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THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF WIDE RECEIVERS..
THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF WIDE RECEIVERS..
Published: 2017/09/11
Channel: Deestroying
Michael Henderson- Wide Receiver
Michael Henderson- Wide Receiver
Published: 2007/11/27
Channel: CharR
WIDE RECEIVERS BE LIKE..
WIDE RECEIVERS BE LIKE..
Published: 2017/05/24
Channel: Deestroying
Best Wide Receiver Route Running
Best Wide Receiver Route Running
Published: 2017/07/01
Channel: 99 Problems
Antonio Brown GoPro Footage | How to Be a Great Wide Receiver | NFL
Antonio Brown GoPro Footage | How to Be a Great Wide Receiver | NFL
Published: 2015/07/31
Channel: NFL
Best of Wide Receivers | 2017 NFL Combine Highlights
Best of Wide Receivers | 2017 NFL Combine Highlights
Published: 2017/03/05
Channel: NFL
How To Be A Wide Receiver
How To Be A Wide Receiver
Published: 2011/04/06
Channel: Sports And Outdoors
Top 20 Wide Receiver Duos Heading Into 2017 (#
Top 20 Wide Receiver Duos Heading Into 2017 (#'s 10-6) | Burleson's Best | GMFB | NFL
Published: 2017/07/13
Channel: NFL
Dede Westbrook || The Best Wide Receiver In College Football || 2016 Highlights ᴴᴰ
Dede Westbrook || The Best Wide Receiver In College Football || 2016 Highlights ᴴᴰ
Published: 2016/11/24
Channel: 99 Highlights
Wide Receiver Edition | Dude Perfect
Wide Receiver Edition | Dude Perfect
Published: 2013/03/07
Channel: Dude Perfect
6
6'7 Freshman Wide Receiver : Darren Jones '19 - Upland High CA - Freshman Year Spotlight
Published: 2015/11/26
Channel: utrhighlightvideos
Wide Receiver Drills - Coach Ryan O
Wide Receiver Drills - Coach Ryan O'Hara
Published: 2016/01/23
Channel: Ryan OHara
Top 10 Wide Receivers in the NFL 2017
Top 10 Wide Receivers in the NFL 2017
Published: 2017/07/10
Channel: NFL Top Ten
7 Best Wide Receiver Qualities | Football Recruiting
7 Best Wide Receiver Qualities | Football Recruiting
Published: 2014/08/02
Channel: Howcast
Best Wide Receiver Route Running Part 2
Best Wide Receiver Route Running Part 2
Published: 2017/07/08
Channel: 99 Problems
Wide Receiver Step Back Move with Stevie Johnson
Wide Receiver Step Back Move with Stevie Johnson
Published: 2013/09/08
Channel: ProTips4U
Wide Receiver Press Release Techniques
Wide Receiver Press Release Techniques
Published: 2015/01/16
Channel: Buddy Blevins
Wide Receiver Drills at Practice
Wide Receiver Drills at Practice
Published: 2017/08/03
Channel: InsideTheU
Top 10 Best Wide Receivers in the NFL 2016
Top 10 Best Wide Receivers in the NFL 2016
Published: 2016/12/16
Channel: NFL Top Ten
Top 10 Wide Receivers of All Time! | NFL Highlights
Top 10 Wide Receivers of All Time! | NFL Highlights
Published: 2017/06/28
Channel: NFL
Fantasy Football 2017 Draft Rankings: Wide Receivers
Fantasy Football 2017 Draft Rankings: Wide Receivers
Published: 2017/08/30
Channel: TPS
Top 20 Wide Receiver Duos Heading Into 2017 (#
Top 20 Wide Receiver Duos Heading Into 2017 (#'s 5-1) | Burleson's Best | GMFB | NFL
Published: 2017/07/14
Channel: NFL
Houston Football: Receivers GoPro
Houston Football: Receivers GoPro
Published: 2015/03/31
Channel: UHAthletics
Madden 17 Career Mode Gameplay - Creation of My Wide Receiver | Ep 1 (Speed WR Build)
Madden 17 Career Mode Gameplay - Creation of My Wide Receiver | Ep 1 (Speed WR Build)
Published: 2016/08/21
Channel: iPodKingCarter
5 Tips to be a Better Receiver - Football Tip Fridays
5 Tips to be a Better Receiver - Football Tip Fridays
Published: 2017/09/01
Channel: I Know Football
Common Mistake by Wide Receiver
Common Mistake by Wide Receiver
Published: 2014/06/05
Channel: My Football Mentor
Top 10 Wide Receivers in the 2018 Class
Top 10 Wide Receivers in the 2018 Class
Published: 2017/03/23
Channel: MaxPreps
Football: Intro to Wide Reciever Routes
Football: Intro to Wide Reciever Routes
Published: 2013/01/10
Channel: TheOnDeckCircle
Top 10 Wide Receivers of All Time | NFL
Top 10 Wide Receivers of All Time | NFL
Published: 2016/03/22
Channel: NFL
Equanimeous St. Brown || Best Wide Receiver for 2017 || Official Notre Dame 2016-17 Highlights
Equanimeous St. Brown || Best Wide Receiver for 2017 || Official Notre Dame 2016-17 Highlights
Published: 2017/03/31
Channel: LaManna Highlights
How to Play Football : Wide Receiver Catching Tips
How to Play Football : Wide Receiver Catching Tips
Published: 2009/06/05
Channel: eHow
How To Play Wide Receiver Football Motivational Video
How To Play Wide Receiver Football Motivational Video
Published: 2009/06/17
Channel: dub maddox
Top 3 Wide Receiver Performances (2015) | NFL Now
Top 3 Wide Receiver Performances (2015) | NFL Now
Published: 2015/12/31
Channel: NFL
Breaking down the top wide receiver and cornerback Week 2 matchups
Breaking down the top wide receiver and cornerback Week 2 matchups
Published: 2017/09/17
Channel: NFL World
Treinos & Dicas #9 - Drills para Wide Receiver - Parte1
Treinos & Dicas #9 - Drills para Wide Receiver - Parte1
Published: 2015/05/25
Channel: TD Brasil
How Wide Receivers Can Become Faster Off The Line
How Wide Receivers Can Become Faster Off The Line
Published: 2012/04/25
Channel: STACK - Velocity Sports Performance
2017 Fantasy Football: WR Rankings Reveal - Week 2
2017 Fantasy Football: WR Rankings Reveal - Week 2
Published: 2017/09/13
Channel: FNTSY Sports Network
Top 20 Wide Receiver Duos Heading Into 2017 (#
Top 20 Wide Receiver Duos Heading Into 2017 (#'s 20-16) | Burleson's Best | GMFB | NFL Network
Published: 2017/07/11
Channel: NFL Network
NFL Wide Receiver Passes
NFL Wide Receiver Passes
Published: 2017/05/17
Channel: Highlight Heaven
CAN RICHARD SHERMAN DOMINATE AS A WIDE RECEIVER? MADDEN 17 CHALLENGE
CAN RICHARD SHERMAN DOMINATE AS A WIDE RECEIVER? MADDEN 17 CHALLENGE
Published: 2016/12/16
Channel: MikeMAACC
Wide Receiver Starts & Stance
Wide Receiver Starts & Stance
Published: 2014/11/19
Channel: Train EAP
WIDE RECEIVER RYAN TANNEHILL OUT OF POSITION! Madden 17 Ultimate Team Gameplay Ep. 15
WIDE RECEIVER RYAN TANNEHILL OUT OF POSITION! Madden 17 Ultimate Team Gameplay Ep. 15
Published: 2016/12/17
Channel: QJB
Wide Receiver Drills- Stance and Start- 5-yard Burst Drill- Wide Receiver Pro DVD
Wide Receiver Drills- Stance and Start- 5-yard Burst Drill- Wide Receiver Pro DVD
Published: 2012/02/06
Channel: Aaron R. Boone
The Next Great Clemson Wide Receiver || Clemson WR Deon Cain 2016 Highlights ᴴᴰ
The Next Great Clemson Wide Receiver || Clemson WR Deon Cain 2016 Highlights ᴴᴰ
Published: 2017/07/11
Channel: JustBombsProductions
Love/Hate: Wide Receiver edition | The Fantasy Show with Matthew Berry | ESPN
Love/Hate: Wide Receiver edition | The Fantasy Show with Matthew Berry | ESPN
Published: 2017/08/31
Channel: ESPN
Urban Meyer: Wide Receiver Drills
Urban Meyer: Wide Receiver Drills
Published: 2016/06/05
Channel: CoachTube
Wide Receiver Blocking
Wide Receiver Blocking
Published: 2014/11/19
Channel: Train EAP
Speed and Agility Wide Receiver Drills
Speed and Agility Wide Receiver Drills
Published: 2015/02/25
Channel: Joe Mendoza
2017 Fantasy Football Wide Receiver Draft Strategy
2017 Fantasy Football Wide Receiver Draft Strategy
Published: 2017/07/27
Channel: Fantasy Smack Talk
Top 3 Sleepers | 2017 Fantasy Football | Wide Receivers
Top 3 Sleepers | 2017 Fantasy Football | Wide Receivers
Published: 2017/06/18
Channel: Nick Ercolano
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

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An example of a wide receiver's positioning in an offensive formation: Split End (SE), Slot Back (SB), Slot Receiver (SR), and Flanker (FL) position.

A wide receiver (also referred to as wideouts or simply receivers) is an offensive position in American and Canadian football, and is the key player in most of the passing plays. They get their name because they are split out "wide" (near the sidelines), farthest away from the rest of the team. Wide receivers are among the fastest players on the field. The wide receiver functions as the pass-catching specialist.

Role[edit]

The wide receiver's principal role is to catch passes from the quarterback. On passing plays, the receiver attempts to avoid, outmaneuver, or simply outrun defenders (typically cornerbacks or safeties) in the area of his pass route. If the receiver becomes open, or has an unobstructed path to the destination of a catch, he may then become the quarterback's target. Once a pass is thrown in his direction, the receiver's goal is to first catch the ball and then attempt to run downfield. Some receivers are perceived as a deep threat because of their flat-out speed, while others may be possession receivers known for not dropping passes, running crossing routes across the middle of the field, and generally, converting third down situations. A receiver's height also contributes to their expected role; taller receivers tend to play further to the outside and run deep more often, shorter receivers tend to play inside and run more routes underneath the top of the defense.

A wide receiver has two potential roles during running plays. Particularly in the case of draw plays and other trick plays, he may run a pass route with the intent of drawing off defenders. Alternatively, he may block normally for the running back. Well-rounded receivers are noted for blocking defensive backs in support of teammates in addition to their pass-catching abilities.

Sometimes wide receivers are used to run the ball, usually in some form of an end-around or reverse. This can be effective because the defense usually does not expect them to be the ball carrier on running plays. For example, wide receiver Jerry Rice rushed the ball 87 times for 645 yards and 10 touchdowns in his 20 NFL seasons.[1]

In even rarer cases, receivers may pass the ball as part of a trick play. A receiver can legally pass the ball so long as they receive the ball behind the line of scrimmage, in the form of a hand off or backwards lateral. This sort of trick play is often employed with a receiver who has past experience playing quarterback at a lower level, such as high school, or sometimes, college. Antwaan Randle El threw a touchdown pass at the wide receiver position in Super Bowl XL playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers against the Seattle Seahawks. Antwaan Randle El played quarterback for four years at Indiana University.

Wide receivers often also serve on special teams as kick returners or punt returners, as gunners on kick coverage teams, or as part of the hands team during onside kicks.

Finally, on errant passes, receivers must frequently play a defensive role by attempting to prevent an interception. If a pass is intercepted, receivers must use their speed to chase down and tackle the ball carrier to prevent him from returning the ball for a long gain or a touchdown.

In the NFL, wide receivers can use the numbers 10–19 and 80–89.

History of the position[edit]

The wide receiver grew out of a position known as the end. Originally, the ends played on the offensive line, immediately next to the tackles. By the rules governing the forward pass, ends (positioned at the end of the line of scrimmage) and backs (positioned behind the line of scrimmage) are eligible receivers. Most early football teams used the ends as receivers sparingly, their position often left them in heavy traffic with many defenders around. By the 1930s, some teams were experimenting with moving one end far out near the sideline, to make them more open to receive passes. These split ends became the prototype for the modern wide receiver. Don Hutson, who played college football at the Alabama and professionally with the Green Bay Packers was the first player to exploit the potentials of the split end position, and is widely credited as inventing the wide receiver position.

As the passing game evolved, a second wide receiver position was added. While it is possible to move the opposite end out wide for a second split end position most teams preferred to leave that end in close to provide extra blocking protection on the quarterback's blind side. That player was essentially playing the modern day tight end position. Instead of moving the blind side end out, one of the three running backs was split wide instead, creating the flanker position. The flanker lined up off the line of scrimmage like a running back or quarterback, but split outside like a split end. Lining up behind the line of scrimmage gave flankers some advantages. Flankers have more "space" between themselves and a pressing defensive back, so cornerbacks can not as easily "jam" them at the line of scrimmage. This is in addition to being eligible for motion plays, allowing for the flanker to move laterally before and during the snap. Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch is one of the earliest players to successfully exploit the potentials of the flanker position as a member of the Los Angeles Rams during the 1950s.

While some teams did experiment with more than two wide receivers as a gimmick or trick play, most teams used the pro set as the standard set of offensive personnel (a flanker, a split end, a half back, a full back, and a tight end). An early innovator, coach Sid Gillman used 3+ wide receiver sets as early as the 1960s. In sets that have three, four, or five wide receivers, extra receivers are typically called slot receivers, as they play in the "slot" (open space) between the furthest receiver and the offensive line. In most situations, the slot receiver lines up off the line of scrimmage like the flanker position. The first use of a slot receiver is often credited to Al Davis, a Gillman assistant who took the concept with him as a coach of the 1960s Oakland Raiders. Other members of the Gillman coaching tree, including Don Coryell and John Madden, brought these progressive offensive ideas along with them into the 1970s and early 1980s, but it wasn't until the 1990s that teams began to reliably use three or more wide receivers, notably the "run and shoot" offense popularized by the Houston Cougars of the NCAA and the Houston Oilers of the NFL, and the "K Gun" offense used by the Buffalo Bills. Charlie Joiner, a member of the "Air Coryell" San Diego Chargers teams of the late 1970s-early 1980s was the first "slot receiver" to be his teams primary receiving weapon.

Types[edit]

While the general fan base and most commentators use the generic term wide receiver for all such players, specific names exist for most receiver positions:

  • Split end (X or SE): A receiver on the line of scrimmage, necessary to meet the rule requiring seven such players at snap. Where applicable, this receiver is on the opposite side of the tight end. The split end is farthest from center on his side of the field.[2]
  • Flanker (Z or FL or 6 back): A receiver lining up behind the line of scrimmage. Frequently the team's featured receiver, the flanker uses the initial buffer between himself and a defender to avoid immediate "jamming" (legal defensive contact within five yards of the line of scrimmage). The flanker is generally on the same side of the formation as a tight end. As with the split end, this receiver is the farthest player from the center on his side of the field. The flanker is usually lined up just like a split end except that he is just behind the line of scrimmage, therefore being in the backfield and not on the line.[3]
  • Slot receiver (Y or SR): A less-formal name given to receivers in addition to split ends and flankers (for example, tight ends who line up wide). These receivers line up between the split end/flanker and the linemen. If aligned with a flanker, the slot receiver is usually on the line of scrimmage, and if with a split end, off the line of scrimmage. As with the flanker position, a featured receiver often takes a slot position with a split end to avoid jamming.[3]
  • Slot back: A receiver lining up in the offensive back field. Canadian and arena football allow them to take a running start at the line. They are usually larger players as they need to make catches over the middle. In American football slot backs are typically used in flexbone or other triple option offenses while Canadian football uses them in almost all formations.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jerry Rice career statistics at SI.com
  2. ^ Wide receiver terminology at phillyburbs.com
  3. ^ a b Wide receiver terminology at phillyburbs.com
Positions in American football and Canadian football
Offense (Skill position) Defense Special teams
Linemen Guard, Tackle, Center Linemen Tackle, End Kicking players Placekicker, Punter, Kickoff specialist
Quarterback (Dual-threat, Game manager, System) Linebacker Snapping Long snapper, Holder
Backs Halfback/Tailback, Fullback, H-back, Triple-threat Backs Cornerback, Safety, Halfback Returning Punt returner, Kick returner, Jammer
Receivers Wide receiver (Eligible), Tight end, Slotback Nickelback, Dimeback Tackling Gunner, Upback, Utility
Formations (List)NomenclatureStrategy

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