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Ricky Proehl
No. 87, 81, 11, 88
Position: Wide receiver
Personal information
Born: (1968-03-07) March 7, 1968 (age 50)
Bronx, New York
Career information
High school: Hillsborough Township (NJ) Hillsborough
College: Wake Forest
NFL Draft: 1990 / Round: 3 / Pick: 58
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions: 669
Receiving yards: 8,878
Receiving touchdowns: 54
Player stats at

Richard Scott Proehl (born March 7, 1968) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League. Proehl played 17 seasons with the Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, Seattle Seahawks, Chicago Bears, St. Louis Rams, Carolina Panthers, and Indianapolis Colts. He played in four Super Bowls and won two: Super Bowl XXXIV with the Rams and Super Bowl XLI with the Colts.

After his playing career, Proehl was an assistant coach for the Carolina Panthers through the 2016 season. He returned to the Super Bowl as a coach with the Panthers in 2016.[1]

High school career[edit]

Proehl graduated in 1986 from Hillsborough High School in Hillsborough, New Jersey, where he starred in both football and baseball. During his senior season in football, he caught 42 passes for 900+ yards and 13 touchdowns. For his efforts that year, he was named a New York All-Metro selection, the Somerset County Player of the Year, and an All-State pick.

College career[edit]

Proehl played college football at Wake Forest University, where he was a four-year letterman in football. He holds the school record for receiving yards (2,949 yards), and touchdowns (25), as well as ranking in the top five in receptions and receiving average. He ended his college career playing in the Blue–Gray Football Classic and the East-West All-Star Game.

Professional career[edit]

Proehl was taken in the third round (58th overall) of the 1990 NFL Draft. He set the Cardinals rookie record for receptions and became the first rookie to lead the team in receptions since Bob Shaw in 1950. He played four more seasons for the Cardinals before being traded to the Seattle Seahawks for a draft pick. He spent two seasons with the Seahawks, signed with Chicago for one year, and ended up with the Rams for the start of the 1998 NFL season. As part of "The Greatest Show on Turf", he helped lead the Rams to a championship in the 1999 season at Super Bowl XXXIV. He spent three more seasons with St. Louis before signing with Carolina as a free agent at the start of the 2003 season. He was talked out of retirement for a 16th season by Panther quarterback Jake Delhomme and coach John Fox. Proehl retired and worked as a color analyst with the Rams' television pre-season games and the Rams radio network on various shows and pre-games. On November 29, 2006, Proehl came out of retirement to join the Indianapolis Colts, replacing injured WR Brandon Stokley.

Coaching career[edit]

Proehl was hired by the Carolina Panthers on February 1, 2011 as an Offensive Consultant. He was hired to primarily work with the wide receivers. He was Pro Football Focus's second runner up in their Wide Receiver Coach of the Year award.[2]

In the 2015 season, Proehl and the Panthers reached Super Bowl 50 on February 7, 2016. The Panthers fell to the Denver Broncos by a score of 24–10.[3]


Proehl is known for his role in three memorable playoff games:

  • As a member of the Rams in the 1999 NFC Championship Game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Proehl recorded six receptions for 100 yards and caught the game-winning touchdown pass with 4:44 to play. The Rams won 11-6 and went on to win the Super Bowl.
  • Two years later, in Super Bowl XXXVI against the New England Patriots, with the Rams trailing 17-10, Proehl caught a touchdown pass with 1:30 to play to tie the game, but the Patriots won on a last-second field goal by Adam Vinatieri, 20-17.
  • Two years after that, in Super Bowl XXXVIII against New England, this time as a member of the Panthers, Proehl again caught a touchdown pass with 1:08 remaining in the fourth quarter to tie the game. However, the Patriots won the game on another last-second field goal by Vinatieri, 32-29.
  • Proehl and Vinatieri became teammates in Indianapolis and were part of the Colts team that won Super Bowl XLI.

Super Bowl statistics[edit]

NFL statistics[edit]

Year Team Rec. Yds TD
1990 Phoenix Cardinals 56 802 4
1991 Phoenix Cardinals 55 766 2
1992 Phoenix Cardinals 60 744 3
1993 Phoenix Cardinals 65 877 7
1994 Arizona Cardinals 51 651 5
1995 Seattle Seahawks 5 29 0
1996 Seattle Seahawks 23 309 2
1997 Chicago Bears 58 753 7
1998 St. Louis Rams 60 771 3
1999 St. Louis Rams 33 349 0
2000 St. Louis Rams 31 441 4
2001 St. Louis Rams 40 563 5
2002 St. Louis Rams 43 466 4
2003 Carolina Panthers 27 389 4
2004 Carolina Panthers 34 497 0
2005 Carolina Panthers 25 441 4
2006 Indianapolis Colts 3 30 0
669 8,878 54

Personal life[edit]

Proehl and his wife, Kelly, live in Greensboro, North Carolina. The couple have three children: one daughter named Alex, and two sons named Austin and Blake. Austin is a wide receiver at the University of North Carolina. Blake signed a letter of intent to play football at East Carolina University on February 1, 2017.[4]

Proehl owns, manages, and coaches at Proehlific Park, which is a world-class sports performance complex and fitness center he built in Greensboro, North Carolina.[5]


External links[edit]


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