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Zhuangzi (Zhuang Zhou) Quotes
Zhuangzi (Zhuang Zhou) Quotes
Published: 2012/12/07
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[Taoism Audiobook] Musings of a Chinese Mystic (Teachings of Zhuangzi) The Way of Dao
[Taoism Audiobook] Musings of a Chinese Mystic (Teachings of Zhuangzi) The Way of Dao
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Zhuangzi shuo Chuang Tzu Part 1a
Zhuangzi shuo Chuang Tzu Part 1a
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Freshman Studies Lecture - Zhuangzi's BASIC WRITINGS
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Zhuang Zhou
Zhuang Zhou
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Daoist Physics Part II;  Butterfly (black hole) dreams he
Daoist Physics Part II; Butterfly (black hole) dreams he's a man. --Chuang Tzu
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Musings of a Chinese Mystic Teachings of Zhuangzi The Way of Dao   2017
Musings of a Chinese Mystic Teachings of Zhuangzi The Way of Dao 2017
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[Kings of glory]Played a game, Zhuang Zhou
[Kings of glory]Played a game, Zhuang Zhou
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Chinese Wisdom (4) Zhuang Zhou on Liberty
Chinese Wisdom (4) Zhuang Zhou on Liberty
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Zhuang Zhou
Zhuang Zhou
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庄周梦蝶 Zhuang Zhou Dreams to be a Butterfly
庄周梦蝶 Zhuang Zhou Dreams to be a Butterfly
Published: 2009/03/18
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[Taoism Audiobook] Musings of a Chinese Mystic (Teachings of Zhuangzi) The Way of Dao - 2017
[Taoism Audiobook] Musings of a Chinese Mystic (Teachings of Zhuangzi) The Way of Dao - 2017
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A Ballad To Zhuang Zi - Ismet Himmet
A Ballad To Zhuang Zi - Ismet Himmet
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Published: 2015/01/20
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The Stories of Chuang Tzu - EP 1: The Flight from the Shadow
The Stories of Chuang Tzu - EP 1: The Flight from the Shadow
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Daoism (or Taoism) 2 - Zhuangzi
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The Butterfly Dream
The Butterfly Dream
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Boris Golovin The Butterfly of Zhuangzi 庄子蝴蝶 Бабочка Чжуанцзы Zhuang Zhou
Boris Golovin The Butterfly of Zhuangzi 庄子蝴蝶 Бабочка Чжуанцзы Zhuang Zhou
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BOOKS: DeLillo, Six Records, Zhuang Zhou & Dangerous Laughter
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Published: 2015/01/16
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"Zhuang Zhou? Butterfly?" - Akkad Izre
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Published: 2017/10/05
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"Neither Lord nor Subject" by Bao Jingyan
"Neither Lord nor Subject" by Bao Jingyan
Published: 2017/10/16
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The Way of Chuang Tzu - By: Thomas Merton - Part 1 - AudioBookUniversity.com
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Published: 2013/09/01
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Zhuangzi - Top 10 Quotes
Zhuangzi - Top 10 Quotes
Published: 2011/12/09
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Brook Ziporyn - Losing the Self in the Philosophy of Zhuangzi
Brook Ziporyn - Losing the Self in the Philosophy of Zhuangzi
Published: 2017/08/08
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Claudio Lin 5:Zhuang Zhou
Claudio Lin 5:Zhuang Zhou
Published: 2017/09/13
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Zhuangzi "A frog in a well cannot conceive of the ocean" (Quotes & Art)
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Published: 2013/11/21
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Published: 2015/12/11
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Zhuangzi shuo Chuang Tzu Part 1b
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Published: 2014/04/21
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[Taoism Audiobook] Musings of a Chinese Mystic (Teachings of Zhuangzi) The Way of Dao
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Published: 2017/10/17
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Livia Kohn: Zhuangzi on Perfect Happiness Part 2 of 4
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[Taoism Audiobook] Musings of a Chinese Mystic (Teachings of Zhuangzi) The Way of Dao - 2017
[Taoism Audiobook] Musings of a Chinese Mystic (Teachings of Zhuangzi) The Way of Dao - 2017
Published: 2017/04/04
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The Witness Zhuangzi Boat Quote
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Published: 2016/02/03
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Tao as the Central Factor.wmv
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Published: 2010/09/24
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Zhou Zhuang
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El libro de Zhuang Zi - Capítulo 1 - Libre caminar
El libro de Zhuang Zi - Capítulo 1 - Libre caminar
Published: 2012/04/05
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WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Zhuangzi (莊子)
Zhuang Zhou (莊周)
Zhuangzi.gif
Born c. 369 BC
Died c. 286 BC
Era Ancient philosophy
Region Chinese philosophy
School Taoism
Zhuang Zhou
Traditional Chinese 莊周
Simplified Chinese 庄周
Alternative Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 莊子
Simplified Chinese 庄子
Literal meaning "Master Zhuang"

Zhuang Zhou, often known as Zhuangzi ("Master Zhuang"),[a] was an influential Chinese philosopher who lived around the 4th century BC during the Warring States period, a period corresponding to the summit of Chinese philosophy, the Hundred Schools of Thought. He is credited with writing—in part or in whole—a work known by his name, the Zhuangzi, which is one of the foundational texts of Daoism.

Life[edit]

The only account of the life of Zhuangzi is a brief sketch in chapter 63 of Sima Qian's Records of the Grand Historian, and most of the information it contains seems to have simply been drawn from anecdotes in the Zhuangzi itself.[1] In Sima's biography, he is described as a minor official from the town of Meng (in modern Anhui) in the state of Song, living in the time of King Hui of Liang and King Xuan of Qi (late 4th century BC).[2] Sima Qian writes:

Chuang-Tze had made himself well acquainted with all the literature of his time, but preferred the views of Lao-Tze; and ranked himself among his followers, so that of the more than ten myriads of characters contained in his published writings the greater part are occupied with metaphorical illustrations of Lao's doctrines. He made "The Old Fisherman," "The Robber Chih," and "The Cutting open Satchels," to satirize and expose the disciples of Confucius, and clearly exhibit the sentiments of Lao. Such names and characters as "Wei-lei Hsu" and "Khang-sang Tze" are fictitious, and the pieces where they occur are not to be understood as narratives of real events.
But Chuang was an admirable writer and skillful composer, and by his instances and truthful descriptions hit and exposed the Mohists and Literati. The ablest scholars of his day could not escape his satire nor reply to it, while he allowed and enjoyed himself with his sparkling, dashing style; and thus it was that the greatest men, even kings and princes, could not use him for their purposes.
King Wei of Chu, having heard of the ability of Chuang Chau, sent messengers with large gifts to bring him to his court, and promising also that he would make him his chief minister. Chuang-Tze, however, only laughed and said to them, "A thousand ounces of silver are a great gain to me; and to be a high noble and minister is a most honorable position. But have you not seen the victim-ox for the border sacrifice? It is carefully fed for several years, and robed with rich embroidery that it may be fit to enter the Grand Temple. When the time comes for it to do so, it would prefer to be a little pig, but it can not get to be so. Go away quickly, and do not soil me with your presence. I had rather amuse and enjoy myself in the midst of a filthy ditch than be subject to the rules and restrictions in the court of a sovereign. I have determined never to take office, but prefer the enjoyment of my own free will."[3]

The validity of his existence has been questioned by some, including Russell Kirkland, who writes:

According to modern understandings of Chinese tradition, the text known as the Chuang-tzu was the production of a 'Taoist' thinker of ancient China named Chuang Chou/Zhuang Zhou. In reality, it was nothing of the sort. The Chuang-tzu known to us today was the production of a thinker of the third century CE named Kuo Hsiang. Though Kuo was long called merely a 'commentator,' he was in reality much more: he arranged the texts and compiled the present 33-chapter edition. Regarding the identity of the original person named Chuang Chou/Zhuangzi, there is no reliable historical data at all.[4]

However, Sima Qian's biography of Zhuangzi pre-dates Guo Xiang (Kuo Hsiang) by centuries. Furthermore, the Han Shu "Yiwenzhi" (Monograph on literature) lists a text Zhuangzi, showing that a text with this title existed no later than the early 1st century CE, again pre-dating Guo Xiang by centuries.

Writing[edit]

Zhuangzi is traditionally credited as the author of at least part of the work bearing his name, the Zhuangzi. This work, in its current shape consisting of 33 chapters, is traditionally divided into three parts: the first, known as the "Inner Chapters", consists of the first seven chapters; the second, known as the "Outer Chapters", consist of the next 15 chapters; the last, known as the "Mixed Chapters", consist of the remaining 11 chapters. The meaning of these three names is disputed: according to Guo Xiang, the "Inner Chapters" were written by Zhuangzi, the "Outer Chapters" written by his disciples, and the "Mixed Chapters" by other hands; the other interpretation is that the names refer to the origin of the titles of the chapters—the "Inner Chapters" take their titles from phrases inside the chapter, the "Outer Chapters" from the opening words of the chapters, and the "Mixed Chapters" from a mixture of these two sources.[5]

Further study of the text does not provide a clear choice between these alternatives. On the one side, as Martin Palmer points out in the introduction to his translation, two of the three chapters Sima Qian cited in his biography of Zhuangzi, come from the "Outer Chapters" and the third from the "Mixed Chapters". "Neither of these are allowed as authentic Chuang Tzu chapters by certain purists, yet they breathe the very spirit of Chuang Tzu just as much as, for example, the famous 'butterfly passage' of chapter 2."[6]

On the other hand, chapter 33 has been often considered as intrusive, being a survey of the major movements during the "Hundred Schools of Thought" with an emphasis on the philosophy of Hui Shi. Further, A.C. Graham and other critics have subjected the text to a stylistic analysis and identified four strains of thought in the book: a) the ideas of Zhuangzi or his disciples; b) a "primitivist" strain of thinking similar to Laozi; c) a strain very strongly represented in chapters 8-11 which is attributed to the philosophy of Yang Chu; and d) a fourth strain which may be related to the philosophical school of Huang-Lao.[7] In this spirit, Martin Palmer wrote that "trying to read Chuang Tzu sequentially is a mistake. The text is a collection, not a developing argument."[8]

Zhuangzi was renowned for his brilliant wordplay and use of parables to convey messages. His critiques of Confucian society and historical figures are humorous and at times ironic.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Other romanizations include Zhuang Tze, Chuang Chou, Chuang Tsu, Chuang Tzu, Chouang-Dsi, Chuang Tse, or Chuangtze.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mair (1994), p. xxxi-xxxiii.
  2. ^ Ziporyn (2009), p. vii.
  3. ^ Horne (1917), pp. 397–398.
  4. ^ Kirkland (2004), pp. 33–34.
  5. ^ Roth (1993), pp. 56–57.
  6. ^ Palmer (1996), p. xix.
  7. ^ Schwartz (1985), p. 216.
  8. ^ Palmer (1996), p. x.
  • Ames, Roger T. (1991), ‘The Mencian Concept of Ren Xing: Does it Mean Human Nature?’ in Chinese Texts and Philosophical Contexts, ed. Henry Rosemont, Jr. LaSalle, Ill.: Open Court Press.
  • Ames, Roger T. (1998) ed. Wandering at Ease in the Zhuangzi. Albany: State University of New York Press.
  • Bruya, Brian (translator). (1992). Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-00882-0.
  • Chan, Wing-Tsit (1963). A Source Book In Chinese Philosophy. USA: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01964-9. 
  • Chang, Chung-yuan (1963). Creativity and Taoism: A Study of Chinese Philosophy, Art, and Poetry. New York: Julian Press. 
  • Creel, Herrlee G. (1982). What is Taoism? : and other studies in Chinese cultural history. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-12047-3. 
  • Hansen, Chad (2003). "The Relatively Happy Fish," Asian Philosophy 13:145-164.
  • Horne, Charles F., ed. (1917). The Sacred Books and Early Literature of the East, Volume XII: Medieval China. New York: Parke. 
  • Kirkland, Russell (2004). Taoism: The Enduring Tradition. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-26321-4. 
  • Mair, Victor H. (1994). Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang Tzu. New York: Bantam Books. ISBN 0-553-37406-0.  (Google Books)
  • Merton, Thomas. (1969). The Way of Chuang Tzu. New York: New Directions.
  • Palmer, Martin (1996). The Book of Chuang Tzu. Penguin. ISBN 978-0-14-019488-3. 
  • Roth, H. D. (1993). "Chuang tzu 莊子". In Loewe, Michael. Early Chinese Texts: A Bibliographical Guide. Berkeley: Society for the Study of Early China; Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California Berkeley. pp. 56–66. ISBN 1-55729-043-1. 
  • Schwartz, Benjamin J. (1985). The World of Thought in Ancient China. Cambridge: Belknap Press. ISBN 978-0-674-96191-3. 
  • Waltham, Clae (editor). (1971). Chuang Tzu: Genius of the Absurd. New York: Ace Books.
  • Watson, Burton (1962). Early Chinese Literature. New York: Columbia University Press. 
  • Watts, Alan with Huan, Al Chung-liang (1975). Tao: The Watercourse Way. New York: Pantheon Books. ISBN 0-394-73311-8. 
  • Ziporyn, Brook (2009). Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries Hackett Classics Series. Hackett Publishing. ISBN 978-1-60384-435-2. 

External links[edit]

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