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How Donald Trump Won the 2016 Election -  (TIMELINE)
How Donald Trump Won the 2016 Election - (TIMELINE)
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Election Night 2016 - Highlights
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Election Night Timeline: Which States To Watch
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Published: 2016/11/09
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Published: 2016/11/07
Channel: Going Viral
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Published: 2016/11/09
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Published: 2016/11/03
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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United States presidential election, 2016 timeline
United States
← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →

The following is a timeline of major events leading up to, during, and after the United States presidential election of 2016. The election was the 58th quadrennial and most recent United States presidential election, held on November 8, 2016. The presidential primaries and caucuses were held between February 1 and June 14, 2016, staggered among the 50 states, Washington, D.C., and U.S. territories. The U.S. Congress certified the electoral result on January 6, 2017, and the new President and Vice President were inaugurated on January 20, 2017.

Physician and political activist Jill Stein

2014[edit]

November 2014[edit]

December 2014[edit]

2015[edit]

January 2015[edit]

February 2015[edit]

March 2015[edit]

April 2015[edit]

May 2015[edit]

June 2015[edit]

July 2015[edit]

August 2015[edit]

  • August 3 – First presidential forum, featuring 14 Republican candidates, was broadcast on C-SPAN from the New Hampshire Institute of Politics in Goffstown, New Hampshire[37]
  • August 4Fox News announced which 10 candidates were invited to the first official Republican debate[38]
  • August 6 – First official presidential debate, featuring 10 Republican candidates, is held in Cleveland, Ohio[38] Fox News includes the other seven Republican candidates in a separate debate held earlier on the same day
  • August 11Lawrence Lessig forms an exploratory committee for a possible run for president, stating that if he raised $1 million by Labor Day he would run [39]
  • August 16Andy Martin formally announces his candidacy for the presidential nomination of the Republican Party
  • August 22Jimmy McMillan formally announces his candidacy for the presidential nomination of the Republican Party

September 2015[edit]

  • September 6Lawrence Lessig, Harvard University law professor, formally announces his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination[40]
  • September 8John McAfee, antivirus software developer, formally announces his candidacy for president under the banner of the newly formed Cyber Party[41]
  • September 11Rick Perry formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[42]
  • September 16 – Second Republican debate is held in Simi Valley, California[43]
  • September 21Scott Walker formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[44]
  • September 30 – South Carolina finalizes ballot for primary; 15 Republican candidates qualify[45]

October 2015[edit]

  • October 13 – First Democratic debate is held in Las Vegas, Nevada at the Wynn Casino[46]
  • October 16Lawrence Lessig announces he is dropping his much-derided promise to resign after passing his signature legislation. He stated he would to serve a full term as president and would flesh out his policy agenda accordingly[47]
  • October 20Jim Webb formally withdraws his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination[48]
  • October 21 – Vice President Joe Biden announces that he will not run for president in 2016[49]
  • October 23Lincoln Chafee formally withdraws his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination[50]
  • October 28 – Third Republican debate is held in Boulder, Colorado at the University of Colorado[51]

November 2015[edit]

December 2015[edit]

  • December 3 – The Republican Jewish Coalition Presidential Candidates Forum is held in Washington, D.C.[64]
  • December 9Jimmy McMillan formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[65]
  • December 15 – Fifth Republican debate is held in Las Vegas, Nevada[51]
  • December 19 – Third Democratic debate is held in Manchester, New Hampshire[51]
  • December 21Lindsey Graham formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[66]
  • December 24John McAfee, antivirus software developer, formally announces his candidacy for the Libertarian presidential nomination[67]
  • December 29George Pataki formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[68]

2016[edit]

January 2016[edit]

February 2016[edit]

March 2016[edit]

  • March 1Super Tuesday
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
      • Alabama Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[99]
      • Arkansas Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[99]
      • Colorado Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[99]
      • Georgia Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[99]
      • Massachusetts Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[99]
      • Minnesota Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[99]
      • Oklahoma Democratic primary won by Bernie Sanders[99]
      • Tennessee Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[99]
      • Texas Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[99]
      • Vermont Democratic primary won by Bernie Sanders[99]
      • Virginia Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[99]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • Alabama Republican primary won by Donald Trump[99]
      • Alaska Republican caucus won by Ted Cruz[99]
      • Arkansas Republican primary won by Donald Trump[99]
      • Georgia Republican primary won by Donald Trump[99]
      • Massachusetts Republican primary won by Donald Trump[99]
      • Minnesota Republican caucus won by Marco Rubio[99]
      • Oklahoma Republican primary won by Ted Cruz[99]
      • Tennessee Republican primary won by Donald Trump[99]
      • Texas Republican primary won by Ted Cruz[99]
      • Vermont Republican primary won by Donald Trump[99]
      • Virginia Republican primary won by Donald Trump[99]
  • March 3 – Eleventh Republican debate is held in Detroit, Michigan[100]
  • March 4Ben Carson formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[101]
  • March 5
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
      • Kansas Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[102]
      • Louisiana Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[102]
      • Nebraska Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[102]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • Kansas Republican caucus won by Ted Cruz[102]
      • Kentucky Republican caucus won by Donald Trump[102]
      • Louisiana Republican primary won by Donald Trump[102]
      • Maine Republican caucus won by Ted Cruz[102]
  • March 6
  • March 8
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
      • Democratic Michigan primary won by Bernie Sanders[105]
      • Democratic Mississippi primary won by Hillary Clinton[105]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • Republican Michigan primary won by Donald Trump[105]
      • Republican Mississippi primary won by Donald Trump[105]
      • Hawaii Republican caucus won by Donald Trump[105]
      • Idaho Republican primary won by Ted Cruz[105]
  • March 9 – Eighth and final Democratic debate is held in Miami, Florida[106]
  • March 10
  • March 12
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • Washington D.C. Republican caucus won by Marco Rubio[111]
      • Wyoming Republicans' county conventions are won by Ted Cruz[112]
      • Guam Republican caucus is held. Ted Cruz is awarded one delegate. The remaining eight delegates are uncommitted, pending a future meeting[113]
  • March 15
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
      • Florida Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[114]
      • Illinois Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[114]
      • Missouri Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[114]
      • North Carolina Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[114]
      • Ohio Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[114]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • Florida Republican primary won by Donald Trump[114]
      • Illinois Republican primary won by Donald Trump[114]
      • Missouri Republican primary won by Donald Trump[114]
      • North Carolina Republican primary won by Donald Trump[114]
      • Ohio Republican primary won by John Kasich[114]
      • Northern Marianas Republican caucus won by Donald Trump[115]
    • Marco Rubio formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[116]
  • March 21
  • March 22
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
      • Arizona Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[118]
      • Idaho Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[118]
      • Utah Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[118]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • Arizona Republican primary won by Donald Trump[118]
      • Utah Republican caucus won by Ted Cruz[118]
      • American Samoa Republican caucus is held; Ted Cruz and Donald Trump respectively secure one delegate each, majority of delegates remain uncommitted.[119]
  • March 26
    • Democratic caucuses:
      • Washington Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[120]
      • Alaska Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[120]
      • Hawaii Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[120]
  • March 29 – Republican town hall[121]

April 2016[edit]

  • April 1 – First ever nationally televised Libertarian presidential debate hosted by John Stossel airs on Fox Business Network (Part 1)[122]
  • April 2 – Delegate count at the North Dakota Republican State Convention is won by Ted Cruz[123]
  • April 5
    • Wisconsin Democratic primary won by Bernie Sanders[124]
    • Wisconsin Republican primary won by Ted Cruz[124]
  • April 8 – Part 2 of first ever nationally televised Libertarian presidential debate hosted by John Stossel airs on Fox Business Network
  • April 9 – Delegate count of the Colorado Republican convention is won by Ted Cruz[125]
  • April 9 – Wyoming Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[126]
  • April 14 – Ninth Democratic debate is held in Brooklyn, New York[127]
  • April 19
    • New York Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[128]
    • New York Republican primary won by Donald Trump[128]
  • April 26
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
      • Connecticut Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[129]
      • Delaware Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[130]
      • Maryland Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[131]
      • Pennsylvania Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[132]
      • Rhode Island Democratic primary won by Bernie Sanders[133]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • Connecticut Republican primary won by Donald Trump[129]
      • Delaware Republican primary won by Donald Trump[130]
      • Maryland Republican primary won by Donald Trump[131]
      • Pennsylvania Republican primary won by Donald Trump[132]
      • Rhode Island Republican primary won by Donald Trump[133]

May 2016[edit]

  • May 3
    • Indiana Democratic primary won by Bernie Sanders[134]
    • Indiana Republican primary won by Donald Trump[134]
    • Ted Cruz formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[135]
  • May 4John Kasich formally withdraws his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination[136]
  • May 7 – Guam Democratic caucuses won by Hillary Clinton[137]
  • May 10
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses:
      • West Virginia Democratic primary won by Bernie Sanders[138]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses:
      • West Virginia Republican primary won by Donald Trump[138]
      • Nebraska Republican primary won by Donald Trump[138]
  • May 12 – Second nationally televised Libertarian presidential debate airs on RT America.[139]
  • May 17
  • May 20 – Third nationally televised Libertarian presidential debate airs on TheBlaze.[141]
  • May 24 – Washington Republican primary won by Donald Trump[142]
  • May 26–30 – The Libertarian National Convention is held in Orlando, Florida. Gary Johnson is chosen as the party's presidential nominee and William Weld is chosen as the party's vice presidential nominee
  • May 26 – Donald Trump passes 1,237 pledged delegates, the minimum amount of delegates required to secure the Republican presidential nomination[143]

June 2016[edit]

  • June 4 – Virgin Islands Democratic caucuses won by Hillary Clinton[144]
  • June 5 – Puerto Rico Democratic caucuses won by Hillary Clinton
  • June 6 – Hillary Clinton passes 2383 pledged delegates, the minimum amount of delegates required to secure the Democratic presidential nomination.[145]
  • June 7
    • Democratic primaries/caucuses
      • California Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[146]
      • Montana Democratic primary won by Bernie Sanders[146]
      • New Jersey Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[146]
      • New Mexico Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[146]
      • North Dakota Democratic caucus won by Bernie Sanders[146]
      • South Dakota Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[146]
    • Republican primaries/caucuses
      • California Republican primary won by Donald Trump[146]
      • Montana Republican primary won by Donald Trump[146]
      • New Jersey Republican primary won by Donald Trump[146]
      • New Mexico Republican primary won by Donald Trump[146]
      • South Dakota Republican primary won by Donald Trump[146]
  • June 9
  • June 14 – Washington, D.C. Democratic primary won by Hillary Clinton[148]
  • June 15Jill Stein reaches the necessary number of delegates for the Green nomination and becomes presumptive nominee
  • June 22 – Libertarian presidential town hall hosted and aired by CNN[149]

July 2016[edit]

August 2016[edit]

September 2016[edit]

October 2016[edit]

November 2016[edit]

December 2016[edit]

  • December 19 – The electors of the Electoral College meet in their respective capitals and formally cast their ballots. Trump receives 304 electoral votes, Clinton receives 227. Seven faithless electors cast their votes for other candidates.[234]

2017[edit]

January 2017[edit]

Election results by state[edit]

States won by Clinton/Kaine
States won by Trump/Pence

Electoral methods

  • WTA – Winner-takes-all
  • CD – Congressional district
Hillary Clinton
Democratic
Donald Trump
Republican
Gary Johnson
Libertarian
Jill Stein
Green
Others Total
State or
district
Electoral
method
#  % Electoral
votes
#  % Electoral
votes
#  % Electoral
votes
#  % Electoral
votes
#  % Electoral
votes
#
Alabama WTA 729,547 34.36% 1,318,255 62.08% 9 44,467 2.09% 9,391 0.44% 21,712 1.02% 2,123,372
Alaska WTA 116,454 36.55% 163,387 51.28% 3 18,725 5.88% 5,735 1.80% 14,307 4.49% 318,608
Arizona WTA 1,161,167 45.46% 1,252,401 49.03% 11 106,327 4.16% 34,345 1.34% 2,554,240
Arkansas WTA 380,494 33.65% 684,782 60.57% 6 29,829 2.64% 9,473 0.84% 12,712 1.12% 1,130,635
California WTA 8,696,374 62.28% 55 4,452,094 31.88% 474,615 3.40% 275,823 1.98% 65,507 0.47% 13,964,413
Colorado WTA 1,338,870 48.16% 9 1,202,484 43.25% 144,121 5.18% 38,437 1.38% 27,391 0.99% 2,780,220
Connecticut WTA 897,572 54.57% 7 673,215 40.93% 48,676 2.96% 22,841 1.39% 508 0.03% 1,644,920
Delaware WTA 235,603 53.36% 3 185,127 41.92% 14,757 3.34% 6,103 1.38% N/A N/A 441,590
District of Columbia WTA 282,830 90.48% 3 12,723 4.07% 4,906 1.57% 4,258 1.36% 7,858 2.52% 312,575
Florida WTA 4,504,975 47.82% 4,617,886 49.02% 29 207,043 2.20% 64,399 0.68% 25,736 0.28% 9,420,039
Georgia WTA 1,877,963 45.89% 2,089,104 51.05% 16 125,306 3.06% N/A N/A 4,092,373
Hawaii WTA 266,891 61.0% 4 128,847 29.4% 15,954 3.6% 12,737 2.9% 13,235 3.1% 437,664
Idaho WTA 189,765 27.5% 409,055 59.2% 4 28,331 4.1% 8,496 1.2% 8,132 1.3% 690,255
Illinois WTA 3,090,729 55.8% 20 2,146,015 38.8% 209,596 3.8% 76,802 1.4% 5,536,424
Indiana WTA 1,039,126 37.91% 1,557,286 56.82% 11 133,993 4.89% 7,841 0.27% 2,712 0.10% 2,740,958
Iowa WTA 653,669 41.74% 800,983 51.15% 6 59,186 3.78% 11,479 0.73% 28,348 1.81% 1,566,031
Kansas WTA 427,005 36.05% 671,018 56.65% 6 55,406 4.68% 23,506 1.98% 947 0.08% 1,184,402
Kentucky WTA 628,854 32.68% 1,202,971 62.52% 8 53,752 2.79% 13,913 0.72% 1,879 0.10% 1,924,149
Louisiana WTA 780,154 38.45% 1,178,638 58.09% 8 37,978 1.87% 14,031 0.69% 9,684 0.48% 2,029,032
Maine (at-large) CD 352,156 47.84% 2 332,418 45.16% 37,578 5.10% 13,995 1.90%
Maine, 1st CD 210,921 53.95% 1 154,173 39.43% 18,429 4.71% 7,446 1.90%
Maine, 2nd CD 143,952 41.06% 180,665 51.53% 1 19,335 5.52% 6,629 1.89%
Maryland WTA 1,677,926 60.32% 10 943,169 33.91% 79,605 2.86% 35,945 1.29% 35,511 1.28% 2,781,485
Massachusetts WTA 1,995,196 60.93% 11 1,090,893 33.31% 138,018 4.22% 47,661 1.46% 71 0.002% 3,274,487
Michigan WTA 2,268,839 47.27% 2,279,543 47.50% 16 172,136 3.59% 51,463 1.07% 19,126 0.40% 4,799,284
Minnesota WTA 1,367,716 46.44% 10 1,322,951 44.92% 112,972 3.84% 36,985 1.26% 51,113 1.74% 2,944,813
Mississippi WTA 462,127 39.74% 678,284 58.32% 6 14,411 1.19% 3,595 0.31%
Missouri WTA 1,054,889 37.84% 1,585,753 56.88% 10 96,404 3.46% 25,086 0.90%
Montana WTA 177,709 35.93% 279,240 56.47% 3 28,037 5.67% 7,970 1.61% 1,570 0.32% 494,526
Nebraska (at-lrg) CD 283,322 34.32% 494,881 59.94% 2 38,746 4.69% 8,696 1.05% 825,645
Nebraska, 1st CD 99,092 36.07% 158,433 57.67% 1 13,881 5.05% 3,301 1.20% 274,707
Nebraska, 2nd CD 131,078 46.06% 136,934 48.11% 1 13,238 4.65% 3,348 1.18% 284,598
Nebraska, 3rd CD 53,198 19.96% 199,607 74.90% 1 11,642 4.37% 2,047 0.77% 266,494
Nevada WTA 539,260 47.92% 6 512,058 45.50% 37,384 3.32% 36,683 3.26% 1,125,385
New Hampshire WTA 348,526 46.98% 4 345,790 46.61% 30,777 4.15% 6,496 0.88% 9,232 1.24% 741,885
New Jersey WTA 1,967,444 54.77% 14 1,509,688 42.03% 72,143 1.86% 37,131 0.98%
New Mexico WTA 385,234 48.26% 5 319,666 40.04% 74,541 9.34% 9,879 1.24% 3,173 0.40% 798,318
New York WTA 4,145,376 57.89% 29 2,638,135 36.84% 162,273 2.28% 100,110 1.41%
North Carolina WTA 2,189,350 46.17% 2,362,697 49.83% 15 130,134 2.74% 12,093 0.26% 47,391 1.00% 4,741,665
North Dakota WTA 93,758 27.23% 216,794 62.96% 3 21,434 6.22% 3,780 1.10% 8,594 2.49% 344,360
Ohio WTA 2,320,596 43.51% 2,776,683 52.06% 18 174,266 3.16% 44,310 0.82%
Oklahoma WTA 420,375 28.93% 949,136 65.32% 7 83,481 5.75% N/A N/A 1,452,992
Oregon WTA 991,580 50.10% 7 774,080 39.11% 93,875 4.70% 49,247 2.49%
Pennsylvania WTA 2,926,025 47.86% 2,970,146 48.58% 20 146,667 2.40% 49,941 0.82%
Rhode Island WTA 227,062 53.83% 4 166,454 39.46% 14,700 3.18% 6,171 1.37%
South Carolina WTA 855,373 40.67% 1,155,389 54.94% 9 49,204 2.34% 13,034 0.62% 9,011 0.43% 2,103,027
South Dakota WTA 117,442 31.74% 227,701 61.53% 3 20,845 5.63%
Tennessee WTA 868,853 34.90% 1,519,926 61.06% 11 70,286 2.82% 15,952 0.64%
Texas WTA 3,877,868 43.24% 4,685,047 52.23% 38 283,492 3.16% 71,558 0.80% 8,895 0.10% 8,969,226
Utah WTA 310,674 27.46% 515,211 45.54% 6 39,608 3.50% 9,438 0.83%
Vermont WTA 178,573 55.72% 3 95,369 29.76% 10,078 3.14% 6,758 2.11% 29,060 9.07% 320,467
Virginia WTA 1,981,473 49.75% 13 1,769,443 44.43% 118,274 2.97% 27,638 0.69% 31,870 0.80% 3,982,752
Washington WTA 1,742,718 54.3% 12 1,221,747 38.07% 160,879 5.01% 58,417 1.82%
West Virginia WTA 188,794 26.48% 489,371 68.63% 5 23,004 3.23% 8,075 1.13% 713,051
Wisconsin WTA 1,381,823 46.44% 1,404,000 47.19% 10 106,585 3.58% 31,006 1.04% 2,975,313
Wyoming WTA 55,973 21.9% 174,419 68.2% 3 13,287 5.2% 2,515 1.0% 9,655 3.7% 258,788
U.S. Total 65,127,332 232 62,621,132 306 4,453,394 1,426,200 135,623,465

Two states (Maine and Nebraska) allow for their electoral votes to be split between candidates. The winner within each congressional district gets one electoral vote for the district. The winner of the statewide vote gets two additional electoral votes.[236][237] Results are from the Associated Press.[238]

Election campaign 2016 candidate participation timeline[edit]

Candidate announcement and, if applicable, withdrawal dates are as follows:

John McAfee Evan McMullin presidential campaign, 2016 Darrell Castle presidential campaign, 2016 Steve Kerbel Darryl Perry Marc Allan Feldman Rhett Smith Austin Petersen John McAfee Gary Johnson presidential campaign, 2016 William Kreml Kent Mesplay Sedinam Curry Darryl Cherney Elijah Manley Jill Stein presidential campaign, 2016 Jim Webb presidential campaign, 2016 Lincoln Chafee presidential campaign, 2016 Lawrence Lessig presidential campaign, 2016 Martin O'Malley presidential campaign, 2016 Bernie Sanders presidential campaign, 2016 Hillary Clinton presidential campaign, 2016 Rick Perry presidential campaign, 2016 Scott Walker presidential campaign, 2016 Bobby Jindal presidential campaign, 2016 Lindsey Graham presidential campaign, 2016 George Pataki presidential campaign, 2016 Mike Huckabee presidential campaign, 2016 Rick Santorum presidential campaign, 2016 Rand Paul presidential campaign, 2016 Chris Christie presidential campaign, 2016 Carly Fiorina presidential campaign, 2016 Jim Gilmore presidential campaign, 2016 Jeb Bush presidential campaign, 2016 Ben Carson presidential campaign, 2016 Marco Rubio presidential campaign, 2016 Ted Cruz presidential campaign, 2016 John Kasich presidential campaign, 2016 Donald Trump presidential campaign, 2016

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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