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Who Will Challenge Trump In 2020?
Who Will Challenge Trump In 2020?
Published: 2017/12/30
Channel: The Young Turks
Generic Democrat vs Donald Trump | 2020 Election Prediction
Generic Democrat vs Donald Trump | 2020 Election Prediction
Published: 2017/10/20
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
Sizing Up Democratic Bench For 2020 Election, President Obama
Sizing Up Democratic Bench For 2020 Election, President Obama's Speaking Fee | Morning Joe | MSNBC
Published: 2017/05/01
Channel: MSNBC
Top 5 People Running For 2020 Elections
Top 5 People Running For 2020 Elections
Published: 2016/11/09
Channel: MostAmazingTop5
2020 Election Prediction | John Kasich vs Donald Trump vs Joe Biden
2020 Election Prediction | John Kasich vs Donald Trump vs Joe Biden
Published: 2017/09/01
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
My 2020 Electoral Map Prediction
My 2020 Electoral Map Prediction
Published: 2016/11/16
Channel: Patriot
Who Are The Democrats Expected To Run In 2020 Election?
Who Are The Democrats Expected To Run In 2020 Election?
Published: 2017/07/21
Channel: TBTV
Oprah Winfrey vs Donald Trump | 2020 Election Prediction
Oprah Winfrey vs Donald Trump | 2020 Election Prediction
Published: 2018/01/08
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
2020 Election Night | FULL COVERAGE | 4000 Subscriber Special
2020 Election Night | FULL COVERAGE | 4000 Subscriber Special
Published: 2018/01/28
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
2020
2020's Nine Presidential Candidates (So Far) -- Colin's Last Stand (Episode 31)
Published: 2017/07/20
Channel: Colin's Last Stand
Why Democrats
Why Democrats' 2020 Candidates Are Already Losers
Published: 2016/11/30
Channel: The Young Turks
Gmod Deathrun Funny Moments - 2020 US Presidential Election
Gmod Deathrun Funny Moments - 2020 US Presidential Election
Published: 2016/11/19
Channel: VanossGaming
Former Vice President Joe Biden Looks Ahead To The 2020 Presidential Election | MSNBC
Former Vice President Joe Biden Looks Ahead To The 2020 Presidential Election | MSNBC
Published: 2018/02/08
Channel: MSNBC
2020 Election Night | Hillary Clinton vs Donald Trump
2020 Election Night | Hillary Clinton vs Donald Trump
Published: 2017/10/17
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
President Trump Reveals Who He Wants To Face In 2020 Election(VIDEO)!!!
President Trump Reveals Who He Wants To Face In 2020 Election(VIDEO)!!!
Published: 2017/10/23
Channel: GLOBAL News
TOP 10 Potential Candidates for Donald Trump in Presidential Election 2020
TOP 10 Potential Candidates for Donald Trump in Presidential Election 2020
Published: 2016/11/13
Channel: Top List BUZZ
Election Night 2020 | Donald Trump vs Bernie Sanders
Election Night 2020 | Donald Trump vs Bernie Sanders
Published: 2017/07/27
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
Donald Trump
Donald Trump's Likely Pathway to Re-Election in 2020
Published: 2018/02/22
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
Meet Trump
Meet Trump's first 2020 presidential challenger
Published: 2017/07/31
Channel: Fox News
2020 United States Presidential Election Prediction Pt. 1
2020 United States Presidential Election Prediction Pt. 1
Published: 2016/12/17
Channel: Acre !
#CPAC2018 Dr. Sebastian Gorka: "You can
#CPAC2018 Dr. Sebastian Gorka: "You can't legislate against mental illness"
Published: 2018/02/23
Channel: Rebel Media
Oprah 2020 Rumors Intensify
Oprah 2020 Rumors Intensify
Published: 2018/01/08
Channel: TYT Politics
2020 Election Night | Bernie Sanders vs Donald Trump
2020 Election Night | Bernie Sanders vs Donald Trump
Published: 2017/10/15
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
2020 Election Prediction | Donald Trump vs Kamala Harris
2020 Election Prediction | Donald Trump vs Kamala Harris
Published: 2017/06/21
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
Michael Bloomberg Predicts Trump Will Win Reelection in 2020
Michael Bloomberg Predicts Trump Will Win Reelection in 2020
Published: 2017/06/21
Channel: Washington Free Beacon
2020 United States Presidential Election Prediction Pt. 1
2020 United States Presidential Election Prediction Pt. 1
Published: 2017/09/23
Channel: Spamboyant
President Trump vs Bernie Sanders 2020 US election
President Trump vs Bernie Sanders 2020 US election
Published: 2018/01/24
Channel: 270_TO_WIN
'I'll beat Oprah': Donald Trump dismisses 2020 election speculation
Published: 2018/01/09
Channel: Guardian News
The 2020 Presidential Election Could Feature Oprah and President Trump
The 2020 Presidential Election Could Feature Oprah and President Trump
Published: 2018/01/10
Channel: Aubrey Taylor
Oprah Winfrey Claims Trump Is Eroding Global Respect - She May Run For President
Oprah Winfrey Claims Trump Is Eroding Global Respect - She May Run For President
Published: 2018/02/21
Channel: Jerry Eldred
Election Night 2020: President Trump vs Al Gore
Election Night 2020: President Trump vs Al Gore
Published: 2017/05/30
Channel: Stellar Spark
Gov. John Kasich on Presidential Election 2020 #JohnKasich2020 #Election2020 #JohnKasich #Breaking
Gov. John Kasich on Presidential Election 2020 #JohnKasich2020 #Election2020 #JohnKasich #Breaking
Published: 2017/10/15
Channel: Almutaz Bur News Network
2020 Election Night | Joe Biden vs Donald Trump
2020 Election Night | Joe Biden vs Donald Trump
Published: 2017/10/20
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
Vicente Fox is Running for President of the United States
Vicente Fox is Running for President of the United States
Published: 2017/09/07
Channel: Super Deluxe
Mike Bloomberg Discusses Hillary Campaign Failures, 2020 Presidential Elections
Mike Bloomberg Discusses Hillary Campaign Failures, 2020 Presidential Elections
Published: 2017/06/21
Channel: iBankCoin.com
2020 United States presidential election prediction Trump vs. Biden part 1
2020 United States presidential election prediction Trump vs. Biden part 1
Published: 2017/08/27
Channel: D346 R4
Democratic Primaries 2020 | Election Night | Biden vs Sanders vs Harris
Democratic Primaries 2020 | Election Night | Biden vs Sanders vs Harris
Published: 2018/02/24
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
2020 Election Night | Terry McAuliffe vs Donald Trump
2020 Election Night | Terry McAuliffe vs Donald Trump
Published: 2017/08/26
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
Ben Aaron Runs Down The Possible 2020 Presidential Candidates
Ben Aaron Runs Down The Possible 2020 Presidential Candidates
Published: 2017/03/06
Channel: Max Cool
Election Night 2020: Donald Trump vs Elizabeth Warren
Election Night 2020: Donald Trump vs Elizabeth Warren
Published: 2017/11/07
Channel: Election 2020
2020/24/28/32 United States Presidential Election Predictions (Go to Description for Info)
2020/24/28/32 United States Presidential Election Predictions (Go to Description for Info)
Published: 2017/02/11
Channel: Acre !
Bernie Sanders vs Donald Trump | 2020 Presidential Election Prediction
Bernie Sanders vs Donald Trump | 2020 Presidential Election Prediction
Published: 2018/02/18
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
COUNTDOWN TO THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION LIVE
COUNTDOWN TO THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION LIVE
Published: 2016/11/10
Channel: Justin Meep
2020 Election Night | Al Gore vs Donald Trump
2020 Election Night | Al Gore vs Donald Trump
Published: 2017/10/29
Channel: Let's Talk Elections
😜 USA Election 2020 Bet POLLS !! 😜 Exclusive
😜 USA Election 2020 Bet POLLS !! 😜 Exclusive
Published: 2017/10/13
Channel: teleherzog
Cory Booker Plans For President Election 2020
Cory Booker Plans For President Election 2020
Published: 2017/03/12
Channel: World News
Oprah Puts 2020 Presidential Rumors to Rest
Oprah Puts 2020 Presidential Rumors to Rest
Published: 2018/02/23
Channel: Wochit Entertainment
Sneak Peek 2020 U.S. Presidential Election
Sneak Peek 2020 U.S. Presidential Election
Published: 2017/12/01
Channel: Intuitive Edge
The Truth About Oprah Winfrey
The Truth About Oprah Winfrey's 2020 Presidential Run
Published: 2018/01/08
Channel: Press For Truth
USA Election 2020 predictions. Trump vs Sanders
USA Election 2020 predictions. Trump vs Sanders
Published: 2017/06/12
Channel: Will Lloyd
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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United States presidential election, 2020
United States
← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 β†’

538 members of the Electoral College
270 electoral votes needed to win

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About this image
The electoral map for the 2020 election, based on populations from the 2010 Census. The 2020 election will be the last election to use the data from the 2010 Census; the subsequent two elections will use information from the as yet-to-be-collected 2020 United States Census.

Incumbent President

Donald Trump
Republican



The United States presidential election of 2020, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn will either elect a new president and vice president through the electoral college or re-elect the incumbents. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.

President Donald Trump of the Republican Party, who was elected in 2016, is eligible to seek re-election. The winner of the 2020 presidential election is scheduled to be inaugurated on January 20, 2021.

Background

Procedure

Article Two of the United States Constitution states that for a person to serve as President of the United States the individual must be a natural-born citizen of the United States, at least 35 years old and a United States resident for at least 14 years. Candidates for the presidency typically seek the nomination of one of the various political parties of the United States, in which case each party develops a method (such as a primary election) to choose the candidate the party deems best suited to run for the position. The primary elections are usually indirect elections where voters cast ballots for a slate of party delegates pledged to a particular candidate. The party's delegates then officially nominate a candidate to run on the party's behalf. The nominee then personally chooses a vice presidential running mate to form that party's presidential ticket (with the exception of the Libertarian Party, which nominates its vice presidential candidate by delegate vote regardless of the nominee's preference). The general election in November is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots for a slate of members of the Electoral College; these electors then directly elect the President and Vice President.[1]

The Twenty-second Amendment to the Constitution states that an individual can not be elected to the presidency more than twice. This prohibits former Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama from being elected president again. Former presidents Jimmy Carter and George H. W. Bush, both having only served one term, are not constitutionally prohibited from being re-elected in the 2020 election.

Demographic trends

The age group of what will then be people in the 18 to 45-year-old bracket is expected to represent just under 40 percent of the United States' eligible voters in 2020. It is expected that more than 30 percent of eligible American voters will be nonwhite.[2]

Simultaneous elections

The presidential election will occur at the same time as elections to the Senate and the House of Representatives. Several states will also hold state gubernatorial and state legislative elections. Following the election, the United States House will redistribute the seats among the 50 states based on the results of the 2020 United States Census, and the states will conduct a redistricting of Congressional and state legislative districts. In most states, the governor and the state legislature conduct the redistricting (although some states have redistricting commissions), and often a party that wins a presidential election experiences a coattail effect that also helps other candidates of that party win election.[3] Therefore, the party that wins the 2020 presidential election could also win a significant advantage in the drawing of new Congressional and state legislative districts that would stay in effect until the 2032 elections.[4]

Advantage of incumbency

An incumbent president seeking re-election usually faces no significant opposition during their respective party's primaries, especially if they are still popular. For Presidents Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama, for example, their respective paths to nomination became uneventful and the races become merely pro forma; all four then went on to win a second presidential term. Serious challenges are rare, but then generally presage failure to win the general election in the fall. During the 1976 Republican Party primaries, then-former California Governor Reagan carried 23 states while running against incumbent President Gerald Ford; Ford then went on to lose the presidential election to Jimmy Carter, albeit carrying more states. Senator Ted Kennedy then carried 12 states while running against Carter during the 1980 Democratic Party primaries; Reagan then defeated Carter in the fall of 1980. Pat Buchanan captured a decent percentage of a protest vote against George H. W. Bush during the 1992 Republican primaries, but only received a handful of delegates; Bush too subsequently went on to lose in the general election to Clinton.

General election polling

National
Trump vs. Biden
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Joe Biden Others Undecided
Public Policy Polling[5] 687 February 9–11, 2018 Β± 3.7% 42% 51% – 7%
CNN/SSRS[6] 1,005 January 14–18, 2018 Β± 3.7% 37% 59% 2% 1%
Public Policy Polling[7] 862 December 11–12, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 54% – 6%
Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,993 November 9–11, 2017 Β± 2.0% 35% 46% – 20%
Public Policy Polling[9] 572 October 27–29, 2017 Β± 4.1% 38% 56% – 6%
Zogby Analytics[10] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 Β± 2.5% 41% 50% – 9%
Emerson College[11] 820 October 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.4% 42% 51% – 7%
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 53% – 6%
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 39% 51% – 11%
Public Policy Polling[14] 692 July 14–17, 2017 Β± 3.7% 39% 54% – 7%
Public Policy Polling[15] 692 June 9–11, 2017 Β± 3.7% 41% 54% – 5%
Public Policy Polling[16] 692 May 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.7% 40% 54% – 6%
Public Policy Polling[17] 648 April 17–18, 2017 Β± 3.9% 40% 54% – 6%
Public Policy Polling[18] 677 March 27–28, 2017 Β± 3.8% 40% 54% – 6%
Trump vs. Booker
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Cory Booker Undecided
Public Policy Polling[5] 687 February 9–11, 2018 Β± 3.7% 42% 46% 11%
Public Policy Polling[7] 862 December 11–12, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 50% 10%
Public Policy Polling[9] 572 October 27–29, 2017 Β± 4.1% 38% 49% 13%
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 47% 13%
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 39% 42% 19%
Public Policy Polling[14] 692 July 14–17, 2017 Β± 3.7% 40% 45% 15%
Public Policy Polling[15] 692 June 9–11, 2017 Β± 3.7% 41% 43% 17%
Public Policy Polling[16] 692 May 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.7% 39% 46% 15%
Public Policy Polling[17] 648 April 17–18, 2017 Β± 3.9% 42% 42% 17%
Public Policy Polling[18] 677 March 27–28, 2017 Β± 3.8% 42% 45% 13%
Trump vs. Gillibrand
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Kirsten Gillibrand Undecided
Public Policy Polling[5] 687 February 9–11, 2018 Β± 3.7% 43% 42% 15%
YouGov[19] 865 January 9, 2018 – 43% 41% 16%
Public Policy Polling[7] 862 December 11–12, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 47% 14%
Public Policy Polling[9] 572 October 27–29, 2017 Β± 4.1% 38% 48% 14%
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 39% 42% 18%
Trump vs. Harris
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Kamala Harris Undecided
Public Policy Polling[5] 687 February 9–11, 2018 Β± 3.7% 43% 43% 15%
Public Policy Polling[7] 862 December 11–12, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 46% 13%
Public Policy Polling[9] 572 October 27–29, 2017 Β± 4.1% 39% 45% 16%
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 41% 19%
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 39% 39% 22%
Zogby Analytics[20] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 38% 41% 21%
Public Policy Polling[14] 692 July 14–17, 2017 Β± 3.7% 40% 41% 19%
Public Policy Polling[15] 692 June 9–11, 2017 Β± 3.7% 41% 42% 18%
Trump vs. Kennedy
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Joe Kennedy III Undecided
Public Policy Polling[5] 687 February 9–11, 2018 Β± 3.7% 43% 46% 12%
Trump vs. Sanders
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Others Undecided
Public Policy Polling[5] 687 February 9–11, 2018 Β± 3.7% 44% 48% – 8%
CNN/SSRS[6] 1,005 January 14–18, 2018 Β± 3.7% 39% 58% 3% 1%
YouGov[19] 856 January 9, 2018 – 43% 48% – 9%
Public Policy Polling[7] 862 December 11–12, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 53% – 6%
Politico/Morning Consult[21] 2,586 November 16–19, 2017 Β± 2.0% 36% 42% – 22%
Public Policy Polling[9] 572 October 27–29, 2017 Β± 4.1% 38% 53% – 9%
Zogby Analytics[10] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 Β± 2.5% 40% 51% – 9%
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 51% – 9%
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 38% 51% – 11%
Public Policy Polling[14] 692 July 14–17, 2017 Β± 3.7% 39% 52% – 9%
Public Policy Polling[15] 692 June 9–11, 2017 Β± 3.7% 41% 51% – 8%
Public Policy Polling[16] 692 May 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.7% 39% 52% – 9%
Public Policy Polling[17] 648 April 17–18, 2017 Β± 3.9% 41% 50% – 8%
Public Policy Polling[18] 677 March 27–28, 2017 Β± 3.8% 41% 52% – 7%
Trump vs. Warren
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Public Policy Polling[5] 687 February 9–11, 2018 Β± 3.7% 44% 44% 12%
Public Policy Polling[22]
(for a Warren-aligned PAC)
620 January 9–10, 2018 Β± 3.9% 43% 49% 8%
Public Policy Polling[7] 862 December 11–12, 2017 Β± 3.3% 42% 51% 7%
Public Policy Polling[9] 572 October 27–29, 2017 Β± 4.1% 40% 50% 9%
Zogby Analytics[10] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 Β± 2.5% 43% 45% 13%
Emerson College[11] 820 October 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.4% 44% 44% 12%
Democracy Corps/Greenberg Research[23] 1,000 September 30 – October 6, 2017 – 42% 54% 4%
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 41% 47% 12%
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 40% 45% 15%
Zogby Analytics[20] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 37% 46% 17%
Public Policy Polling[14] 692 July 14–17, 2017 Β± 3.7% 42% 49% 9%
Public Policy Polling[15] 692 June 9–11, 2017 Β± 3.7% 43% 46% 11%
Public Policy Polling[16] 692 May 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.7% 39% 49% 12%
Public Policy Polling[17] 648 April 17–18, 2017 Β± 3.9% 42% 46% 13%
Public Policy Polling[18] 677 March 27–28, 2017 Β± 3.8% 43% 48% 9%
Politico/Morning Consult[24] 1,791 February 9–10, 2017 Β± 2% 42% 36% 22%
Trump vs. Winfrey
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Oprah Winfrey Others Undecided
CNN/SSRS[6] 1,005 January 14–18, 2018 Β± 3.7% 39% 54% 6% 2%
Quinnipiac University[25] 1,212 January 12–16, 2018 Β± 3.4% 39% 52% – 9%
Public Policy Polling[22]
(for a Warren-aligned PAC)
620 January 9–10, 2018 Β± 3.9% 43% 44% – 13%
NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist[26] 1,092 January 8–10, 2018 Β± 3.0% 39% 50% – 11%
YouGov[19] 856 January 9, 2018 – 43% 47% – 10%
Rasmussen[27] 1,000 January 8–9, 2018 Β± 3.0% 38% 48% – 14%
Zogby Analytics[28] 1,531 March 27–29, 2017 Β±2.5% 36% 46% – 18%
Public Policy Polling[29] 808 March 10–12, 2017 Β± 3.4% 40% 47% – 12%
Trump vs. generic Democrat
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Democratic candidate Others Undecided
NBC News/Wall Street Journal[30] 900 December 13–15, 2017 Β± 3.6% 36% 52% 3% 9%
Politico/Morning Consult[21] 2,586 November 16–19, 2017 Β± 2.0% 35% 44% – 21%
Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,993 November 9–11, 2017 Β± 2.0% 34% 48% – 18%
Politico/Morning Consult[31] 1,990 October 26–30, 2017 Β± 2.0% 36% 46% – 18%
Opinion Savvy[32] 763 August 16–17, 2017 Β± 3.5% 41% 52% – 8%
Gravis Marketing[33] 1,917 July 21–31, 2017 Β± 2.2% 39% 48% – 13%
Politico/Morning Consult[24] 1,791 February 9–10, 2017 Β± 2% 35% 43% – 23%
Trump vs. Wilson
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Frederica Wilson Undecided
Public Policy Polling[9] 572 October 27–29, 2017 Β± 4.1% 39% 42% 19%
Trump vs. Obama
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Michelle Obama Undecided
Zogby Analytics[10] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 Β± 2.5% 44% 47% 9%
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 41% 51% 9%
Trump vs. Cuban
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Mark Cuban Undecided
Emerson College[11] 820 October 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.4% 43% 36% 22%
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 38% 42% 20%
Public Policy Polling[34] 941 February 21–22, 2017 Β± 3.2% 41% 40% 19%
Trump vs. Clinton
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Undecided
Public Policy Polling[12] 865 September 22–25, 2017 Β± 3.3% 42% 47% 11%
Trump vs. Blumenthal
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Richard Blumenthal Undecided
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 39% 42% 19%
Trump vs. Delaney
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump John Delaney Undecided
Public Policy Polling[13] 887 August 18–21, 2017 Β± 3.3% 38% 38% 24%
Pence vs. generic Democrat
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Mike Pence Democratic candidate Undecided
Opinion Savvy[32] 762 August 16–17, 2017 Β± 3.5% 40% 52% 8%
Trump vs. Zuckerberg
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Mark Zuckerberg Undecided
Zogby Analytics[20] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 40% 43% 16%
Public Policy Polling[14] 836 July 14–17, 2017 Β± 3.4% 40% 40% 20%
Trump vs. Zuckerberg vs. Scarborough
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Mark Zuckerberg Joe Scarborough Undecided
Zogby Analytics[20] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 36% 34% 18% 12%
Trump vs. Franken
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Al Franken Undecided
Public Policy Polling[16] 692 May 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.7% 38% 46% 16%
Public Policy Polling[17] 648 April 17–18, 2017 Β± 3.9% 43% 43% 14%
Public Policy Polling[18] 677 March 27–28, 2017 Β± 3.8% 41% 46% 13%
Trump vs. Johnson
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Dwayne Johnson Undecided
Public Policy Polling[16] 692 May 12–14, 2017 Β± 3.7% 37% 42% 21%
Statewide
California California

Trump vs. Gillibrand

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Kirsten Gillibrand Undecided
SurveyUSA[35] 909 January 7–9, 2018 Β± 3.3% 32% 46% 22%

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
SurveyUSA[35] 909 January 7–9, 2018 Β± 3.3% 32% 53% 14%

Trump vs. Harris

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Kamala Harris Undecided
SurveyUSA[35] 909 January 7–9, 2018 Β± 3.3% 33% 53% 13%

Trump vs. Garcetti

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Eric Garcetti Undecided
SurveyUSA[35] 909 January 7–9, 2018 Β± 3.3% 32% 46% 21%

Trump vs. Hanks

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Tom Hanks Undecided
SurveyUSA[35] 909 January 7–9, 2018 Β± 3.3% 31% 56% 14%

Trump vs. Zuckerberg

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Mark Zuckerberg Undecided
SurveyUSA[35] 909 January 7–9, 2018 Β± 3.3% 31% 50% 19%

Trump vs. Winfrey

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Oprah Winfrey Undecided
SurveyUSA[35] 909 January 7–9, 2018 Β± 3.3% 32% 56% 12%
Florida Florida

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 828 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 3.4% 39% 48% 14%
Indiana Indiana

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 603 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 4.0% 45% 39% 17%
Kentucky Kentucky

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 402 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 4.9% 47% 41% 13%
Michigan Michigan

Trump vs. Biden

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Joe Biden Undecided
Zogby Analytics[37] – September 2017 – 35% 52% 13%

Trump vs. Sanders

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Undecided
Zogby Analytics[37] – September 2017 – 36% 54% 10%

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[37] – September 2017 – 37% 46% 17%
Zogby Analytics[36] 803 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 3.5% 35% 51% 14%
Missouri Missouri

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 604 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 4.0% 40% 46% 14%
Montana Montana

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 403 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 4.9% 45% 39% 17%
North Carolina North Carolina

Trump vs. Biden

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Joe Biden Others Undecided
Meredith College[38] 618 January 21–25, 2018 Β± 4.0% 45% 46% 8% 1%

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Others Undecided
Meredith College[38] 618 January 21–25, 2018 Β± 4.0% 48% 40% 12% 1%

Trump vs. Gillibrand

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Kristen Gillibrand Others Undecided
Meredith College[38] 618 January 21–25, 2018 Β± 4.0% 46% 36% 18% 1%

Trump vs. Winfrey

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Oprah Winfrey Others Undecided
Meredith College[38] 618 January 21–25, 2018 Β± 4.0% 48% 38% 12% 2%

Trump vs. Cooper

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Roy Cooper Others Undecided
Meredith College[38] 618 January 21–25, 2018 Β± 4.0% 45% 43% 11% 1%
North Dakota North Dakota

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 403 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 4.9% 47% 36% 17%
Ohio Ohio

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 805 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 3.5% 40% 44% 16%
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 813 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 3.4% 38% 46% 16%
Texas Texas

Trump vs. Cuban

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Mark Cuban Undecided
Public Policy Polling[39] – December 28, 2017 – 44% 47% 9%
West Virginia West Virginia

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 401 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 4.9% 43% 40% 17%
Wisconsin Wisconsin

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Undecided
Zogby Analytics[36] 603 August 17–23, 2017 Β± 4.0% 37% 48% 15%

Nominations

Republican Party

Donald Trump is eligible to run for re-election and intends to do so.[40] His reelection campaign has been ongoing since the beginning of his term, leading pundits to describe his tactic of holding rallies continuously throughout his presidency as a "never-ending campaign".[41] On January 20, 2017 at 5:11 PM, he submitted a letter as a substitute of FEC Form 2, for which he had reached the legal threshold for filing, in compliance with the Federal Election Campaign Act.[42]

Beginning in August 2017, reports arose that members of the Republican Party were preparing a "shadow campaign" against Trump, particularly from the moderate or establishment wings of the party.[43] A poor showing for the GOP in the 2018 midterm elections may lead to an influx of ambitious politicians vying to reclaim the nomination from Trump, as Arizona Senator John McCain has said that "[Republicans] see weakness in this president." Maine Senator Susan Collins, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, and former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie have all expressed doubts that Trump will be the 2020 nominee, with Collins stating "it's too difficult to say."[44][45] Meanwhile, Senator Jeff Flake has claimed that Trump is "inviting" a primary challenger by the way he is governing.[46]

Declared major candidates

The candidates in this section have held public office or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls.

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Official Portrait of President Donald Trump.jpg
Donald Trump
June 14, 1946
(age 71)
New York City, New York
President of the United States since 2017
Candidate for President in 2000
Flag of New York.svg
New York
January 18, 2017
TrumpPence20logo.png
(Campaign β€’ Website)
FEC Filing
[47]

Other declared candidates

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Jack Fellure.jpg
Jack Fellure
October 3, 1931
(age 86)
Midkiff, West Virginia
Retired engineer
Prohibition nominee for President in 2012
Candidate for President in 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2016
Flag of West Virginia.svg
West Virginia
November 9, 2016
FEC Filing
[48]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Potential candidates

Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Potential convention sites

Bids for the National Convention were solicited in the fall of 2017, with finalists being announced early the following spring. The winning bid will be revealed in the summer of 2018.

Endorsements

Primary election polling

National
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Tom Cotton Ted Cruz Jeff Flake Nikki Haley John Kasich Mike Pence Mitt Romney Marco Rubio Ben Sasse Donald Trump Others Undecided
USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times[116] 1,313 December 15, 2017 – January 15, 2018 Β± 2.0% – – – – – – – – – 75% 25% –
Emerson College[117] 198 January 8–11, 2018 – – – – – – – – – – 68% 18% 14%
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner/Democracy Corps[71] 370 January 8–11, 2018 – – 4% 1% 4% 3% 11% 5% 5% – 62% 0% 5%
Public Policy Polling[7] 284 December 11–12, 2017 Β± 3.3% – – – – – – – – – 70% 24% 6%
– 21% – – – – – – – 64% – 15%
– – 16% – – – – – – 74% – 10%
– – – – – 22% – – – 62% – 15%
– – – – 19% – – – – 70% – 11%
Public Policy Polling[9] 183 October 27–29, 2017 – – – – – – – – – – 57% 36% 8%
– 27% – – – – – – – 57% – 16%
– – 14% – – – – – – 70% – 16%
– – – – – 28% – – – 53% – 19%
– – – – 24% – – – – 66% – 11%
Public Policy Polling[12] 268 September 22–25, 2017 – – – – – – – – – – 61% 27% 12%
– 15% – – – – – – – 68% – 17%
– – – – – 21% – – – 59% – 21%
– – – – 18% – – – – 68% – 13%
Fabrizio, Lee & Associates[118]
(Trump-aligned)
1,500 August 2017 Β± 2.5% 1% 14% – – 10% – – – 1% 50% – 24%
Public Policy Polling[13] 275 August 18–21, 2017 – – – – – – – – – – 57% 29% 13%
– 22% – – – – – – – 62% – 17%
– – – – – 24% – – – 52% – 23%
– – – – 21% – – – – 68% – 11%
Opinion Savvy[32] 221 August 16–17, 2017 Β± 6.6% – 12% – – 15% 65% – – – – – 8%
220 – – 8% – 17% – – – – 68% – 7%
Marist Poll[119] 361 August 8–12, 2017 Β± 5.2% – – – – 23% – – – – 64% 3% 10%
– – – – – 33% – – – 56% 3% 8%
Statewide
New Hampshire New Hampshire
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error John Kasich Mike Pence Donald Trump Others Undecided
University of New Hampshire[120] 157 January 28 – February 10, 2018 Β± 7.8% – – 60% 18% 23%
University of New Hampshire[121] 191 October 3–15, 2017 Β± 7.1% – – 47% 23% 30%
American Research Group[122] 600 August 4–6, 2017 Β± 4.0% 52% – 40% – 8%
41% 27% – – 32%

Democratic Party

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, the Democratic Party was seen largely as leaderless[123] and fractured between the centrist, "New Democrat" Clinton wing and the more progressive Sanders wing of the party, echoing the rift brought up in the 2016 primary election.[124] The party was further splinted by the DNC Chair election in February 2017 between moderate Tom Perez and Sanders-backed progressive Keith Ellison. Perez ended up winning the leadership position with Ellison being appointed to the primarily ceremonial position of Deputy Chair in order to lessen the divide. Meanwhile there has been a general shift to the left in regards to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration[citation needed] among Democrats in the Senate, likely to build up credentials for the upcoming primary election.[125]

Perez has commented that the 2020 primary field will likely go into double-digits, rivaling the size of the 2016 GOP primary, which consisted of 17 major candidates.[126] Speculation also mounted that Democrats' best bet to defeat President Trump would be to nominate their own celebrity or businessperson with no government experience, most notably Oprah Winfrey after her memorable speech at the 75th Golden Globe Awards.[127]

The topic of age has been brought up among the most likely front-runners: former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren, and senator Sanders; who will be 77, 71, and 79 respectively on election day (Biden turning 78 before inauguration). Former Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid described the trio as "an old folks home," expressing a need for fresh faces to step up and lead the party.[128]

Declared major candidates

The candidates in this section have held public office or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls.

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
John Delaney 113th Congress official photo.jpg
John Delaney
April 16, 1963
(age 54)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. Representative from Maryland since 2013 Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
July 28, 2017
John Delaney.png
(Campaign β€’ Website)
FEC Filing
[129]

Other declared candidates

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Jeff Boss.jpg
Jeff Boss
May 20, 1963
(age 54)
Conspiracy theorist
Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York in 2018
Candidate for Mayor of New York City in 2017
Candidate for Governor of New Jersey in 2009, 2013, and 2017
Candidate for President in 2008, 2012, and 2016
Candidate for U.S. Senate in 2008 and 2014
Candidate for U.S. Representative in 2010
Flag of New York.svg
New York
August 5, 2017
(Website)
[130]
HB 2013 (cropped 2).jpg
Harry Braun
November 6, 1948
(age 69)
Compton, California
Democratic nominee for U.S. Representative from Arizona in 1984 and 1986
Candidate for President in 2004, 2012, and 2016
Flag of Georgia (U.S. state).svg
Georgia
December 7, 2017
(Website)
FEC Filing
[131]
Roque De La Fuente (cropped).jpg
Rocky De La Fuente
October 10, 1954
(age 63)
San Diego, California
Businessman and political activist
American Delta and Reform nominee for President in 2016
Candidate for Mayor of New York City in 2017
Candidate for U.S. Senate from Florida in 2016
Flag of New York.svg
New York
January 9, 2017 [132]
FullC489D2008-01-01.jpg
Geoffrey Fieger
December 23, 1950
(age 67)
Detroit, Michigan
Attorney
Democratic nominee for Governor of Michigan in 1998
Flag of Michigan.svg
Michigan
January 13, 2017 [133]
Robby Wells.PNG
Robby Wells
April 10, 1968
(age 49)
Bartow, Georgia
Former college football coach
Candidate for President in 2012 and 2016
Flag of North Carolina.svg
North Carolina
May 24, 2017
(Website)
[134]
Andrew Yang talking about urban entrepreneurship at Techonomy Conference 2015 in Detroit, MI (cropped).jpg
Andrew Yang
January 13, 1975
(age 43)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur Flag of New York.svg
New York
November 6, 2017
(Website)
FEC Filing
[135]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Potential candidates

Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Potential convention sites

Bids for the National Convention were solicited in the fall of 2017, with finalists being announced early the following spring. The winning bid will be revealed in the summer of 2018.

Endorsements

Primary election polling

National
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Joe Biden Cory Booker Sherrod Brown Julian Castro Hillary Clinton Andrew Cuomo Al Franken Kirsten Gillibrand Kamala Harris Jason Kander Joe Kennedy III Amy Klobuchar Terry McAuliffe Michelle Obama Tim Ryan Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Oprah Winfrey Mark Zuckerberg Others Undecided
Civis Analytics[296] – January 19, 2018 – 29% – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 27% – 17% – 27% –
Harvard CAPS/Harris[297] 441 January 13–16, 2018 – 27% 4% – – 13% 2% – 1% 4% – – – – – – 16% 10% 13% – – 10%
USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times[116] 1,699 December 15, 2017 – January 15, 2018 Β± 2.0% 28% 3% – – 19% – – 2% 5% – 4% 1% – – 1% 22% 11% – – 4% –
RABA Research[298] 345 January 10–11, 2018 Β± 5.0% 26% – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 21% 18% 20% – – 15%
Emerson College[117] 216 January 8–11, 2018 – 27% 3% – – – – – 3% 2% 4% – 2% – – – 23% 9% – – 9% 19%
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner/Democracy Corps[71] 440 January 6–11, 2018 – 26% 6% – – – – – – – – – – – – – 29% 14% 8% – 12% 6%
Zogby Analytics[299] 682 October 30, 2017 – 19% – – – – 2% – 1% 3% – – 1% 2% 22% – 18% 8% – 4% – 20%
Zogby Analytics[300] 356 September 12, 2017 – 17% – – – – 3% – 3% 6% – – 1% 1% – – 28% 12% – 7% – 23%
Rasmussen[301] 1,000 February 8–9, 2017 Β± 3.0% 15% 8% – – 17% – 6% – – – – – – – – 20% 16% – – 20% –
Public Policy Polling[302] 400 December 6–7, 2016 Β± 4.9% 31% 4% 2% 0% – 2% 3% 3% – – – – – – – 24% 16% – – – 14%
Statewide
Iowa Iowa
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Cory Booker Julian Castro Andrew Cuomo Kirsten Gillibrand Kamala Harris Amy Klobuchar Martin O'Malley Sheryl Sandberg Howard Schultz Undecided
Public Policy Polling[303]
(for an O'Malley-aligned PAC)
1,062 March 3–6, 2017 – 17% 4% 8% 3% 3% 11% 18% 4% 1% 32%
New Hampshire New Hampshire
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Joe Biden Cory Booker John Delaney Kirsten Gillibrand Kamala Harris John Hickenlooper Amy Klobuchar Martin O'Malley Tim Ryan Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Mark Zuckerberg Others Undecided
University of New Hampshire[120] 219 January 28 – February 10, 2018 Β± 6.6% 35% 3% 0% 2% 1% – 0% 1% – 24% 15% – 4% 15%
University of New Hampshire[121] 212 October 3–15, 2017 Β± 6.7% 24% 6% 0% 1% 1% 2% 1% 3% 1% 31% 13% 2% 5% 11%

Third-party, independent, and unaffiliated candidates

Libertarian Party

Declared candidates
Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Zoltan Istvan public profile photo.jpg
Zoltan Istvan
March 30, 1973
(age 44)
Los Angeles, California
Transhumanist, journalist, entrepreneur, and Libertarian futurist
Transhumanist nominee for President in 2016
Candidate for Governor of California in 2018
Flag of California.svg
California
November 25, 2017
(Website)
[304]
Kokesh2013.jpg
Adam Kokesh
February 1, 1982
(age 36)
San Francisco, California
Libertarian and anti-war political activist
Candidate for U.S. Representative from New Mexico in 2010
Flag of Indiana.svg
Indiana
July 18, 2013
(Campaign β€’ Website)
FEC Filing
[305]
Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Potential candidates
Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Convention Site

On December 10, 2017, the Libertarian National Committee chose Austin, Texas as the site of their 2020 national convention. The convention will be held between May 22–25, 2020.[310]

Green Party

Potential candidates
Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Independent or unaffiliated

Beginning in August 2017, rumors emerged about a possible independent "unity ticket" between governors John Kasich (Republican of Ohio), and John Hickenlooper (Democrat of Colorado) based on their cooperation on healthcare. Playfully given the nicknames "Kasichlooper" and "The Johns," the idea of a joint ticket was shot down by both governors.[315] Hickenlooper commenting "it’s fun to talk about, but it’s not in the cards."[316] With Kasich quipping "Look, Kasich-Hickenlooper, first of all, you couldn't pronounce it and second of all, you couldn't fit it on a bumper sticker [...] the answer is no."

Declared candidates
Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
091507-USCNeb-LawrenceJackson.jpg
Lawrence Jackson
August 30, 1985
(age 32)
Los Angeles, California
Former football player Flag of California.svg
California
November 23, 2017
FEC Filing
[317]
Photo of Dan Rattiner.jpg
Dan Rattiner
August 15, 1939
(age 78)
New York City, New York
Journalist and newspaper publisher Flag of New York.svg
New York
April 24, 2015 [318]
Kanye West at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival.jpg
Kanye West
June 8, 1977
(age 40)
Atlanta, Georgia
Rapper, singer, songwriter, record producer, fashion designer, and entrepreneur Flag of California.svg
California
August 30, 2015 [319]
Withdrawn candidates
Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Potential candidates
Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Maps

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o This individual is not registered to the political party of this section, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.

References

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