
America in the 20th Century - The Progressive Era
Published: 2017/04/21
Channel: forquignon
The Progressive Era
The Progressive Era
Published: 2016/02/11
Channel: Kirsten Cole
The 20th Century (Part 1 1900-1909): "The Progressive Era"
The 20th Century (Part 1 1900-1909): "The Progressive Era"
Published: 2012/03/05
Channel: Edward Hopkins
Progressive Era: Social Reforms
Progressive Era: Social Reforms
Published: 2012/01/24
Channel: MrVEducation
Progressive Era: Progressive Presidents
Progressive Era: Progressive Presidents
Published: 2012/01/11
Channel: MrVEducation
The Progressive Era (1890 to 1920)
The Progressive Era (1890 to 1920)
Published: 2014/02/12
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American Pageant Chapter 28 APUSH Review
American Pageant Chapter 28 APUSH Review
Published: 2015/01/04
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Chapter 5: Social Reform in the Progressive Era
Chapter 5: Social Reform in the Progressive Era
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Workplace Safety - Progressive Era Reforms
Workplace Safety - Progressive Era Reforms
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Women in the Progressive Era and the New Deal
Women in the Progressive Era and the New Deal
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Progressive Era Review ("Thinking Out Loud" Parody) - @MrBettsClass
Progressive Era Review ("Thinking Out Loud" Parody) - @MrBettsClass
Published: 2015/05/05
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Red Jerry – Nu-Progressive Era CD1 [HD]
Red Jerry – Nu-Progressive Era CD1 [HD]
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Objective 2.9- Goals of the Progressive Era
Objective 2.9- Goals of the Progressive Era
Published: 2015/11/05
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the progressive era
the progressive era
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Patrick Newman: Rothbard vs. The Progressive Era
Patrick Newman: Rothbard vs. The Progressive Era
Published: 2017/05/26
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Lesson 4: The Progressive Era
Lesson 4: The Progressive Era
Published: 2015/11/06
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Rothbard on the Progressive Era | Patrick Newman
Rothbard on the Progressive Era | Patrick Newman
Published: 2017/08/03
Channel: misesmedia
Progressive Era Education.
Progressive Era Education.
Published: 2013/03/11
Channel: Jimmy Kessler
Progressive Era / Many Reforms
Progressive Era / Many Reforms
Published: 2013/04/29
Channel: Central Washington University
The Robber Barons and the Progressive Era | Tom Woods
The Robber Barons and the Progressive Era | Tom Woods
Published: 2014/07/25
Channel: misesmedia
Hazardous Working Conditions in the Progressive Era
Hazardous Working Conditions in the Progressive Era
Published: 2013/02/03
Channel: Daniel Bartell
The Square Deal for Dummies - Teddy Roosevelt
The Square Deal for Dummies - Teddy Roosevelt's Progressive Era Reforms
Published: 2013/02/06
Channel: Keith Hughes
Political Reforms Progressive Era
Political Reforms Progressive Era
Published: 2016/02/23
Channel: Saralyn Pozernick
Progressive Era: Political Corruption and Working Conditions
Progressive Era: Political Corruption and Working Conditions
Published: 2012/01/10
Channel: MrVEducation
Women
Women's History Minute: Progressive Era
Published: 2015/03/09
Channel: National Women's History Museum - Administrative Offices
American Studies Progressive Era Visual Story - Muckrakers
American Studies Progressive Era Visual Story - Muckrakers
Published: 2016/01/08
Channel: Eddie Caumiant
Woodrow Wilson and the Progressive Era
Woodrow Wilson and the Progressive Era
Published: 2011/10/30
Channel: 50natmish
APUSH Review: Conservation And Preservation During The Progressive Era
APUSH Review: Conservation And Preservation During The Progressive Era
Published: 2017/01/27
Channel: Adam Norris
Progressive Era: The Muckrakers
Progressive Era: The Muckrakers
Published: 2012/01/11
Channel: MrVEducation
Progressive Era Music
Progressive Era Music
Published: 2016/11/21
Channel: njhxfireproof
The Changing Role of Women in the Progressive Era
The Changing Role of Women in the Progressive Era
Published: 2014/03/12
Channel: Robert Buchta
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America in the 20th Century The Progressive Era asf 5i6noue
Published: 2013/09/18
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Child Labor in the Progressive Era
Child Labor in the Progressive Era
Published: 2014/04/30
Channel: Kendra Gunter
APUSH Progressive Era (1900-1929) History Rap! (Music Video)
APUSH Progressive Era (1900-1929) History Rap! (Music Video)
Published: 2011/04/16
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Social Reform and the Progressive Era
Social Reform and the Progressive Era
Published: 2015/02/08
Channel: Emil De Jong
Immigrants: The Progressive Era
Immigrants: The Progressive Era
Published: 2015/11/18
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JK - Progressive Era (Official Video)
JK - Progressive Era (Official Video)
Published: 2013/09/19
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Ch. 18 - The Progressive Era, 1900-1916 (3)
Ch. 18 - The Progressive Era, 1900-1916 (3)
Published: 2016/07/04
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The Progressive Era 1
Published: 2014/10/07
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The Progressive Era
The Progressive Era
Published: 2016/09/23
Channel: RTHS_jeffguilford
Red Jerry – Nu-Progressive Era CD2 [HD]
Red Jerry – Nu-Progressive Era CD2 [HD]
Published: 2015/02/23
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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President Theodore Roosevelt
President William Howard Taft
President Woodrow Wilson
Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, 1901–09 (left), William Howard Taft, 1909–13 (center), and Woodrow Wilson, 1913–21 (right) were the main Progressive presidents; their administrations saw intense social and political change in American society.

The Progressive Era was a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States, from the 1890s to the 1920s.[1] The main objectives of the Progressive movement were eliminating problems caused by industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and corruption in government.

The movement primarily targeted political machines and their bosses. By taking down these corrupt representatives in office a further means of direct democracy would be established. They also sought regulation of monopolies (Trust Busting) and corporations through antitrust laws. These antitrust laws were seen as a way to promote equal competition for the advantage of legitimate competitors.

Many progressives supported prohibition of alcoholic beverages, ostensibly to destroy the political power of local bosses based in saloons, but others out of a religious motivation.[2] At the same time, women's suffrage was promoted to bring a "purer" female vote into the arena.[3] A third theme was building an Efficiency Movement in every sector that could identify old ways that needed modernizing, and bring to bear scientific, medical and engineering solutions; a key part of the efficiency movement was scientific management, or "Taylorism".

Many activists joined efforts to reform local government, public education, medicine, finance, insurance, industry, railroads, churches, and many other areas. Progressives transformed, professionalized and made "scientific" the social sciences, especially history,[4] economics,[5] and political science.[6] In academic fields the day of the amateur author gave way to the research professor who published in the new scholarly journals and presses. The national political leaders included Theodore Roosevelt, Robert M. La Follette, Sr., and Charles Evans Hughes on the Republican side, and William Jennings Bryan, Woodrow Wilson and Al Smith on the Democratic side. Yet, leaders of the movement also existed far from presidential politics. Jane Addams, Grace Abbott, Edith Abbott and Sophonisba Breckinridge were among the most influential Progressive Era reformers.

Initially the movement operated chiefly at local levels; later, it expanded to state and national levels. Progressives drew support from the middle class, and supporters included many lawyers, teachers, physicians, ministers, and business people.[7] Some Progressives strongly supported scientific methods as applied to economics, government, industry, finance, medicine, schooling, theology, education, and even the family. They closely followed advances underway at the time in Western Europe[8] and adopted numerous policies, such as a major transformation of the banking system by creating the Federal Reserve System in 1913.[9] Reformers felt that old-fashioned ways meant waste and inefficiency, and eagerly sought out the "one best system".[10][11]

Political reform[edit]

"The Awakening" Suffragists were successful in the West; their torch awakens the women struggling in the East and South in this cartoon by Hy Mayer in Puck Feb. 20, 1915

Disturbed by the waste, inefficiency, stubbornness, corruption, and injustices of the Gilded Age, the Progressives were committed to changing and reforming every aspect of the state, society and economy. Significant changes enacted at the national levels included the imposition of an income tax with the Sixteenth Amendment, direct election of Senators with the Seventeenth Amendment, Prohibition with the Eighteenth Amendment, and women's suffrage through the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.[12]

Muckraking: exposing corruption[edit]

Magazines were not a new medium but they became much more popular around 1900, some with circulations in the hundreds of thousands of subscribers. It was an age of Mass media. Thanks to the rapid expansion of national advertising, the cover price fell sharply to about 10 cents.[13] One cause was the heavy coverage of corruption in politics, local government and big business, especially by journalists and other writers who were labeled muckrakers. They wrote for popular magazines to expose social and political sins and shortcomings. They relied on their own investigative journalism reporting; muckrakers often worked to expose social ills and corporate and political corruption. Muckraking magazines–notably McClure's–took on corporate monopolies and crooked political machines while raising public awareness of chronic urban poverty, unsafe working conditions, and social issues like child labor.[14]

The journalists who specialized in exposing waste, corruption, and scandal operated at the state and local level, like Ray Stannard Baker, George Creel, and Brand Whitlock. Other like Lincoln Steffens exposed political corruption in many large cities; Ida Tarbell went after John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company. Samuel Hopkins Adams in 1905 showed the fraud involved in many patent medicines, Upton Sinclair's 1906 novel The Jungle gave a horrid portrayal of how meat was packed, and, also in 1906, David Graham Phillips unleashed a blistering indictment of the U.S. Senate. Roosevelt gave these journalists their nickname when he complained they were not being helpful by raking up all the muck.[15][16]

Modernization[edit]

The Progressives were avid modernizers, with a belief in science and technology as the grand solution to society's weaknesses. They looked to education as the key. Characteristics of Progressivism included a favorable attitude toward urban-industrial society, belief in mankind's ability to improve the environment and conditions of life, belief in an obligation to intervene in economic and social affairs, and a belief in the ability of experts and in the efficiency of government intervention.[17][18] Scientific management, as promulgated by Frederick Winslow Taylor, became a watchword for industrial efficiency and elimination of waste, with the stopwatch as its symbol.[19][20]

Women[edit]

Across the nation, middle-class women organized on behalf of social reforms during the Progressive Era. Using the language of municipal housekeeping women were able to push such reforms as Prohibition, women's suffrage, child-saving, and public health.

Middle class women formed local clubs, which after 1890 were coordinated by the General Federation of Women's Clubs (GFWC). Historian Paige Meltzer puts the GFWC in the context of the Progressive Movement, arguing that its policies:

built on Progressive-era strategies of municipal housekeeping. During the Progressive era, female activists used traditional constructions of womanhood, which imagined all women as mothers and homemakers, to justify their entrance into community affairs: as "municipal housekeepers," they would clean up politics, cities, and see after the health and wellbeing of their neighbors. Donning the mantle of motherhood, female activists methodically investigated their community's needs and used their "maternal" expertise to lobby, create, and secure a place for themselves in an emerging state welfare bureaucracy, best illustrated perhaps by clubwoman Julia Lathrop's leadership in the Children's Bureau. As part of this tradition of maternal activism, the Progressive-era General Federation supported a range of causes from the pure food and drug administration to public health care for mothers and children to a ban on child labor, each of which looked to the state to help implement their vision of social justice.[21]

Women's suffrage[edit]

The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) was an American women's rights organization formed in May 1890 as a unification of the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). The NAWSA set up hundreds of smaller local and state groups, with the goal of passing woman suffrage legislation at the state and local level. The NAWSA was the largest and most important suffrage organization in the United States, and was the primary promoter of women's right to vote. Carrie Chapman Catt was the key leader in the early 20th century. Like AWSA and NWSA before it, the NAWSA pushed for a constitutional amendment guaranteeing women's voting rights, and was instrumental in winning the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1920.[22][23] A breakaway group, the National Woman's Party, tightly controlled by Alice Paul, used civil disobedience to gain publicity and force passage of suffrage. Paul's members chained themselves to the White House fence in order to get arrested, then went on hunger strikes to gain publicity. While the British suffragettes stopped their protests in 1914 and supported the British war effort, Paul began her campaign in 1917 and was widely criticized for ignoring the war and attracting radical anti-war elements.[24]

Philanthropy[edit]

The number of rich families climbed exponentially, from 100 or so millionaires in the 1870s, to 4000 in 1892 and 16,000 in 1916. Many paid heed to Andrew Carnegie's The Gospel of Wealth that said they owed a duty to society that called for philanthropic giving to colleges, hospitals, medical research, libraries, museums, religion and social betterment.[25]

In the early 20th century, American philanthropy matured, with the development of very large, highly visible private foundations created by Rockefeller, and Carnegie. The largest foundations fostered modern, efficient, business-oriented operations (as opposed to "charity") designed to better society rather than merely enhance the status of the giver. Close ties were built with the local business community, as in the "community chest" movement.[26] The American Red Cross was reorganized and professionalized.[27] Several major foundations aided the blacks in the South, and were typically advised by Booker T. Washington. By contrast, Europe and Asia had few foundations. This allowed both Carnegie and Rockefeller to operate internationally with powerful effect.[28]

Democracy[edit]

Many Progressives sought to enable the citizenry to rule more directly and circumvent machines, bosses and professional politicians. The initiative and referendum made it possible to pass laws by skirting the legislature. The recall allowed for the removal of bad officials. The direct primary let people vote for which candidates to nominate, avoiding the conventions that the professionals dominated. Thanks to the efforts of Oregon State Representative William S. U'Ren and his Direct Legislation League, voters in Oregon overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure in 1902 that created the initiative and referendum processes for citizens to directly introduce or approve proposed laws or amendments to the state constitution, making Oregon the first state to adopt such a system. U'Ren also helped in the passage of an amendment in 1908 that gave voters power to recall elected officials, and would go on to establish, at the state level, popular election of U.S. Senators and the first presidential primary in the United States. In 1911, California governor Hiram Johnson established the Oregon System of "Initiative, Referendum, and Recall" in his state, viewing them as good influences for citizen participation against the historic influence of large corporations on state lawmakers.[29] These Progressive reforms were soon replicated in other states, including Idaho, Washington, and Wisconsin, and today roughly half of U.S. states have initiative, referendum and recall provisions in their state constitutions.[30]

About 16 states began using primary elections to reduce the power of bosses and machines.[31] The Seventeenth Amendment was ratified in 1913, requiring that all senators be elected by the people (they were formerly appointed by state legislatures). The main motivation was to reduce the power of political bosses, who controlled the Senate seats by virtue of their control of state legislatures. The result, according to political scientist Henry Jones Ford, was that the United States Senate had become a "Diet of party lords, wielding their power without scruple or restraint, in behalf of those particular interests" that put them in office.[32]

Municipal reform[edit]

A coalition of middle-class reform-oriented voters, academic experts, and reformers hostile to the political machines started forming in the 1890s and introduced a series of reforms in urban America, designed to reduce waste and inefficiency and corruption, by introducing scientific methods, compulsory education and administrative innovations.

The pace was set in Detroit Michigan, where Republican mayor Hazen S. Pingree first put together the reform coalition.[33] Many cities set up municipal reference bureaus to study the budgets and administrative structures of local governments.

Progressive mayors took the lead in many key cities,[34] such as Cleveland, Ohio (especially Mayor Tom Johnson); Toledo, Ohio;[35] Jersey City, New Jersey;[36] Los Angeles;[37] Memphis, Tennessee;[38] Louisville, Kentucky;[39] and many other cities, especially in the western states. In Illinois, Governor Frank Lowden undertook a major reorganization of state government.[40] In Wisconsin, the stronghold of Robert La Follette Sr., the Wisconsin Idea used the state university as a major source of ideas and expertise.[41]

Rural reform[edit]

As late as 1920, half the population lived in rural areas. They experienced their own progressive reforms, typically with the explicit goal of upgrading country life.[42] By 1910 most farmers subscribed to a farm newspaper, where editors promoted efficiency as applied to farming.[43] Special efforts were made to reach the rural South and remote areas, such as the mountains of Appalachia and the Ozarks.[44]

The most urgent need was better transportation to get out of the mud. The railroad system was virtually complete; the need was for much better roads. The traditional method of putting the burden on maintaining roads on local landowners was increasingly inadequate. New York State took the lead in 1898, and by 1916 the old system had been discarded in every area. Demands grew for local and state government to take charge. With the coming of the automobile after 1910, urgent efforts were made to upgrade and modernize dirt roads designed for horse-drawn wagon traffic. The American Association for Highway Improvement was organized in 1910. Funding came from automobile registration, and taxes on motor fuels, as well as state aid. In 1916, federal-aid was first made available to improve post-roads, and promote general commerce. Congress appropriated $75 million over a five-year period, with the Secretary of Agriculture in charge through the Bureau of Public Roads, in cooperation with the state highway departments. There were 2.4 million miles of rural dirt rural roads in 1914; 100,000 miles had been improved with grading and gravel, and 3000 miles were given high quality surfacing. The rapidly increasing speed of automobiles, and especially trucks, made maintenance and repair a high priority. Concrete was first used in 1933, and expanded until it became the dominant surfacing material in the 1930s.[45][46] The South had fewer cars and trucks and much less money, but it worked through highly visible demonstration projects like the "Dixie Highway."[47]

Rural schools were often poorly funded, one room operations. Typically, classes were taught by young local women before they married, with only occasional supervision by county superintendents. The progressive solution was modernization through consolidation, with the result of children attending modern schools. There they would be taught by full-time professional teachers who had graduated from the states' teachers colleges, were certified, and were monitored by the county superintendents. Farmers complained at the expense, and also at the loss of control over local affairs, but in state after state the consolidation process went forward.[48][49]

Numerous other programs were aimed at rural youth, including 4-H clubs,[50] Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. County fairs not only gave prizes for the most productive agricultural practices, they also demonstrated those practices to an attentive rural audience. Programs for new mothers included maternity care and training in baby care.[51]

The movement's attempts at introducing urban reforms to rural America often met resistance from traditionalists who saw the country-lifers as aggressive modernizers who were condescending and out of touch with rural life. The traditionalists said many of their reforms were unnecessary and not worth the trouble of implementing. Rural residents also disagreed with the notion that farms needed to improve their efficiency, as they saw this goal as serving urban interests more than rural ones. The social conservatism of many rural residents also led them to resist attempts for change led by outsiders. Most important, the traditionalists did not want to become modern, and did not want their children inculcated with alien modern values through comprehensive schools that were remote from local control.[52][53] The most successful reforms came from the farmers who pursued agricultural extension, as their proposed changes were consistent with existing modernizing trends toward more efficiency and more profit in agriculture.

Race relations[edit]

Across the South black communities developed their own Progressive reform projects.[54][55] Typical projects involved upgrading the schools, modernizing church operations, expanding business opportunities, fighting for a larger share of state budgets, and engaging in legal action to secure equal rights.[56] Reform projects were especially notable in rural areas, where the great majority of Southern blacks lived.[57]

George Washington Carver (1860-1943) was well known for his research projects, especially involving agriculture. He was also a leader in promoting environmentalism.[58]

Rural blacks were specially involved in environmental issues, in which they developed their own traditions and priorities.[59][60]

Although, there were some achievements that improved conditions for African Americans and other non-white minorities, the Progressive Era was the nadir of American race relations. While white Progressives in principle believed in improving conditions for minority groups, there were wide differences in how this was to be achieved. Some, such as Lillian Wald, fought to ameliorate the plight of poor African Americans. Many, though, were concerned with enforcing, not eradicating, racial segregation. In particular, the mixing of black and white pleasure-seekers in 'black-and-tan' clubs troubled Progressive reformers.[61] The Progressive ideology espoused by many of the era attempted to correct societal problems created by racial integration following the Civil War by segregating the races and allowing each group to achieve its own potential. That is to say that most Progressives saw racial integration as a problem to be solved, rather than a goal to be achieved.[62][63][64] As white progressives sought to help the white working-class, clean-up politics, and improve the cities, the country instated the system of racial segregation known as Jim Crow.[65]

Family and food[edit]

Colorado judge Ben Lindsey a pioneer in the establishment of juvenile court systems.

Progressives believed that the family was the foundation stone of American society, and the government, especially municipal government, must work to enhance the family.[66] Local public assistance programs were reformed to try to keep families together. Inspired by crusading Judge Ben Lindsey of Denver, cities established juvenile courts to deal with disruptive teenagers without sending them to adult prisons.[67][68]

The purity of food, milk and drinking water became a high priority in the cities. At the state and national levels new food and drug laws strengthened urban efforts to guarantee the safety of the food system. The 1906 federal Pure Food and Drug Act, which was pushed by drug companies and providers of medical services, removed from the market patent medicines that had never been scientifically tested.[69]

With the decrease in standard working hours, urban families had more leisure time. Many spent this leisure time at movie theaters. Progressives advocated for censorship of motion pictures as it was believed that patrons (especially children) viewing movies in dark, unclean, potentially unsafe theaters, might be negatively influenced in witnessing actors portraying crimes, violence, and sexually suggestive situations. Progressives across the country influenced municipal governments of large urban cities, to build numerous parks where it was believed that leisure time for children and families could be spent in a healthy, wholesome environment, thereby fostering good morals and citizenship.[70]

Eugenics[edit]

Some Progressives sponsored eugenics as a solution to excessively large or underperforming families, hoping that birth control would enable parents to focus their resources on fewer, better children.[71] Progressive leaders like Herbert Croly and Walter Lippmann indicated their classically liberal concern over the danger posed to the individual by the practice of Eugenics.[72] The Catholics strongly opposed birth control proposals such as eugenics.[73]

Constitutional change[edit]

The Progressives fixed some of their reforms into law by adding amendments 16, 17, 18, and 19 to the US Constitution. The 16th amendment made an income tax legal (this required an amendment due to Article One, Section 9 of the Constitution, which required that direct taxes be laid on the States in proportion to their population as determined by the decennial census). The Progressives also made strides in attempts to reduce political corruption through the 17th amendment (direct election of U.S. Senators). The most radical and controversial amendment came during the anti-German craze of World War I that helped the Progressives and others push through their plan for prohibition through the 18th amendment (once the Progressives fell out of power the 21st amendment repealed the 18th in 1933). The ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920, which recognized women's suffrage was last amendment during the progressive era.[74] Another significant constitutional change that began during the progressive era was the incorporation of the Bill of Rights so that those rights would apply to the states. In 1920, Benjamin Gitlow was convicted under the Espionage Act of 1917 and the case went all the way to the Supreme Court, where the justices decided that the First Amendment applied to the states as well as the federal government. Prior to that time, the Bill of Rights was considered to apply only to the federal government, not the states.

Prohibition[edit]

Prohibition was the outlawing of the manufacture, sale and transport of alcohol. Drinking itself was never prohibited. Throughout the Progressive Era, it remained one of the prominent causes associated with Progressivism at the local, state and national level, though support across the full breadth of Progressives was mixed. It pitted the minority urban Catholic population against the larger rural Protestant element, and Progressivism's rise in the rural communities was aided in part by the general increase in public consciousness of social issues of the temperance movement, which achieved national success with the passage of the 18th Amendment by Congress in late 1917, and the ratification by three-fourths of the states in 1919. Prohibition was essentially a religious movement backed by the Methodists, Baptists, Congregationalists, Scandinavian Lutherans and other evangelical churches. Activists were mobilized by the highly effective Anti-Saloon League.[75] Timberlake (1963) argues the dries sought to break the liquor trust, weaken the saloon base of big-city machines, enhance industrial efficiency, and reduce the level of wife beating, child abuse, and poverty caused by alcoholism.[76]

Agitation for prohibition began during the Second Great Awakening in the 1840s when crusades against drinking originated from evangelical Protestants.[77] Evangelicals precipitated the second wave of prohibition legislation during the 1880s, which had as its aim local and state prohibition. During the 1880s, referendums were held at the state level to enact prohibition amendments. Two important groups were formed during this period. The Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) was formed in 1874.[78] The Anti-Saloon League was formed in 1893, uniting activists from different religious groups.[79]

The third wave of prohibition legislation, of which national prohibition was the grand climax, began in 1907, when Georgia passed a statewide prohibition law. By 1917, two thirds of the states had some form of prohibition laws and roughly three quarters of the population lived in dry areas. In 1913, the Anti-Saloon League first publicly appealed for a prohibition amendment. They preferred a constitutional amendment over a federal statute because although harder to achieve, they felt it would be harder to change. In 1913, Congress passed the Webb-Kenyon Act, which forbade the transport of liquor into dry states. As the United States entered World War I, the Conscription Act banned the sale of liquor near military bases.[80] In August 1917, the Lever Food and Fuel Control Act banned production of distilled spirits for the duration of the war. The War Prohibition Act, November, 1918, forbade the manufacture and sale of intoxicating beverages (more than 2.75% alcohol content) until the end of demobilization.

The drys worked energetically to secure two-third majority of both houses of Congress and the support of three quarters of the states needed for an amendment to the federal constitution. Thirty-six states were needed, and organizations were set up at all 48 states to seek ratification. In late 1917, Congress passed the Eighteenth Amendment; it was ratified in 1919 and took effect in January 1920. It prohibited the manufacturing, sale or transport of intoxicating beverages within the United States, as well as import and export. The Volstead Act, 1919, defined intoxicating as having alcohol content greater than 0.5% and established the procedures for federal enforcement of the Act. The states were at liberty to enforce prohibition or not, and most did not try.[81]

Consumer demand, however, led to a variety of illegal sources for alcohol, especially illegal distilleries and smuggling from Canada and other countries. It is difficult to determine the level of compliance, and although the media at the time portrayed the law as highly ineffective, even if it did not eradicate the use of alcohol, it certainly decreased alcohol consumption during the period. The Eighteenth Amendment was repealed in 1933, with the passage of the Twenty-First Amendment, thanks to a well-organized repeal campaign led by Catholics (who stressed personal liberty) and businessmen (who stressed the lost tax revenue).[81]

Education[edit]

The Progressives sought to reform and modernize the schools at the local level. The era was notable for a dramatic expansion in the number of schools and students served, especially in the fast-growing metropolitan cities. After 1910 the smaller cities began building high schools. By 1940, 50% of young adults had earned a high school diploma. The result was the rapid growth of the educated middle class, who typically were the grass roots supporters of Progressive measures.[82] During the Progressive Era, many states began passing compulsory schooling laws.[83] An. emphasis on hygiene and health was made in education, with physical and health education becoming more important and widespread.[84]

Medicine and law[edit]

The "Flexner Report" of 1910, sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation, professionalized American medicine by discarding the scores of local small medical schools and focusing national funds, resources, and prestige on larger, professionalized medical schools associated with universities.[85][86] Prominent leaders included the Mayo Brothers whose Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, became world-famous for innovative surgery.[87]

In the legal profession, the American Bar Association set up in 1900 the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). It established national standards for law schools, which led to the replacement of the old system of young men studying law privately with established lawyers by the new system of accredited law schools associated with universities.[88]

Social sciences[edit]

Progressive scholars, based at the emerging research universities such as Harvard, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, Chicago, Michigan, Wisconsin and California, worked to modernize their disciplines. The heyday of the amateur expert gave way to the research professor who published in the new scholarly journals and presses. Their explicit goal was to professionalize and make "scientific" the social sciences, especially history,[4] economics,[5] and political science.[6] Professionalization meant creating new career tracks in the universities, with hiring and promotion dependent on meeting international models of scholarship.

Economic policy[edit]

President Wilson uses tariff, currency, and anti-trust laws to prime the pump and get the economy working.

The Progressive Era was one of general prosperity after the Panic of 1893—a severe depression—ended in 1897. The Panic of 1907 was short and mostly affected financiers. However, Campbell (2005) stresses the weak points of the economy in 1907–1914, linking them to public demands for more Progressive interventions. The Panic of 1907 was followed by a small decline in real wages and increased unemployment, with both trends continuing until World War I. Campbell emphasizes the resulting stress on public finance and the impact on the Wilson administration's policies. The weakened economy and persistent federal deficits led to changes in fiscal policy, including the imposition of federal income taxes on businesses and individuals and the creation of the Federal Reserve System.[89] Government agencies were also transformed in an effort to improve administrative efficiency.[90]

In the Gilded Age (late 19th century) the parties were reluctant to involve the federal government too heavily in the private sector, except in the area of railroads and tariffs. In general, they accepted the concept of laissez-faire, a doctrine opposing government interference in the economy except to maintain law and order. This attitude started to change during the depression of the 1890s when small business, farm, and labor movements began asking the government to intercede on their behalf.[90]

By the start of the 20th century, a middle class had developed that was leery of both the business elite and the radical political movements of farmers and laborers in the Midwest and West. The Progressives argued the need for government regulation of business practices to ensure competition and free enterprise. Congress enacted a law regulating railroads in 1887 (the Interstate Commerce Act), and one preventing large firms from controlling a single industry in 1890 (the Sherman Antitrust Act). These laws were not rigorously enforced, however, until the years between 1900 and 1920, when Republican President Theodore Roosevelt (1901–1909), Democratic President Woodrow Wilson (1913–1921), and others sympathetic to the views of the Progressives came to power. Many of today's U.S. regulatory agencies were created during these years, including the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Federal Trade Commission. Muckrakers were journalists who encouraged readers to demand more regulation of business. Upton Sinclair's The Jungle (1906) was influential and persuaded America about the supposed horrors of the Chicago Union Stock Yards, a giant complex of meat processing that developed in the 1870s. The federal government responded to Sinclair's book and The Neill-Reynolds Report with the new regulatory Food and Drug Administration. Ida M. Tarbell wrote a series of articles against Standard Oil, which was perceived to be a monopoly. This affected both the government and the public reformers. Attacks by Tarbell and others helped pave the way for public acceptance of the breakup of the company by the Supreme Court in 1911.[90]

When Democrat Woodrow Wilson was elected President with a Democratic Congress in 1912 he implemented a series of Progressive policies in economics. In 1913, the Sixteenth Amendment was ratified, and a small income tax was imposed on high incomes. The Democrats lowered tariffs with the Underwood Tariff in 1913, though its effects were overwhelmed by the changes in trade caused by the World War that broke out in 1914. Wilson proved especially effective in mobilizing public opinion behind tariff changes by denouncing corporate lobbyists, addressing Congress in person in highly dramatic fashion, and staging an elaborate ceremony when he signed the bill into law.[91] Wilson helped end the long battles over the trusts with the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914. He managed to convince lawmakers on the issues of money and banking by the creation in 1913 of the Federal Reserve System, a complex business-government partnership that to this day dominates the financial world.[92]

In 1913, Henry Ford dramatically increased the efficiency of his factories by large-scale use of the moving assembly line, with each worker doing one simple task in the production of automobiles. Emphasizing efficiency, Ford more than doubled wages (and cut hours from 9 a day to 8), attracting the best workers and sharply reducing labor turnover and absenteeism. His employees could and did buy his cars, and by cutting prices over and over he made the Model T cheap enough for millions of people to buy in the U.S. and in every major country. Ford's profits soared and his company dominated the world's automobile industry. Henry Ford became the world-famous prophet of high wages and high profits.[93]

Labor unions[edit]

Labor unions, especially the American Federation of Labor (AFL), grew rapidly in the early 20th century, and had a Progressive agenda as well. After experimenting in the early 20th century with cooperation with business in the National Civic Federation, the AFL turned after 1906 to a working political alliance with the Democratic party. The alliance was especially important in the larger industrial cities. The unions wanted restrictions on judges who intervened in labor disputes, usually on the side of the employer. They finally achieved that goal with the Norris–La Guardia Act of 1932.[94]

Immigration[edit]

The level of immigration grew steadily after 1896, with most new arrivals unskilled workers from eastern and southern Europe, who found jobs working in the steel mills, slaughterhouses, and construction crews in the mill towns and industrial cities. The start of World War I in 1914 suddenly stopped most international movement, which only resumed after 1919. Starting in the 1880s, the labor unions aggressively promoted restrictions on immigration, especially restrictions on Chinese and other Asians.[95] The basic fear was that large numbers of unskilled, low-paid workers would defeat the union's efforts to raise wages through collective bargaining.[96] Other groups, such as the prohibitionists, opposed immigration because it was the base of strength of the saloon power, and the West generally. Rural Protestants distrusted the urban Catholics and Jews who comprised most of the immigrants after 1890.[97] On the other hand, the rapid growth of the industry called for large numbers of new workers, so large corporations generally opposed immigration restriction. By the early 1920s a consensus had been reached that the total influx of immigration had to be restricted, and a series of laws in the 1920s accomplished that purpose.[98] A handful of eugenics advocates were also involved in immigration restriction.[99] Immigration restriction continued to be a national policy until after World War II.

During World War I, the Progressives strongly promoted Americanization programs, designed to modernize the recent immigrants and turn them into model American citizens, while diminishing loyalties to the old country.[100] These programs often operated through the public school system, which expanded dramatically.[101]

War[edit]

Although the Progressive Era was characterized by public support for World War I under Woodrow Wilson, there was also a substantial opposition to World War I.

Decline[edit]

In the 1940s typically historians saw the Progressive Era as a prelude to the New Deal and dated it from 1901 (when Roosevelt became president) to the start of World War I in 1914 or 1917.[102] Historians have moved back in time emphasizing the Progressive reformers at the municipal[103] and state[104] levels in the 1890s.

End of the Era[edit]

Much less settled is the question of when the era ended. Some historians who emphasize civil liberties decry their suppression during World War I and do not consider the war as rooted in Progressive policy.[105] A strong anti-war movement headed by noted Progressives including Jane Addams, was suppressed after Wilson's 1916 re-election, a victory largely enabled by his campaign slogan, "He kept us out of the war." [106] The slogan was no longer accurate by April 6 of the following year, when Wilson surprised much of the Progressive base that twice elected him and asked a joint session of Congress to declare war on Germany. The Senate voted 82–6 in favor; the House agreed, 373–50. Some historians see the so-called "war to end all wars" as a globalized expression of the American Progressive movement, with Wilson's support for a League of Nations as its climax.[107]

The politics of the 1920s was unfriendly toward the labor unions and liberal crusaders against business, so many if not most historians who emphasize those themes write off the decade. Urban cosmopolitan scholars recoiled at the moralism of prohibition and the intolerance of the nativists of the KKK, and denounced the era. Richard Hofstadter, for example, in 1955 wrote that prohibition, "was a pseudo-reform, a pinched, parochial substitute for reform" that "was carried about America by the rural-evangelical virus".[108] However, as Arthur S. Link emphasized, the Progressives did not simply roll over and play dead.[109] Link's argument for continuity through the twenties stimulated a historiography that found Progressivism to be a potent force. Palmer, pointing to leaders like George Norris, says, "It is worth noting that progressivism, whilst temporarily losing the political initiative, remained popular in many western states and made its presence felt in Washington during both the Harding and Coolidge presidencies."[110] Gerster and Cords argue that, "Since progressivism was a 'spirit' or an 'enthusiasm' rather than an easily definable force with common goals, it seems more accurate to argue that it produced a climate for reform which lasted well into the 1920s, if not beyond."[111] Even the Klan has been seen in a new light, as social historians now see Klansmen as "ordinary white Protestants" primarily interested in purification of the system, which had long been a core Progressive goal.[112]

While some Progressive leaders became reactionaries, that usually happened in the 1930s, not in the 1920s, as exemplified by William Randolph Hearst,[113] Herbert Hoover, Al Smith and Henry Ford.[114][115]

Business progressivism in 1920s[edit]

What historians have identified as "business progressivism", with its emphasis on efficiency and typified by Henry Ford and Herbert Hoover[116] reached an apogee in the 1920s. Wik, for example, argues that Ford's "views on technology and the mechanization of rural America were generally enlightened, progressive, and often far ahead of his times."[117]

Tindall stresses the continuing importance of the Progressive movement in the South in the 1920s involving increased democracy, efficient government, corporate regulation, social justice, and governmental public service.[118][119] William Link finds political Progressivism dominant in most of the South in the 1920s.[120] Likewise it was influential in the Midwest.[121]

Historians of women and of youth emphasize the strength of the Progressive impulse in the 1920s.[122] Women consolidated their gains after the success of the suffrage movement, and moved into causes such as world peace,[123] good government, maternal care (the Sheppard–Towner Act of 1921),[124] and local support for education and public health.[125] The work was not nearly as dramatic as the suffrage crusade, but women voted[126] and operated quietly and effectively. Paul Fass, speaking of youth, says "Progressivism as an angle of vision, as an optimistic approach to social problems, was very much alive."[127] International influences that sparked many reform ideas likewise continued into the 1920s, as American ideas of modernity began to influence Europe.[128]

There is general agreement that the Era was over by 1932, especially since a majority of the remaining Progressives opposed the New Deal.[129]

Notable progressive leaders[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John D. Buenker, John C. Burnham, and Robert M. Crunden, Progressivism (1986) pp 3–21
  2. ^ James H. Timberlake, Prohibition and the progressive movement, 1900–1920 (1970) pp 1–7
  3. ^ On purification, see David W. Southern, The Malignant Heritage: Yankee Progressives and the Negro Question, 1900–1915 (1968); Southern, The Progressive Era And Race: Reaction And Reform 1900–1917 (2005); Norman H. Clark, Deliver Us from Evil: An Interpretation of American Prohibition (1976) p 170; and Aileen Kraditor, The Ideas of the Woman Suffrage Movement: 1890–1920 (1967). 134–36
  4. ^ a b Richard Hofstadter, The Progressive Historians: Turner, Beard, Parrington (1968)
  5. ^ a b Joseph Dorfman, The economic mind in American civilization, 1918–1933 vol 3, 1969
  6. ^ a b Barry Karl, Charles E. Merriam and the Study of Politics (1975)
  7. ^ George Mowry, The California Progressives (1963) p 91.
  8. ^ Daniel T. Rodgers, Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (1998)
  9. ^ Michael Kazin; et al. (2011). The Concise Princeton Encyclopedia of American Political Turn up History. Princeton University Press. p. 181. ISBN 9781400839469. 
  10. ^ Lewis L. Gould, America in the Progressive Era, 1890–1914 (2000)
  11. ^ David B. Tyack, The One Best System: A History of American Urban Education (Harvard UP, 1974), p. 39
  12. ^ David E. Kyvig, Explicit and authentic acts: amending the U.S. Constitution, 1776–1995 (Kansas UP, 1996) pp. 208–14
  13. ^ Peter C. Holloran et al. eds. (2009). The A to Z of the Progressive Era. Scarecrow Press. p. 266. 
  14. ^ Herbert Shapiro, ed., The muckrakers and American society (Heath, 1968), contains representative samples as well as academic commentary.
  15. ^ Robert Miraldi, ed. The Muckrakers: Evangelical Crusaders (Praeger, 2000)
  16. ^ Harry H. Stein, "American Muckrakers and Muckraking: The 50-Year Scholarship," Journalism Quarterly, (1979) 56#1 pp. 9–17
  17. ^ John D. Buenker, and Robert M. Crunden. Progressivism (1986); Maureen Flanagan, America Reformed: Progressives and Progressivisms, 1890–1920s (2007)
  18. ^ Samuel Haber, Efficiency and Uplift Scientific Management in the Progressive Era 1890–1920 (1964) 656
  19. ^ Daniel Nelson, Frederick W. Taylor and the Rise of Scientific Management (1970).
  20. ^ J.-C. Spender; Hugo Kijne (2012). Scientific Management: Frederick Winslow Taylor’s Gift to the World?. Springer. p. 63. 
  21. ^ Paige Meltzer, "The Pulse and Conscience of America" The General Federation and Women's Citizenship, 1945–1960," Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies (2009), Vol. 30 Issue 3, pp. 52–76. online
  22. ^ Eleanor Flexner, Century of Struggle (1959), pp. 208–17.
  23. ^ Corrine M. McConnaughy, The Woman Suffrage Movement in America: A Reassessment (2013).
  24. ^ Nancy F. Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism (1989) pp. 51–82
  25. ^ Olivier Zunz, Philanthropy in America: A History (2012) ch 1 excerpt and text search
  26. ^ Nikki Mandell, "Allies or Antagonists? Philanthropic Reformers and Business Reformers in the Progressive Era," Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (2012), 11#1 71–117.
  27. ^ Branden Little. "Review of Jones, Marian Moser, The American Red Cross from Clara Barton to the New Deal" H-SHGAPE, H-Net Reviews. August, 2013, online
  28. ^ Zunz, p. 42
  29. ^ John M. Allswang, The initiative and referendum in California, 1898–1998, (2000) ch 1
  30. ^ "State Initiative and Referendum Summary". State Initiative & Referendum Institute at USC. Retrieved 27 November 2006. 
  31. ^ Alan Ware, The American direct primary: party institutionalization and transformation (2002)
  32. ^ Christopher Hoebeke, The road to mass democracy: original intent and the Seventeenth Amendment (1995) p. 18
  33. ^ Melvin G. Holli, Reform in Detroit: Hazen S. Pingree and Urban Politics (1969).
  34. ^ Kenneth Finegold, "Traditional Reform, Municipal Populism, and Progressivism," Urban Affairs Review, (1995) 31#1 pp 20-42
  35. ^ Arthur E. DeMatteo, "The Progressive As Elitist: 'Golden Rule' Jones And The Toledo Charter Reform Campaign of 1901," Northwest Ohio Quarterly, (1997) 69#1 pp 8–30
  36. ^ Eugene M. Tobin, "The Progressive as Single Taxer: Mark Fagan and the Jersey City Experience, 1900–1917," American Journal of Economics & Sociology, (1974) 33#3 pp 287–298
  37. ^ Martin J. Schiesl, "Progressive Reform in Los Angeles under Mayor Alexander, 1909–1913," California Historical Quarterly, (1975) 534#1, pp:37–56
  38. ^ G. Wayne Dowdy, "'A Business Government by a Business Man': E. H. Crump as a Progressive Mayor, 1910–1915," Tennessee Historical Quarterly, (2001) 60#3 3, pp 162–175
  39. ^ William E. Ellis, "Robert Worth Bingham and Louisville Progressivism, 1905–1910," Filson Club History Quarterly, (1980) 54#2 pp 169–195
  40. ^ William Thomas Hutchinson, Lowden of Illinois: the life of Frank O. Lowden (1957) vol 2
  41. ^ "Progressivism and the Wisconsin Idea". Wisconsin Historical Society. 2008. 
  42. ^ William L. Bowers, "Country-Life Reform, 1900–1920: A Neglected Aspect of Progressive Era History." Agricultural History 45#3 (1971): 211–21. in JSTOR
  43. ^ Stuart W. Shulman, "The Progressive Era Farm Press," Journalism History (1999) 25#1 pp. 27–36.
  44. ^ William A. Link, A Hard Country and a Lonely Place: Schooling, Society, and Reform in Rural Virginia, 1870–1920 (1986).
  45. ^ Harold U. Faulkner, The Decline of Laissez Faire, 1897–1917 (1951) pp. 233–36.
  46. ^ Charles Lee Dearing, American highway policy (1942).
  47. ^ Tammy Ingram, Dixie Highway: Road Building and the Making of the Modern South, 1900–1930 (2014).
  48. ^ David R. Reynolds, There goes the neighborhood: Rural school consolidation at the grass roots in early twentieth-century Iowa (University of Iowa Press, 2002).
  49. ^ Danbom, David B. (April 1979). "Rural Education Reform and the Country Life Movement, 1900–1920". Agricultural History. 53 (2): 464–66. JSTOR 3742421. 
  50. ^ Ellen Natasha Thompson, " The Changing Needs of Our Youth Today: The Response of 4-H to Social and Economic Transformations in Twentieth-century North Carolina." (PhD Diss. University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2012). online
  51. ^ Marilyn Irvin Holt, Linoleum, Better Babies, and the Modern Farm Woman, 1890–1930 (1995).
  52. ^ Danbom 1979, p. 473.
  53. ^ Richard Jensen and Mark Friedberger, Education and Social Structure: An Historical Study of Iowa, 1870–1930 (Chicago: Newberry Library, 1976, online).
  54. ^ John Dittmer, Black Georgia in the Progressive era, 1900–1920 (1980).
  55. ^ David W. Southern, The Progressive Era and Race: Reaction and Reform, 1900–1917 (2005)
  56. ^ Angela Jones, African American Civil Rights: Early Activism and the Niagara Movement (2011) online
  57. ^ Debra Reid, "Rural African Americans and Progressive Reform," Agricultural History (2000) 74#2 pp. 322–41 on Texas.
  58. ^ Mark D. Hersey, My Work Is That of Conservation: An Environmental Biography of George Washington Carver (2011) online
  59. ^ Dianne D. Glave, "'A Garden so Brilliant With Colors, so Original in its Design': Rural African American Women, Gardening, Progressive Reform, and the Foundation of an African American Environmental Perspective." Environmental History 8#3 (2003): 395–411.
  60. ^ Dianne D. Glave and Mark Stoll, eds., To Love the Wind and the Rain': African Americans and Environmental History. (2006).
  61. ^ Keire, Mara L. (2001). "The Vice Trust: A Reinterpretation of the White Slavery Scare in the United States, 1907–1917". Journal of Social History. 35: 5–41. 
  62. ^ Durrheim, Kevin; Dixon, John (2005). Racial Encounter: The Social Psychology of Contact and Desegregation. Routledge. pp. 134–135. 
  63. ^ Luebke, Paul (2000). Tar Heel Politics 2000. The University of North Carolina Press. p. 134. 
  64. ^ Noel, Hans (2014). Political Ideologies and Political Parties in America. Cambridge University Press. p. 147. 
  65. ^ Woodward, C. Vann (1955). The Strange Career of Jim Crow. 
  66. ^ Gwendoline Alphonso, "Hearth and Soul: Economics and Culture in Partisan Conceptions of the Family in the Progressive Era, 1900–1920," Studies in American Political Development, Oct 2010, Vol. 24 Issue 2, pp. 206–32
  67. ^ D'Ann Campbell, "Judge Ben Lindsey and the Juvenile Court Movement, 1901–1904," Arizona and the West, 1976, Vol. 18 Issue 1, pp. 5–20
  68. ^ James Marten, ed. Children and Youth during the Gilded Page and Progressive Era (2014)
  69. ^ Marc T. Law, "The Origins of State Pure Food Regulation," Journal of Economic History, Dec 2003, Vol. 63 Issue 4, pp. 1103–31
  70. ^ Black, Gregory D. Hollywood Censored: Morality Codes, Catholics, and the Movies. Cambridge University Press 1994
  71. ^ Leonard, Thomas C. (2005) Retrospectives: Eugenics and Economics in the Progressive Era Journal of Economic Perspectives, 19(4): 207–24
  72. ^ Nancy Cohen, The reconstruction of American liberalism, 1865–1914 (2002) p. 243
  73. ^ Celeste Michelle Condit, The meanings of the gene: public debates about human heredity (1999) p. 51
  74. ^ David E. Kyvig, Explicit and authentic acts: amending the U.S. Constitution, 1776–1995 (1996)
  75. ^ K. Austin Kerr, Organized for Prohibition: A New History of the Anti-Saloon League (1985).
  76. ^ James Timberlake, Prohibition and the Progressive Movement, 1900–1920 (Harvard UP, 1963)
  77. ^ Jack S. Blocker, American Temperance Movements: Cycles of Reform (1989)
  78. ^ Jed Dannenbaum, Drink and Disorder: Temperance Reform in Cincinnati from the Washingtonian Revival to the WCTU (1984)
  79. ^ Kerr, Organized for Prohibition: A New History of the Anti-Saloon League (1985)
  80. ^ S.J. Mennell, "Prohibition: A Sociological View," Journal of American Studies 3, no. 2 (1969): 159–75.
  81. ^ a b David E. Kyvig,Repealing National Prohibition (2000)
  82. ^ David B. Tyack, The One Best System: A History of American Urban Education (Harvard University Press, 1974)
  83. ^ "State Compulsory School Attendance Laws". Infoplease.com. 1999-10-01. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  84. ^ Engs, Ruth C. (2003). The progressive era's health reform movement: a historical dictionary. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. pp. 20–22. ISBN 0-275-97932-6. 
  85. ^ Abraham Flexner, Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada 1910 (new edition 1960)
  86. ^ Lawrence Friedman and Mark McGarvie, Charity, philanthropy, and civility in American history (2003) p. 231
  87. ^ W. Bruce Fye, "The Origins and Evolution of the Mayo Clinic from 1864 to 1939: A Minnesota Family Practice Becomes an International 'Medical Mecca'", Bulletin of the History of Medicine Volume 84, Number 3, Fall 2010 pp. 323–57 in Project MUSE
  88. ^ Steven J. Diner, A Very Different Age: Americans of the Progressive Era (1998) p. 186
  89. ^ Ballard Campbell, "Economic Causes of Progressivism," Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Jan 2005, Vol. 4 Issue 1, pp. 7–22
  90. ^ a b c Harold U. Faulkner, The Decline of Laissez Faire, 1897–1917 (1951)
  91. ^ Vincent W. Howard, "Woodrow Wilson, The Press, and Presidential Leadership: Another Look at the Passage of the Underwood Tariff, 1913," CR: The Centennial Review, 1980, Vol. 24 Issue 2, pp. 167–14
  92. ^ Arthur S. Link, Woodrow Wilson and the progressive Era, 1910–1917 (1954) pp. 25–80
  93. ^ Faith Jaycox (2005). The Progressive Era: Eyewitness History. Infobase. p. 403. ISBN 9780816051595. 
  94. ^ Julie Greene, Pure and Simple Politics: The American Federation of Labor and Political Activism, 1881–1917 (1998)
  95. ^ Robert D. Parmet, Labor and immigration in industrial America (1987) p. 146
  96. ^ Gwendolyn Mink, Old Labor and New Immigrants in American Political Development: Union, Party and State, 1875–1920 (1990)
  97. ^ Daniel J. Tichenor, Dividing lines: the politics of immigration control in America (2002) p. 71
  98. ^ Claudia Golden, "The Political Economy of Immigration Restriction in the United States, 1890 to 1921," in Goldin, The regulated economy (1994) ch 7
  99. ^ Thomas C. Leonard, "Retrospectives: Eugenics and Economics in the Progressive Era" Journal of Economic Perspectives, (2005) 19(4): 207–24
  100. ^ James R. Barrett, "Americanization from the Bottom, Up: Immigration and the Remaking of the American Working Class, 1880–1930," Journal of American History 79 (December 1992): 996–1020. in JSTOR
  101. ^ Christina A. Ziegler-McPherson, Americanization in the States: Immigrant Social Welfare Policy, Citizenship, and National Identity in the United States, 1908–1929 (2009)
  102. ^ Eric Goldman, Rendezvous with Destiny: A History of Modern American Reform (1952)
  103. ^ Melvin G. Holli, Reform in Detroit: Hazen S. Pingree and Urban Politics (1969)
  104. ^ David P. Thelen, The New Citizenship: Origins of Progressivism in Wisconsin, 1885–1900 (1972)
  105. ^ Paul L. Murphy, World War I and the Origin of Civil Liberties in the United States (1979)
  106. ^ Jane Addams, Bread and Peace in Time of War (1922)
  107. ^ John Milton Cooper, Breaking the Heart of the World: Woodrow Wilson and the Fight for the League of Nations (2010)
  108. ^ Richard Hofstadter, The Age of Reform (1955) p. 287
  109. ^ Arthur S. Link, "What Happened to the Progressive Movement in the 1920s?," American Historical Review Vol. 64, No. 4 (Jul., 1959), pp. 833–51 in JSTOR
  110. ^ Niall A. Palmer, The Twenties in America: Politics and History (2006) p. 176
  111. ^ Patrick Gerster and Nicholas Cords, Myth in American History (1977) p. 203
  112. ^ Stanley Coben, "Ordinary white Protestants: The KKK of the 1920s," Journal of Social History, (1994) 28#1 pp. 155–65
  113. ^ Rodney P. Carlisle, Hearst and the New Deal: The Progressive as Reactionary (1979)
  114. ^ T. H. Watkins (2000). The Hungry Years: A Narrative History of the Great Depression in America. p. 313. 
  115. ^ Steven Watts (2009). The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century. Knopf Doubleday. p. 430. 
  116. ^ Joan Hoff Wilson, Herbert Hoover: Forgotten Progressive (1975)
  117. ^ Reynold M. Wik, "Henry Ford's Science and Technology for Rural America," Technology & Culture, July 1962, Vol. 3 Issue 3, pp. 247–57
  118. ^ George B. Tindall, "Business Progressivism: Southern Politics in the Twenties," South Atlantic Quarterly 62 (Winter 1963): 92–106.
  119. ^ George B. Tindall, The Emergence of the New South, 1913–1945 (1970)
  120. ^ William A. Link, The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880–1930 (1997) p. 294
  121. ^ Judith Sealander, Grand Plans: Business Progressivism and Social Change in Ohio's Miami Valley, 1890–1929 (1991)
  122. ^ Maureen A. Flanagan, America Reformed: Progressives and Progressivisms, 1890s–1920s (2006)
  123. ^ Susan Zeiger, "Finding a cure for war: Women's politics and the peace movement in the 1920s," Journal of Social History, Fall 1990, Vol. 24 Issue 1, pp. 69–86 in JSTOR
  124. ^ J. Stanley Lemons, "The Sheppard-Towner Act: Progressivism in the 1920s," Journal of American History Vol. 55, No. 4 (Mar., 1969), pp. 776–86 in JSTOR
  125. ^ Jayne Morris-Crowther, "Municipal Housekeeping: The Political Activities of the Detroit Federation of Women's Clubs in the 1920s," Michigan Historical Review, March 2004, Vol. 30 Issue 1, pp. 31–57
  126. ^ Kristi Andersen, After suffrage: women in partisan and electoral politics before the New Deal (1996)
  127. ^ Paula S. Fass, The damned and the beautiful: American youth in the 1920s (1977) p. 30
  128. ^ Daniel T. Rodgers, Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (2000) ch 9
  129. ^ Otis L. Graham, An Encore for Reform: The Old Progressives and the New Deal (1968)

Further reading[edit]

Overviews[edit]

  • Buenker, John D., John Chynoweth Burnham, and Robert Morse Crunden. Progressivism (Schenkman Books, 1977). online
  • Buenker, John D., and Edward R. Kantowicz, eds. Historical dictionary of the Progressive Era, 1890–1920 (Greenwood, 1988).
  • Cocks, Catherine, Peter C. Holloran and Alan Lessoff. Historical Dictionary of the Progressive Era (2009)
  • Dawley, Alan. Changing the World: American Progressives in War and Revolution (2003) excerpt and text search
  • Diner, Steven J. A Very Different Age: Americans of the Progressive Era (1998)
  • Flanagan, Maureen. America Reformed: Progressives and Progressivisms, 1890s–1920s (2007)
  • Glad, Paul W. "Progressives and the Business Culture of the 1920s," Journal of American History, Vol. 53, No. 1. (June 1966), pp. 75–89. in JSTOR
  • Gould, Lewis L. America in the Progressive Era, 1890–1914" (2000)
  • Gould Lewis L. ed., The Progressive Era (1974)
  • Hays, Samuel D. The Response to Industrialization, 1885–1914 (1957),
  • Hofstadter, Richard, The Age of Reform (1954), Pulitzer Prize
  • Jensen, Richard. "Democracy, Republicanism and Efficiency: The Values of American Politics, 1885–1930," in Byron Shafer and Anthony Badger, eds, Contesting Democracy: Substance and Structure in American Political History, 1775–2000 (U of Kansas Press, 2001) pp. 149–80; online version
  • Kennedy, David M. ed., Progressivism: The Critical Issues (1971), readings
  • Kloppenberg, James T. Uncertain victory: social democracy and progressivism in European and American thought, 1870–1920 1986 online at ACLS e-books
  • Lasch, Christopher. The True and Only Heaven: Progress and its Critics (1991)
  • Lears, T. J. Jackson. Rebirth of a Nation: The Remaking of Modern America, 1877-1920 (2009) excerpt and text search
  • Leuchtenburg, William E. "Progressivism and Imperialism: The Progressive Movement and American Foreign Policy, 1898–1916," The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 39#3 (1952), pp. 483–504. JSTOR
  • Link, William A. The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880–1930 (1992) online
  • Mann, Arthur. ed., The Progressive Era (1975) excerpts from scholars and from primary sources
  • McGerr, Michael. A Fierce Discontent: The Rise and Fall of the Progressive Movement in America, 1870–1920 (2003) excerpt and text search
  • Mowry, George. The Era of Theodore Roosevelt and the Birth of Modern America, 1900–1912. (1954) general survey of era
  • Noggle, Burl. "The Twenties: A New Historiographical Frontier," The Journal of American History, Vol. 53, No. 2. (Sep., 1966), pp. 299–314. in JSTOR
  • Painter, Nell Irvin. Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919 (1987) excerpt and text search
  • Pease, Otis, ed. The Progressive Years: The Spirit and Achievement of American Reform (1962), primary documents
  • Rodgers, Daniel T. Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (2000). stresses links with Europe online edition
  • Solty, Ingar. "Social Imperialism as Trasformismo: A Political Economy Case Study on the Progressive Era, the Federal Reserve Act, and the U.S.'s Entry into World War One, 1890–1917", in M. Lakitsch, Ed., Bellicose Entanglements 1914: The Great War as a Global War (LIT, 2015), pp. 91–121.
  • Thelen, David P. "Social Tensions and the Origins of Progressivism," Journal of American History 56 (1969), 323–41 online at JSTOR
  • Wiebe, Robert. The Search For Order, 1877–1920 (1967).
  • Young, Jeremy C. The Age of Charisma: Leaders, Followers, and Emotions in American Society, 1870-1940 (2017) excerpt and text search

Presidents and politics[edit]

  • Beale Howard K. Theodore Roosevelt and the Rise of America to World Power. (1956).
  • Blum, John Morton. The Republican Roosevelt. (1954). Series of essays that examine how TR did politics
  • Brands, H.W. Theodore Roosevelt (2001).
  • Clements, Kendrick A. The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson (1992).
  • Coletta, Paolo. The Presidency of William Howard Taft (1990).
  • Cooper, John Milton The Warrior and the Priest: Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt. (1983).
  • Cooper, John Milton Woodrow Wilson: A Biography (2009)
  • Dalton, Kathleen. "Changing interpretations of Theodore Roosevelt and the Progressive era." in Christopher M. Nichols and Nancy C. Unger, eds A Companion to the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (2017): 296-307.
  • Gould, Lewis L. The Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt (1991).
  • Harbaugh, William Henry. Power and Responsibility The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt (1961), a standard scholarly biography emphasizing politics. online
  • Harrison, Robert. Congress, Progressive Reform, and the New American State (2004).
  • Hofstadter, Richard. The American Political Tradition (1948), ch. 8–9–10.
  • Kolko, Gabriel (1963). The Triumph of Conservatism: A Reinterpretation of American History, 1900-1916. New York, NY: The Free Press. 
  • Link, Arthur S. Woodrow Wilson and the Progressive Era, 1910–1917 (1972) standard political history of the era online
  • Morris, Edmund Theodore Rex. (2001), biography of T. Roosevelt covers 1901–1909
  • Mowry, George E. Theodore Roosevelt and the Progressive Movement. (1946).
  • Pestritto, R.J. "Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism." (2005).
  • Sanders, Elizabeth. Roots of Reform: Farmers, Workers and the American State, 1877–1917 (1999).
  • Wilson, Joan Hoff. Herbert Hoover, Forgotten Progressive (1965).

State, local, gender, ethnic, business, labor, religion[edit]

  • Abell, Aaron I. American Catholicism and Social Action: A Search for Social Justice, 1865–1950 (1960).
  • Bruce, Kyle and Chris Nyland. "Scientific Management, Institutionalism, and Business Stabilization: 1903–1923" Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 35, 2001. in JSTOR
  • Buenker, John D. Urban Liberalism and Progressive Reform (1973).
  • Buenker, John D. The History of Wisconsin, Vol. 4: The Progressive Era, 1893–1914 (1998).
  • Feffer, Andrew. The Chicago Pragmatists and American Progressivism (1993).
  • Frankel, Noralee and Nancy S. Dye, eds. Gender, Class, Race, and Reform in the Progressive Era (1991).
  • Hahn, Steven. A Nation under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration (2003).
  • Huthmacher, J. Joseph. "Urban Liberalism and the Age of Reform" Mississippi Valley Historical Review 49 (1962): 231–41, in JSTOR; emphasized urban, ethnic, working class support for reform
  • Link, William A. The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880–1930 (1992).
  • Maxwell, Robert S. La Follette and the Rise of the Progressives in Wisconsin. Madison, Wis.: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1956.
  • Montgomery, David. The Fall of the House of Labor: The workplace, the state, and American labor activism, 1865–1925 (1987).
  • Muncy, Robyn. Creating A Feminine Dominion in American Reform, 1890–1935 (1991).
  • Lubove, Roy. The Progressives and the Slums: Tenement House Reform in New York City, 1890–1917 Greenwood Press: 1974.
  • Pollack, Norman (1962). The Populist Response to Industrial America: Midwestern Populist Thought. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 
  • Recchiuti, John Louis. Civic Engagement: Social Science and Progressive-Era Reform in New York City (2007).
  • Stromquist, Shelton. Reinventing 'The People': The Progressive Movement, the Class Problem, and the Origins of Modern Liberalism, (U. of Illinois Press, 2006). ISBN 0-252-07269-3.
  • Thelen, David. The New Citizenship, Origins of Progressivism in Wisconsin, 1885–1900 (1972).
  • Wesser, Robert F. Charles Evans Hughes: politics and reform in New York, 1905–1910 (1967).
  • Wiebe, Robert. "Business Disunity and the Progressive Movement, 1901–1914," The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 44#4 (1958), pp. 664–85. in JSTOR

Primary sources and year books[edit]


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