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Push Technology Introduction
Push Technology Introduction
Published: 2012/03/12
Channel: claritypr
Push Technology
Push Technology
Published: 2016/09/05
Channel: fingertecvideo
REST vs Diffusion
REST vs Diffusion
Published: 2016/03/01
Channel: Push Technology
Which Innovation Strategy: Technology-Push or Market-Pull? (8:02)
Which Innovation Strategy: Technology-Push or Market-Pull? (8:02)
Published: 2016/06/22
Channel: Master of Professional Studies in Technology Entrepreneurship
Push technology
Push technology
Published: 2014/08/26
Channel: Audiopedia
Push Technology within REAL Studio Web Edition
Push Technology within REAL Studio Web Edition
Published: 2010/09/22
Channel: danab629
Element Push Technology Review
Element Push Technology Review
Published: 2010/03/24
Channel: Tactics Boardshop
Intro to Web Push & Notifications
Intro to Web Push & Notifications
Published: 2017/04/26
Channel: Google Chrome Developers
IT PRO: Push technology, what is it ?
IT PRO: Push technology, what is it ?
Published: 2017/07/23
Channel: Skid Row Tran
The Computer Chronicles - Push Technology (1997)
The Computer Chronicles - Push Technology (1997)
Published: 2013/08/01
Channel: The Computer Chronicles
Pull vs Push a short animated explanation
Pull vs Push a short animated explanation
Published: 2014/07/21
Channel: efficiencyworksvideo
1 Technology Push vs Insight Driven Innovation - Mat Shore
1 Technology Push vs Insight Driven Innovation - Mat Shore
Published: 2014/08/21
Channel: MatShoreInnovation
ABC
ABC's of Push Technology
Published: 2011/10/27
Channel: Carl Van Eton
Why You Should Know the Difference Between Push and Pull Marketing
Why You Should Know the Difference Between Push and Pull Marketing
Published: 2015/09/08
Channel: White Shark Media
Push Technology
Push Technology's Lee Cottle on data-driven, real-time messaging
Published: 2016/06/06
Channel: developerWorks TV
Push-pull technology: an eco-friendly pest management system
Push-pull technology: an eco-friendly pest management system
Published: 2014/10/06
Channel: Nature Going Smart
Fetch Vs Push - Technology, Initiated Differences Of Fetch And Push
Fetch Vs Push - Technology, Initiated Differences Of Fetch And Push
Published: 2017/05/16
Channel: siLLy comparison
How Far Can We Push Technology?
How Far Can We Push Technology?
Published: 2015/09/16
Channel: jack.beck
Push Notifications: What are they and how do I send them?
Push Notifications: What are they and how do I send them?
Published: 2012/07/09
Channel: ParivedaInterns
Push-Pull Strategy and the Future of the BBC
Push-Pull Strategy and the Future of the BBC
Published: 2015/10/08
Channel: Culture Hunter
Manufacturing: Push or Pull? - Whiteboard Wednesday
Manufacturing: Push or Pull? - Whiteboard Wednesday
Published: 2015/05/13
Channel: Fishbowl
Push Technology Case Study - Arrow and IBM
Push Technology Case Study - Arrow and IBM
Published: 2014/05/21
Channel: UKArrowECS
A Video on Technology Push, Marketing & Market Pull
A Video on Technology Push, Marketing & Market Pull
Published: 2014/09/29
Channel: Aditi Kapur
Autonomy for Future SMD Missions - Breakout #2 ("push") - Technology Overviews
Autonomy for Future SMD Missions - Breakout #2 ("push") - Technology Overviews
Published: 2017/07/21
Channel: Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute
Calao Finance : présentation de Quadrille Ingénierie"push technology"
Calao Finance : présentation de Quadrille Ingénierie"push technology"
Published: 2016/09/05
Channel: CALAO FINANCE
MN2020: Fuel Standards Push Technology
MN2020: Fuel Standards Push Technology
Published: 2012/06/27
Channel: Minnesota 2020
IEEE Communications Standards Push Technology Forward
IEEE Communications Standards Push Technology Forward
Published: 2011/12/01
Channel: IEEE Standards Association
Push Pull Technology
Push Pull Technology
Published: 2017/01/05
Channel: Send a Cow
CityChlor Direct Push Technology - a field investigation (English #2)
CityChlor Direct Push Technology - a field investigation (English #2)
Published: 2012/10/01
Channel: CityChlor
Push technology for FX trading
Push technology for FX trading
Published: 2008/12/08
Channel: eforex
PUSH TECHNOLOGY
PUSH TECHNOLOGY
Published: 2012/02/02
Channel: miwingman25
Push vs Pull vs Push Pull for Radiators and Heatsinks Linus Tech Tips
Push vs Pull vs Push Pull for Radiators and Heatsinks Linus Tech Tips
Published: 2012/12/07
Channel: Linus Tech Tips
Connect all types of electrical conductors with Push-in Technology - Phoenix Contact
Connect all types of electrical conductors with Push-in Technology - Phoenix Contact
Published: 2017/04/25
Channel: Phoenix Contact USA
Enterprise application performance server push technologies with WebSockets
Enterprise application performance server push technologies with WebSockets
Published: 2016/07/06
Channel: OutSystems
SPEED now using TRAIN WITH PUSH Technology
SPEED now using TRAIN WITH PUSH Technology
Published: 2017/07/08
Channel: SPEED Hockey Development
Ableton Push: Review and First Look with Mad Zach
Ableton Push: Review and First Look with Mad Zach
Published: 2013/03/13
Channel: DJ TechTools
Push Technology and PushTowers
Push Technology and PushTowers
Published: 2014/03/06
Channel: AppCamel.com
dat franklyn zombie push technology
dat franklyn zombie push technology
Published: 2012/06/25
Channel: Polish Chris
ProfitVox(TM) Lead-Form-to-Phone Push Technology
ProfitVox(TM) Lead-Form-to-Phone Push Technology
Published: 2015/04/08
Channel: SterlingSignal
Me Push Technology Solutions
Me Push Technology Solutions
Published: 2017/07/14
Channel: Nicole Shoop
Sensitivity Air Push Technology Beetle and Keyboard
Sensitivity Air Push Technology Beetle and Keyboard
Published: 2013/08/18
Channel: Channel Q.
Rainbow PUSH technology
Rainbow PUSH technology
Published: 2015/06/13
Channel: slow911
07 Technology Push
07 Technology Push
Published: 2017/01/11
Channel: UnternehmerTUM
Push vs. Pull Marketing
Push vs. Pull Marketing
Published: 2015/05/05
Channel: Chris Gunkle
SFs Minimum Wage Push, Technology Could Push Out Some Restaurant Workers
SFs Minimum Wage Push, Technology Could Push Out Some Restaurant Workers
Published: 2014/07/28
Channel: Simon Perez
FIFA 17 PROTECT THE BALL TUTORIAL - SECRET PUSH BACK TECH TIPS & TRICKS -  NEW SHIELDING TECHNIQUE
FIFA 17 PROTECT THE BALL TUTORIAL - SECRET PUSH BACK TECH TIPS & TRICKS - NEW SHIELDING TECHNIQUE
Published: 2016/10/15
Channel: KRASI - BEST FIFA 18 TUTORIALS & TIPS & SKILLS
The Promise of HTTP/2 Server Push - Talk.JS/CSS
The Promise of HTTP/2 Server Push - Talk.JS/CSS
Published: 2016/07/31
Channel: Engineers.SG
Product Design (KS5) -
Product Design (KS5) - 'Technology Push Failure - The Sinclair C5'
Published: 2013/02/10
Channel: PHSTechDept
Push Messages: MicroTip #7 - Supercharged
Push Messages: MicroTip #7 - Supercharged
Published: 2017/07/06
Channel: Google Chrome Developers
Pushing Technology logo 5
Pushing Technology logo 5
Published: 2010/12/19
Channel: randy arnold
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Push technology, or server push, is a style of Internet-based communication where the request for a given transaction is initiated by the publisher or central server. It is contrasted with pull/get, where the request for the transmission of information is initiated by the receiver or client.

Push services are often based on information preferences expressed in advance. This is called a publish/subscribe model. A client "subscribes" to various information "channels" provided by a server; whenever new content is available on one of those channels, the server pushes that information out to the client.

Push is sometimes emulated with a polling technique, particularly under circumstances where a real push is not possible, such as sites with security policies that require rejection of incoming HTTP/S requests.

General use[edit]

Synchronous conferencing and instant messaging are typical examples of push services. Chat messages and sometimes files are pushed to the user as soon as they are received by the messaging service. Both decentralised peer-to-peer programs (such as WASTE) and centralised programs (such as IRC or XMPP) allow pushing files, which means the sender initiates the data transfer rather than the recipient.

Email may also be a push system: The SMTP protocol is a push protocol (see Push e-mail). However, the last step—from mail server to desktop computer—typically uses a pull protocol like POP3 or IMAP. Modern e-mail clients make this step seem instantaneous by repeatedly polling the mail server, frequently checking it for new mail. The IMAP protocol includes the IDLE command, which allows the server to tell the client when new messages arrive. The original BlackBerry was the first popular example of push-email in a wireless context.[citation needed]

Another example is the PointCast Network, which was widely adopted in the 1990s. It delivered news and stock market data as a screensaver. Both Netscape and Microsoft integrated push technology through the Channel Definition Format (CDF) into their software at the height of the browser wars, but it was never very popular. CDF faded away and was removed from the browsers of the time, replaced in the 2000s with RSS (a pull system.)

Other uses of push-enabled web applications include market data distribution (stock tickers), online chat/messaging systems (webchat), auctions, online betting and gaming, sport results, monitoring consoles, and sensor network monitoring.

Examples[edit]

Webpush[edit]

The Webpush proposal of the Internet Engineering Task Force is a simple protocol using HTTP version 2 to deliver realtime events, such as incoming calls or messages, which can be delivered (or "pushed") in a timely fashion. The protocol consolidates all real-time events into a single session which ensures more efficient use of network and radio resources. A single service consolidates all events, distributing those events to applications as they arrive. This requires just one session, avoiding duplicated overhead costs.[1]

HTTP server push[edit]

HTTP server push (also known as HTTP streaming) is a mechanism for sending unsolicited (asynchronous) data from a web server to a web browser. HTTP server push can be achieved through any of several mechanisms.

As a part of HTML5 the WebSocket API allows a web server and client to communicate over a full-duplex TCP connection.

Generally the web server does not terminate a connection after response data has been served to a client. The web server leaves the connection open so that if an event occurs (for example, a change in internal data which needs to be reported to one or multiple clients), it can be sent out immediately; otherwise, the event would have to be queued until the client's next request is received. Most web servers offer this functionality via CGI (e.g., Non-Parsed Headers scripts on Apache HTTP Server). The underlying mechanism for this approach is chunked transfer encoding.

Another mechanism is related to a special MIME type called multipart/x-mixed-replace, which was introduced by Netscape in 1995. Web browsers interpret this as a document changing whenever the server feels like pushing a new version to the client.[2] It is still supported by Firefox, Opera, and Safari today, but it is ignored by Internet Explorer.[3] It can be applied to HTML documents, and also for streaming images in webcam applications.

The WHATWG Web Applications 1.0 proposal[4] includes a mechanism to push content to the client. On September 1, 2006, the Opera web browser implemented this new experimental system in a feature called "Server-Sent Events".[5][6] It is now being standardized as part of HTML5.[7]

Pushlet[edit]

In this technique, the server takes advantage of persistent HTTP connections, leaving the response perpetually "open" (i.e., the server never terminates the response), effectively fooling the browser to remain in "loading" mode after the initial page load could be considered complete. The server then periodically sends snippets of JavaScript to update the content of the page, thereby achieving push capability. By using this technique, the client doesn't need Java applets or other plug-ins in order to keep an open connection to the server; the client is automatically notified about new events, pushed by the server.[8][9] One serious drawback to this method, however, is the lack of control the server has over the browser timing out; a page refresh is always necessary if a timeout occurs on the browser end.

Long polling[edit]

Long polling is itself not a true push; long polling is a variation of the traditional polling technique, but it allows emulating a push mechanism under circumstances where a real push is not possible, such as sites with security policies that require rejection of incoming HTTP/S Requests.

With long polling, the client requests information from the server exactly as in normal polling, but with the expectation the server may not respond immediately. If the server has no new information for the client when the poll is received, instead of sending an empty response, the server holds the request open and waits for response information to become available. Once it does have new information, the server immediately sends an HTTP/S response to the client, completing the open HTTP/S Request. Upon receipt of the server response, the client often immediately issues another server request. In this way the usual response latency (the time between when the information first becomes available and the next client request) otherwise associated with polling clients is eliminated.[10]

For example, BOSH is a popular, long-lived HTTP technique used as a long-polling alternative to a continuous TCP connection when such a connection is difficult or impossible to employ directly (e.g., in a web browser);[11] it is also an underlying technology in the XMPP, which Apple uses for its iCloud push support.

Flash XMLSocket relays[edit]

This technique, used by Cbox and other chat applications, makes use of the XMLSocket object in a single-pixel Adobe Flash movie. Under the control of JavaScript, the client establishes a TCP connection to a unidirectional relay on the server. The relay server does not read anything from this socket; instead it immediately sends the client a unique identifier. Next, the client makes an HTTP request to the web server, including with it this identifier. The web application can then push messages addressed to the client to a local interface of the relay server, which relays them over the Flash socket. The advantage of this approach is that it appreciates the natural read-write asymmetry that is typical of many web applications, including chat, and as a consequence it offers high efficiency. Since it does not accept data on outgoing sockets, the relay server does not need to poll outgoing TCP connections at all, making it possible to hold open tens of thousands of concurrent connections. In this model, the limit to scale is the TCP stack of the underlying server operating system.

Reliable Group Data Delivery (RGDD)[edit]

In services such as Cloud Computing, to increase reliability and availability of data, it is usually pushed (replicated) to several machines. For example, the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) makes 2 extra copies of any object stored. RGDD focuses on efficiently casting an object from one location to many while saving bandwidth by sending minimal number of copies (only one in the best case) of the object over any link across the network. For example, Datacast [12] is an scheme for delivery to many nodes inside datacenters that relies on regular and structured topologies and DCCast [13] is a similar approach for delivery across datacenters.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ M. Thomson, E. Damaggio and B. Raymor (October 22, 2016). "Generic Event Delivery Using HTTP Push". Internet Draft. Internet Engineering Task Force. Retrieved October 28, 2016. 
  2. ^ CGI Programming on the World Wide Web O'Reilly book explaining how to use Netscape server-push
  3. ^ Server-Push Documents (HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide) O'Reilly book explaining server-push
  4. ^ "Web Applications 1.0 specification". 
  5. ^ "Event Streaming to Web Browsers". 2006-09-01. Retrieved 2007-03-23. 
  6. ^ "Opera takes the lead with AJAX support among browsers: More efficient streaming". 2006-09-01. Retrieved 2007-03-23. 
  7. ^ Server-Sent Events
  8. ^ Pushlets introduction
  9. ^ JavaWorld article about pushlets
  10. ^ "RFC6202 - Known Issues and Best Practices for the Use of Long Polling and Streaming in Bidirectional HTTP". Retrieved 2016-05-14. 
  11. ^ "XEP-0124: Bidirectional-streams Over Synchronous HTTP (BOSH)". Retrieved 2012-06-26. 
  12. ^ C. Guo; et al. (November 1, 2012). "Datacast: A Scalable and Efficient Reliable Group Data Delivery Service For Data Centers". ACM. Retrieved Jun 6, 2017. 
  13. ^ M. Noormohammadpour; et al. (July 10, 2017). "DCCast: Efficient Point to Multipoint Transfers Across Datacenters". USENIX. Retrieved Jun 6, 2017. 

External links[edit]

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