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The European Venus Explorer (EVE), known until 2007 as the Venus Entry Probe (VEP), is a proposed European Space Agency space probe to Venus. In the timeline of the 2005 TRS (technology reference study), the spacecraft was planned to be launched on a Soyuz-2/Fregat launch vehicle around 2013.[1] However, submissions to act on the study in 2007[2] and 2010[3] have been rejected.[4][clarification needed So, right now, this is a non-mission?]

EVE was an M-Class mission proposal in the Cosmic Vision Programme.[5] The mission consitsted of an orbiter, and balloon which would circumnavigate the planet over the course of week, and a lander probe which would operate for around an hour to the surface.[6]

Overview[edit]

The mission (in the 2005 TRS) would involve two satellites: the Venus Polar Orbiter (VPO), for remote sensing of the atmospheric, and the Venus Elliptical Orbiter (VEO), which deploys the entry probe from a highly elliptical orbit. The entry probe would contain a balloon-aerobot which floats in benign conditions at 55km in the middle cloud layer, and drops up to 15 microprobes into the lower atmosphere.[1]

Spacecraft in proposal[7]

  • Orbiter
  • Balloon (for 50-60 km altitude)
  • Descent probe

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b ESA description of the VEP technology reference study
  2. ^ First proposal for launch in 2016-18 timeframe
  3. ^ Second proposal for 2021-23 launch
  4. ^ EVE - European Venus Explorer
  5. ^ Chassefière, E.; Korablev, O.; Imamura, T.; Baines, K. H.; Wilson, C. F.; Titov, D. V.; Aplin, K. L.; Balint, T.; Blamont, J. E. (2009-03-01). "European Venus Explorer (EVE): an in-situ mission to Venus". Experimental Astronomy. 23 (3): 741–760. Bibcode:2009ExA....23..741C. doi:10.1007/s10686-008-9093-x. ISSN 0922-6435. 
  6. ^ Chassefière, E.; Korablev, O.; Imamura, T.; Baines, K. H.; Wilson, C. F.; Titov, D. V.; Aplin, K. L.; Balint, T.; Blamont, J. E. (2009-03-01). "European Venus Explorer (EVE): an in-situ mission to Venus". Experimental Astronomy. 23 (3): 741–760. Bibcode:2009ExA....23..741C. doi:10.1007/s10686-008-9093-x. ISSN 0922-6435. 
  7. ^ Chassefière, E.; Korablev, O.; Imamura, T.; Baines, K. H.; Wilson, C. F.; Titov, D. V.; Aplin, K. L.; Balint, T.; Blamont, J. E. (2009-03-01). "European Venus Explorer (EVE): an in-situ mission to Venus". Experimental Astronomy. 23 (3): 741–760. Bibcode:2009ExA....23..741C. doi:10.1007/s10686-008-9093-x. ISSN 0922-6435. 

External links[edit]

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