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Tokyo 2020: Japan goes wild after getting Summer Olympics
Tokyo 2020: Japan goes wild after getting Summer Olympics
Published: 2013/09/08
Channel: RT
2016 - Tokyo Olympic Bid - Promotional Advertisment
2016 - Tokyo Olympic Bid - Promotional Advertisment
Published: 2008/08/26
Channel: HIMetal93
Tokyo Bids for 2016 Olympics
Tokyo Bids for 2016 Olympics
Published: 2009/02/14
Channel: NTDTV
Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Venues PR Video
Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Venues PR Video
Published: 2016/08/05
Channel: Tokyo 2020
2020 Olympics - Istanbul, Tokyo and Madrid Promotional Candidate Videos
2020 Olympics - Istanbul, Tokyo and Madrid Promotional Candidate Videos
Published: 2013/07/03
Channel: Olympic
Tokyo wins bid to host 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Tokyo wins bid to host 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Published: 2013/09/08
Channel: ODN
Rio Wins 2016 Olympic Bid
Rio Wins 2016 Olympic Bid
Published: 2009/10/02
Channel: Sky News
Promotion video Tokyo - Candidate city for the 2020 Summer Olympic Games
Promotion video Tokyo - Candidate city for the 2020 Summer Olympic Games
Published: 2013/07/03
Channel: SportsceneTV
Olympic Bid 2016 - Tokyo
Olympic Bid 2016 - Tokyo
Published: 2009/10/04
Channel: IOC Media
Presentation by Tokyo, Japan
Presentation by Tokyo, Japan
Published: 2013/09/10
Channel: Olympic
2016 Olympics Bid IOC Voting (2nd October 2009) Live BBC News Coverage
2016 Olympics Bid IOC Voting (2nd October 2009) Live BBC News Coverage
Published: 2013/03/09
Channel: craydee1975
Japan Eagerly Bids to Host 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo
Japan Eagerly Bids to Host 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo
Published: 2012/08/07
Channel: CCTV Global Business
Sam Jameson and Governor Ishihara on Tokyo bid for Olympic Games
Sam Jameson and Governor Ishihara on Tokyo bid for Olympic Games
Published: 2009/04/12
Channel: Joel Legendre
Japan: Joy turns to pain for Madrid, Istanbul as Tokyo wins Olympic bid
Japan: Joy turns to pain for Madrid, Istanbul as Tokyo wins Olympic bid
Published: 2013/09/08
Channel: Ruptly TV
Tokyo bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics Documentary
Tokyo bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics Documentary
Published: 2017/04/03
Channel: Mindfuel
Tokyo lobbies IOC for Olympic bid
Tokyo lobbies IOC for Olympic bid
Published: 2009/09/30
Channel: AFP news agency
Tokyo wins 2020 Summer Olympic bid
Tokyo wins 2020 Summer Olympic bid
Published: 2013/09/15
Channel: Best News
Brazil: Olympics 2016 (Rio de Janeiro)
Brazil: Olympics 2016 (Rio de Janeiro)
Published: 2010/05/23
Channel: Aline R
French Authorities Investigating 2016, 2020 Olympic Bids
French Authorities Investigating 2016, 2020 Olympic Bids
Published: 2016/03/02
Channel: United News International
2016 Olympics Bid Announcement (2nd October 2009) - Various channels live coverage
2016 Olympics Bid Announcement (2nd October 2009) - Various channels live coverage
Published: 2013/03/07
Channel: craydee1975
Olympics 2016 Rio De Janeiro Brazil is the winner
Olympics 2016 Rio De Janeiro Brazil is the winner
Published: 2009/10/02
Channel: saddlesmania
MADRID OUT OF BIDDING TO HOST 2020 OLYMPICS
MADRID OUT OF BIDDING TO HOST 2020 OLYMPICS
Published: 2016/07/21
Channel: CNN
WRAP  IOC picks finalists for 2016 Olympics - Chicago, Tokyo, Madrid, Rio
WRAP IOC picks finalists for 2016 Olympics - Chicago, Tokyo, Madrid, Rio
Published: 2015/07/21
Channel: AP Archive
ISTANBUL LOOSES ITS BID TO HOST 2020 OLYMPICS
ISTANBUL LOOSES ITS BID TO HOST 2020 OLYMPICS
Published: 2016/07/21
Channel: CNN
Olympic Bid 2016 - Madrid
Olympic Bid 2016 - Madrid
Published: 2009/10/04
Channel: IOC Media
Tokyo 2020 Olympic Bid Under Investigation
Tokyo 2020 Olympic Bid Under Investigation
Published: 2016/05/26
Channel: NEWS ENGLISH
Tokyo Bids for Compact and Futuristic 2020 Olympic Games
Tokyo Bids for Compact and Futuristic 2020 Olympic Games
Published: 2013/08/17
Channel: NTDTV
Rio De Janeiro Wins Right to Host 2016 Olympics
Rio De Janeiro Wins Right to Host 2016 Olympics
Published: 2009/10/02
Channel: Associated Press
Celebrations in Tokyo over successful 2020 Olympics bid
Celebrations in Tokyo over successful 2020 Olympics bid
Published: 2013/09/08
Channel: euronews (in English)
Live from Chicago - 2016 Olympics Announcement Chicago Eliminated In First Round
Live from Chicago - 2016 Olympics Announcement Chicago Eliminated In First Round
Published: 2009/10/02
Channel: saddlesmania
Tokyo delegates arrive at IOC to present 2016 Olympic bid
Tokyo delegates arrive at IOC to present 2016 Olympic bid
Published: 2015/07/23
Channel: AP Archive
Los Angeles bids for the 2024 Summer Olympics | Cronkite News
Los Angeles bids for the 2024 Summer Olympics | Cronkite News
Published: 2016/08/10
Channel: Cronkite News
Rio de Janeiro Wins 2016 Olympic Games Bid
Rio de Janeiro Wins 2016 Olympic Games Bid
Published: 2009/10/02
Channel: TheAbcNews
IOC Tours Virtual Tokyo Olympic Stadium
IOC Tours Virtual Tokyo Olympic Stadium
Published: 2009/04/18
Channel: NTDTV
Tokyo 2020 | DanceSport
Tokyo 2020 | DanceSport's Bid II | DanceSport Total
Published: 2015/06/14
Channel: DanceSportTotal
Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid: "Chicago Rising"
Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid: "Chicago Rising"
Published: 2016/06/21
Channel: DNAinfo Chicago
Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid: Introducing the Venues
Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid: Introducing the Venues
Published: 2016/06/21
Channel: DNAinfo Chicago
Banzai! Japan celebrates winning Olympic 2020 bid
Banzai! Japan celebrates winning Olympic 2020 bid
Published: 2013/09/08
Channel: Channel 4 News
Tokyo Olympics 2020
Tokyo Olympics 2020
Published: 2016/11/13
Channel: Kenya CitizenTV
Tokyo awarded 2020 Summer Olympic Games
Tokyo awarded 2020 Summer Olympic Games
Published: 2013/09/08
Channel: The Telegraph
Japan launches new campaign to win the 2016 Olympics
Japan launches new campaign to win the 2016 Olympics
Published: 2015/07/21
Channel: AP Archive
Brazil city presents plans for 2016 Olympic bid
Brazil city presents plans for 2016 Olympic bid
Published: 2015/07/21
Channel: AP Archive
Madrid  Olympic Bid 2016
Madrid Olympic Bid 2016
Published: 2008/11/05
Channel: 7mingming
Japan Tokyo 2020 Olympic Bid Winner VIDEO Announcement  Tokyo Japan host 2020 Summer Olympic Games
Japan Tokyo 2020 Olympic Bid Winner VIDEO Announcement Tokyo Japan host 2020 Summer Olympic Games
Published: 2013/09/07
Channel: News
Public Lecture Video (7. 1. 2016) Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games: Public or Private Interest?
Public Lecture Video (7. 1. 2016) Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games: Public or Private Interest?
Published: 2016/07/06
Channel: Temple University, Japan Campus
Rio relishes Olympic bid win - 2 Oct 09
Rio relishes Olympic bid win - 2 Oct 09
Published: 2009/10/02
Channel: Al Jazeera English
Chicago 2016 Olympics - "America
Chicago 2016 Olympics - "America's Bid"
Published: 2011/08/20
Channel: SuperSfarrell
Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid: Venues Fly-By
Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid: Venues Fly-By
Published: 2016/06/21
Channel: DNAinfo Chicago
IOC wraps up evaluation visit to Olympic host hopeful Tokyo
IOC wraps up evaluation visit to Olympic host hopeful Tokyo
Published: 2013/03/07
Channel: efeinternational
Tokyo calls on manga heroes for 2016 Olympic bid
Tokyo calls on manga heroes for 2016 Olympic bid
Published: 2009/09/11
Channel: afpar
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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Bids for the
2016 (2016) Summer Olympics and Paralympics
Overview
Games of the XXXI Olympiad
XV Paralympic Games
Tokyo 2016 Olympic bid logo.svg
Tokyo bid slogan for the 2016 Summer Olympics.svg
Rio de Janeiro
Madrid · Tokyo · Chicago
Details
City Tokyo, Japan
Chair Ichiro Kono
NOC Japanese Olympic Committee
Evaluation
IOC score 8.3
Previous Games hosted
1964 Summer Olympics
Decision
Result 2nd Runner-up (20 votes)

The Tokyo bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics and Paralympics was an unsuccessful bid, first recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on September 14, 2007.[1] The IOC shortlisted four of the seven applicant cities—Chicago, United States; Madrid, Spain; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and Tokyo, Japan; over Baku, Azerbaijan; Doha, Qatar; and Prague, Czech Republic—on June 4, 2008 during a meeting in Athens, Greece.[2][3][4] This was followed by an intensive bidding process which finished with the election of Rio de Janeiro at the 121st IOC Session in Copenhagen, Denmark, on October 2, 2009.[5]

Tokyo earned the top scores during the Applicant phase, after a detailed study of the Applicant Files received by the IOC Working Group on January 14, 2008.[6] Between April 16 and April 19, 2009, the IOC Evaluation Commission, led by Nawal El Moutawakel, arrived in Tokyo to assess the conditions of the city.[7][8] The Commission attended technical presentations, participated in question-and-answer sessions about the Candidature File and made inspections in all the existing venues across the city.[9] Tokyo was eliminated in the second round of voting with only 20 votes in a three-round exhaustive ballot of the IOC.[10]

The Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC) nominated Tokyo over Fukuoka as its candidate city to host the 2016 Summer Olympics and Paralympics on August 30, 2006.[11] This is the country's third failure, after two failed attempts for the 1988 and the 2008 Summer Olympics.[12] Recent Olympic Games in Asia as the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China, hurt Tokyo's bid.[13] In 2013, Tokyo was selected to host the 2020 Summer Olympics, marking the second Summer Olympics in Japan, after the 1964 Summer Olympics, and the fourth hosted in Japan, after the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo and the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano.[14]

Tokyo's bid[edit]

Fleet of Toei Bus wrapped with Tokyo 2016 Olympic bid advertising.

City selection[edit]

The Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC) set a deadline of June 30, 2006, for cities to submit bids. It decided on August 30, 2006, that Tokyo would be the country's candidate for 2016. The other major internal candidate from Japan was the western city of Fukuoka on the island of Kyūshū.[15] Reportedly, Osaka (2008 Summer Olympics bid), Sapporo (which held the 1972 Winter Olympics), and Nagoya (1988 Summer Olympics bid) also expressed an interest in bidding,[13]

Bid details[edit]

Tokyo touted "the most compact and efficient Olympic Games ever" with a dramatic setting on the waterfront, previously an area used primarily for industry and shipping; Tokyo will have a chance to redevelop a rundown area (as London and Barcelona did in previous hostings), revitalizing the waterfront with housing, retail, and entertainment venues, some from land reclaimed from Tokyo Bay. The landfill will be a forest island for use as the site of equestrian, canoeing and other sporting events, named "Umi no Mori" or "Forest on the Sea".[16] The mottos were "Uniting Our Worlds" in English, and "It's Japan, so we can do it. The new Olympics!" (日本だから、できる。新しいオリンピック!, Nihon dakara Dekiru. Atarashī Olympic!) in Japanese.

Tokyo Skyline with Mount Fuji in the background

As an "alpha+" global city, Tokyo is one of the world's largest and most interconnected cities.[17] In addition to the existing urban rail network, already the world's most extensive,[18] three ring roads are currently[when?] being built around the city to help reduce congestion problems. Tokyo has also been consistent in funding public transport, a strength compared to other bid cities.[19] With over 124,000 hotel rooms nearby, ample accommodations are a highlighted strength of Tokyo's bid.[20]

The public relations firm of Weber Shandwick Worldwide was retained by the Tokyo 2016 Bid Committee to develop public relations campaigns and global support. Weber Shandwick's track record includes working on previous bids for the winning campaigns of Sydney in 2000, Turin in 2006, Beijing in 2008, and Sochi in 2014.[21]

The bid followed the success of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, which Japan co-hosted with South Korea. In addition to Tokyo's hosting of the 1964 Summer Olympics, Japan has past Olympic experience as the host of the 1972 Winter Games in Sapporo and the 1998 Winter Games in Nagano.

Venues[edit]

The Olympic park at the city center was to allow the Olympic experience to "permeate the city without compromising Olympic operations".[20] A new stadium (designed by Tadao Ando) was to be built to seat 100,000, and later pared back to 80,000 to leave a desired "legacy building". The new Olympic Village was to contain five high-rise buildings, each representing one of the Olympic Rings.[19] Primarily lying in two tight clusters of 31 planned venues, 21 already exist and the Japanese will need to build ten new venues, including five which would be temporary for Games use only.[20] Plans were to refurbish many venues from the 1964 Summer Olympic Games, located within just 20 minutes of the waterfront.[22] At first, the planned Media Center was to be located within ten minutes of the Ginza, on the site of the current Tsukiji fish market, but soil pollution has occurred around the newly planned Toyosu fish market, so the plan was separated from the discussion of the fish market's replacement. The Media Center has been changed to Tokyo Big Sight.[23]

Several existing and proposed facilities would host events at the 2016 Olympics.[24] Among them are the following:

The master plan does not show venues for either golf or rugby, however there is a golf course, Wakasu Golf Links, near Wakasu Olympic Marina (planned, for sailing) and Umi no Mori (Sea Forest) venues. Taizō Kawada, of the Japan Golf Association (JGA), suggests this venue could be used.[25]

Funding[edit]

The expenses for the bid are estimated at between 5.5 and 7 billion yen[19] (approximately US$50 million). Funding will come from the Tokyo Metropolitan Government to cover 1.5 billion for the preparations, and the remaining funds will come from the private sector. The plan gives evidence of a national financial guarantee to cover any cost over runs and some infrastructure projects. The bid budget is set at US $48 million jointly funded by private and public sources. This is in line with most other bids.[20] Estimated revenue is set at $1.557 billion.[20]

Nippon Budokan martial arts pavilion built for the 1964 Games

Green games[edit]

Tokyo also touted its effort to design green games that coexist in harmony with the natural environment. They will utilize five temporary structures and measures for reducing CO2 emissions and energy consumption. For example, the Olympic village, built in the Ariake area bordering Tokyo Bay, would feature an array of eco-friendly systems such as solar and renewable energy, and aim for total waste recycling. After the Games, they would be converted to rental apartments and condominiums in a greenery-rich area.[16][19]

The Yumenoshima landfill will be an 88-hectare island in Tokyo Bay with compost made from fallen leaves and twigs gathered in the public parks and streets of Tokyo. The trash landfill will be transformed into a green forest where 480,000 trees will be planted, in addition to the sports venues located on the island.[16] In addition, Tokyo plans to promote the use of more low-emissions buses and other vehicles in order to reduce in traffic congestion and help curb emissions from carbon dioxide.[16][26]

[edit]

The logo of the Tokyo bid takes the form of a traditional Japanese knot known as musubi. The five Olympic colors are used in the decorative knot; the musubi has long been utilized in Japan to signify blessings during times of celebration.[27]

Outlook[edit]

Leaders of the Tokyo bid crack open a barrel of sake with help from members of Bid Committee

Tokyo's bid was promoted to the Candidate City shortlist in June 2008.[28] Despite Tokyo's many strengths, the Beijing Games will have been held in the region eight years before, as well as Tokyo's own previous hosting in 1964.[29] However, on numerous occasions the Olympics have been held eight years apart on the same continent.

From 72% in March 2008,[30] Tokyo local support fell to 56% in May 2009,[31] the lowest support among the candidate cities. However, other polls conducted in early 2009 by some of the largest local publishers showed more than 70% support of the plan.[32] Tokyo had worked hard to increase the popularity of its bid,[33] even promoting the games on the Tokyo Tower and the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building by displaying "Tokyo" and "2016" in the Olympic colors.[34]

In the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly and the Diet of Japan, several left-wing and progressive parties opposed the bid; the Japan Communist Party (JCP), the Tokyo Seikatsusha Network (TSN) and the Social Democratic Party (SDPJ)[35] The JCP explained that because of the games, many highway lines, especially the Tokyo Gaikan Expressway will be constructed with huge costs, more than is allocated to other policies: welfare, labor, education and so on.[36] The new government led by the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) have been more cautious than the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) under the leadership of the governor, Shintarō Ishihara; Ishihara was the advocate for the bid in 2006. However, the DPJ voted for the resolutions which support this bid, both in the Diet and the Assembly, and their new Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama attended the meeting in Copenhagen.

Many former Olympic athletes lent their support on the Tokyo bid committee website, including Kōsuke Kitajima (gold medalist for the men's 100m and 200m breaststroke at both the Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 games). Three other athletes have also expressed their support: Koji Murofushi, the winner of the men's hammer throw in Athens 2004, Mara Yamauchi, a British long distance track and field woman athlete, and Mayumi Narita who holds 15 gold medals in three Paralympics with the women's swimming. In the PR video, French-Japanese TV announcer Christel Takigawa introduces the charm of Tokyo in French, and Riyo Mori, the Miss Universe 2007 winner, spoke in English. Naoko Takahashi, the champion in Sydney 2000 and the former world record holder in the women's marathon, is the project reader of a roughly 10,000 km virtual ekiden (long distance relay) from Tokyo to Copenhagen, the venue of the IOC meeting to determine the host city on October 2, 2009. The Tokyo Marathon is one of the main publicity events for this bid.

On September 7, 2013, Tokyo won their bid to host the 2020 Summer Olympics.

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "All seven 2016 Applicant Cities return responses". International Olympic Committee. January 14, 2008. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Four cities to compete to host the 2016 Olympic Games". International Olympic Committee. June 4, 2008. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Four on 2016 Olympics short-list". BBC. June 4, 2008. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  4. ^ "2016 Olympic Bid Short List Preview". GamesBids. June 3, 2008. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Rio de Janeiro Elected As 2016 Host City". International Olympic Committee. October 2, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  6. ^ 2016 Working Group Report (PDF), International Olympic Committee, March 14, 2008, retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  7. ^ "2016 Games: Start of the Evaluation Commission Visits". International Olympic Committee. April 3, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  8. ^ "IOC Commission Arrives In Tokyo For 2016 Inspection". GamesBids. April 14, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  9. ^ "IOC Inspection Of Tokyo 2016 Ends On High Note". GamesBids. April 19, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Rio de Janeiro to host 2016 Olympics". CNN. October 2, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Tokyo To Be Japan's 2016 Summer Games Bid Candidate". GamesBids. August 30, 2006. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Tokyo profile and fact sheet". GamesBids. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b "Rio to stage 2016 Olympic Games". BBC. October 2, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Tokyo joins race for 2016 Games". BBC. March 8, 2006. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Japan chooses Tokyo for 2016 bid". BBC Sport. 2006-08-30. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  16. ^ a b c d "Tokyo Promotes Eco-Friendly Games". GamesBids. Retrieved March 13, 2008. 
  17. ^ "The World According to GaWC 2008". Globalization and World Cities Research Network. Retrieved August 25, 2009. 
  18. ^ "Tokyo-Yokohama Suburban Rail Summary (Commuter Rail, Regional Rail)" (PDF). The Public Purpose. October 2003. Retrieved August 25, 2009. 
  19. ^ a b c d "Tokyo takes Chicago tack". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on December 10, 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  20. ^ a b c d e "Tokyo 2016 Releases Olympic Bid Questionnaire Response". GamesBids. Retrieved March 13, 2008. 
  21. ^ "Weber Shandwick To Support Tokyo 2016". GamesBids. Retrieved March 13, 2008. 
  22. ^ "Tokyo hoping compact bid will win IOC vote". Yahoo!. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  23. ^ 豊洲の土壌汚染問題 五輪プレスセンター建設にも影響 [Toyosu Soil Pollution Problem; Effects on Olympics Press Center] (in Japanese). Sankei Shimbun. 2008-05-20. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 
  24. ^ "Venue Plan - Olympic - Tokyo 2016 Bid Committee". Tokyo 2016 Bid Committee. Retrieved 2009-05-02. 
  25. ^ "GDO Back 9" (in Japanese). Gold Digest Online. Retrieved 2009-09-11. 
  26. ^ "Tokyo Committed to Carbon-Minus Games". Tokyo 2016 Bid Committee. 2009-03-05. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  27. ^ "Tokyo 2016 Unveil Highly Symbolic Logo". Tokyo 2016 Bid Committee. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  28. ^ "Chicago Makes 2016 Olympics Shortlist". CBS. 2008-06-04. Retrieved 2008-06-04. 
  29. ^ Hersh, Phillip (2007-09-13), "Chicago in 8-City Race for Olympics", Chicago Tribune 
  30. ^ "Ninety Two Million Citizens Support Tokyo 2016 Bid". GamesBids. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  31. ^ "Tokyo bid suffers in IOC support poll of residents". London: Guardian.co.uk. 2009-05-02. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  32. ^ "Support Continues to Rise Above 70% in Latest Polls" (in Japanese). Yomiuri.co.jp. 2009-05-02. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  33. ^ "Poll Shows Millions In Japan Aware Of Tokyo 2016 Bid". GamesBids. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  34. ^ "Landmarks Promote Tokyo 2016 Bid". GamesBids. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  35. ^ TSN is a local party, and it holds relationship with DPJ and SDPJ; SDPJ has no seats in the Assembly.
  36. ^ オリンピックの東京招致になぜ反対? [Why Oppose Tokyo's Olympic Invitation?] (in Japanese). Shimbun Akahata. 2009-03-18. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 

External links[edit]

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